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Tag: Longleaf Pine

The content below has been tagged with the term “Longleaf Pine.”

Articles

  • A tiny beige tortoise walking on sandy soil.
    Baby gopher tortoise. Photo by Randy Browning, USFWS.

    Protecting military readiness and the iconic gopher tortoise at the same time

    March 24, 2017 | 6 minute read

    Tifton, Georgia – There isn’t a military base for 50 miles, but the Army plays a critical role at the Alapaha River Wildlife Management Area. A first-in-the-nation conservation plan, crafted by the U.S. Department of Defense, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) and wildlife agencies in Alabama, Florida, Georgia and South Carolina, protects at-risk gopher tortoises here while helping military bases to continue training and testing missions across the tortoise’s Southern turf.  Learn more...

Faq

News

  • Bright green needles emerge from a central cone of a longleaf pine tree
    Information icon Longleaf pine needles. Photo by Dot Paul, USDA NRCS.

    Seeing the forest for the trees

    April 6, 2016 | 3 minute read

    More than 30 animal species that depend on longleaf pine forests are federally listed as endangered or threatened, and many more are considered to be at-risk. This is why the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with partners to restore longleaf pine across the southeastern United States.  Read the full story...

  • A Longleaf pine seedling.
    Information icon Longleaf pine seedling. Photo by USDA.

    National Fish and Wildlife Foundation announces $4.6 million in funding for restoration of longleaf pine forest and ecosystem across the Southeast

    June 30, 2015 | 5 minute read

    Washington, D.C. — The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) today announced $4.6 million in grants to support the longleaf ecosystem and advance the objectives of the Range-Wide Conservation Plan for Longleaf Pine. Funding was awarded to 22 projects across the historic longleaf range that ultimately will restore more than 11,600 acres and enhance more than 163,000 additional acres of longleaf pine habitat, while leveraging over $6.4 million in additional funds from grant partners.  Read the full story...

Podcasts

  • A dozen large, flying birds with red markings over the eye.
    Sandhill cranes at Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge in Decatur, AL. Photo by Tim Lumley, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    National Wildlife Refuge Week

    November 6, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. National Wildlife Refuge week is October 11-17. In the Southern Appalachians, where public lands are likely National Forests or National Park Service lands, it’s important to remember wildlife refuges, administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, for they are the only system of federal lands devoted to wildlife. Across the nation, there are 550 national wildlife refuges, protecting more than 150 million acres, more land than the entire national park system.  Learn more...

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