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Tag: Longleaf Pine

The content below has been tagged with the term “Longleaf Pine.”

Articles

  • A low-growing shrub with leaves like sand dollars
    Information icon A rare hairy rattleweed plant. Photo by Daniel Chapman, USFWS.

    Learning to love a hairy rattleweed

    February 18, 2020 | 6 minute read

    Brunswick, Georgia — It sounds like the name of a punk rocker, or an illicit drug. It lurks under power lines, along roadsides and between rows of commercial pine trees. It’s covered in tiny, cobwebby hairs. It’s got a shape only a botanist could love. Pity the little-known, inelegantly named hairy rattleweed, or Baptisia arachnifera. It is one of the nation’s rarest plants, found in only two southeast Georgia counties and federally listed as an endangered species.  Learn more...

  • A longleaf pine stand with tall, narrow trees and a sparse understory
    Information icon Longleaf pines on Odell Byrd’s land in Chesterfield County, South Carolina, may someday be home to red-cockaded woodpeckers. Photo © Charles Babb, used with permission.

    South Carolina Partners for Fish and Wildlife restore red-cockaded woodpecker habitat

    February 14, 2020 | 3 minute read

    Good things can flow from all sorts of motivations. Odell Byrd did not start out wanting to establish new nesting areas for endangered red-cockaded woodpeckers. He had a few acres of land that his grandfather had originally bought after World War II, part of which had been a family farm at one time, and which now was too overgrown to hike through easily. “I wanted to thin out the undergrowth so I could walk through and enjoy my forest,” he said.  Learn more...

  • Three young longleaf pine trees growing in a larger forest
    Information icon Young longleaf pine at The Jones Center, also known as Ichauway. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    Woodpecker swap meet

    January 13, 2020 | 9 minute read

    Tallahassee, Florida — Will McDearman stood on a chair, raised his voice and beseeched the hundred or so wildlife officials gathered in a nondescript auditorium to offer up every woodpecker they could find. “Are all the birds on the table?” he asked. Murmurs of assent followed. McDearman, like an auctioneer, then ended the bidding that joined woodpecker donor with woodpecker donee. “Going once,” he said. “Going twice,” he said.  Learn more...

  • Boy scouts walk in a line through a young stand of pine trees.
    Information icon The Cape Fear Council of the Boy Scouts of America has been helping restore longleaf pine at a camp in North Carolina. Photo by Jacob Jay.

    Planting for the future

    January 8, 2020 | 5 minute read

    Reveille sounds. Long lines of uniformed Boy Scouts circle the flagpole. Pledges and singing follow. Out beyond this morning ritual, stately young longleaf pine trees proudly peek over swaying grasses. The Cape Fear Council of the Boy Scouts of America is restoring the longleaf pine ecosystem and awakening its rich history at Camp Bowers in eastern North Carolina. They are contributing to the goal of the America’s Longleaf Initiative to bring back an ecosystem that once spanned from Virginia to Texas, and in North Carolina supports unique wildlife such as the Venus flytrap, which is considered at risk in the wild.  Learn more...

  • A calm river banked on both sides by tall trees.
    Information icon Groton Plantation fronts 24 miles of the Savannah River. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    What the world used to look like

    December 11, 2019 | 8 minute read

    Estill, South Carolina — The descendants of John Winthrop, founder of the Massachusetts Bay Colony nearly 400 years ago, recently set aside 14,000 acres along the Savannah River that will forever remain undeveloped. It is the largest private conservation easement in South Carolina history. Its significance, though, goes well beyond the creation of a natural bulwark against overdevelopment and forest loss. A bevy of private, commercial, nonprofit and government donors, including the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, cobbled together the $12.  Learn more...

  • A man with a beard and a woman, both wearing glasses, smile for the camera at an outdoor event.
    Information icon Cheryl and Ron Babers Hagar have dedicated their retirement years to transforming 400 acres that have been in Cheryl’s family for four generations into a wildlife-friendly habit. Photo by Courtesy Cheryl and Ron Babers Hagar.

    An investment in wildlife

    December 5, 2019 | 5 minute read

    Cheryl Babers Hagar has never seen a red-cockaded woodpecker. Nor has she seen a Louisiana pinesnake, although if she sees one of those, she says she would prefer it to be with some distance between her and the reptile.  Learn more...

  • A beautiful salt marsh with palm and oak trees in the distance partially obscuring a white lighthouse
    Information icon A marsh at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Orville Allen, CC BY 2.0.

    Want to hunt a refuge? Fish a hatchery?

    November 7, 2019 | 8 minute read

    St. Marks, Florida — The slash pine forest is thick and overgrown, impenetrable due to walls of saw palmetto, gallberry and fetterbush. A hunter this season would more likely get lost in there than bag a whitetail. Next season, though, will be different. Dan Frisk, project leader for the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, stands by a deer stand used for the youth hunt each December on the refuge.  Learn more...

  • A small bird in hand with white patches on its wing and a red patch behind its eye
    Information icon A male red-cockaded woodpecker showing off the red feathers behind its head called a cockade. Photo © Robert B. Clontz, The Nature Conservancy.

    Joining forces

    August 27, 2019 | 7 minute read

    Fort Stewart, Georgia — As military partnerships go, this has to be one of the oddest, and strongest. The fighting men and women of the 3rd Infantry Division train alongside… red-cockaded woodpeckers. Ft. Stewart just west of Savannah and north of Hinesville, GA. Map by Roy Hewitt, USFWS. Soldiers maneuver the eastern edge of the army base under a canopy of longleaf pine where the iconic woodpeckers make their home.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A jet black snake with opaque white belly coiled up in the grass.
    Information icon Black pinesnake. Photo by Jim Lee, The Nature Conservancy.

    Black pinesnake final Critical Habitat designation

    February 25, 2020 | 6 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is finalizing designation of critical habitat for the black pinesnake, which is listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). What is the black pinesnake and where is it found? The black pinesnake is a large, nonvenomous snake, one of three subspecies of pinesnakes in the southeastern United States. These snakes are typically all black and may reach up to six feet in length.  Learn more...

News

  • A jet black snake with opaque white belly coiled up in the grass.
    Information icon Black pinesnake. Photo by Jim Lee, The Nature Conservancy.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service finalizes Critical Habitat for threatened black pinesnake

    February 25, 2020 | 3 minute read

    Daphne, Alabama — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has finalized critical habitat under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) for the black pinesnake, a non-venomous constrictor found only in Mississippi and Alabama. This native reptile was listed as threatened under the ESA in 2015 following population declines due to habitat loss and degradation. The black pinesnake is native to longleaf pine forests, one of the world’s most ecologically diverse natural places and one that is in peril.  Read the full story...

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