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Tag: Littlewing Pearlymussel

The content below has been tagged with the term “Littlewing Pearlymussel.”

Articles

  • Biologists work to clear the way for fish and other aquatic life

    November 28, 2007 | 3 minute read

    In an effort to help recover North Carolina’s only population of the spotfin chub, a threatened fish, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is leading a project to help open up new habitat for the fish in the Little Tennessee River basin. The spotfin chub was once thought to inhabit only the main stem of the Little Tennessee River, however a mass migration was documented in 1999, two miles up one of the river’s tributaries.  Learn more...

News

  • A small woodpecker perched on a pine tree.
    Information icon In 2018, there were 38 active clusters of endangered red-cockaded woodpeckers on this property in Alabama, thriving there under a Safe Harbor Agreement. Composite photo by Mark Bailey.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of 42 southeastern species

    August 3, 2018 | 7 minute read

    The red-cockaded woodpecker is one of 42 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife and plants that will get updated five-year status reviews conducted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in the months ahead. They are all found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before October 5, 2018. These five-year reviews, required by the Endangered Species Act (ESA) will ensure listing classifications under the ESA are accurate and recommend changes in status where appropriate based on the latest science and analysis.  Read the full story...

Podcasts

  • A mussel with fringe around its opening partially burried in the sand on the river bottom.
    Information icon Appalachian elktoe in the Little River Translyvania County NC. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Stream stewards

    December 2, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The importance of streams, in general, and especially here in the mountains, can’t be understated. For many they’re the source of drinking water, and here in the mountains they’re a key part of our outdoor recreation culture, which in turn fuels an outdoor recreation economy. In western North Carolina, our streams are home to three endangered species – the Appalachian elktoe mussel, the littlewing pearlymussel, and the spotfin chub – a tiny fish found in the Little Tennessee River.  Learn more...

  • A brownish/gold clam with horizontal striations.
    Information icon Asian clam (Corbicula fluminea). Photo by Derek Hudgins, CC BY-SA 2.0.

    Asian mussels in the Little Tennessee River

    November 27, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The Little Tennessee River between Franklin, North Carolina, and Fontana Reservoir is one of the best examples of a warm, Southern Appalachian river, with a surprising amount of its native fauna intact. Indeed, this stretch is home to three federally-protected animals- the Appalachian elktoe mussel, littlewing pearly mussel, and the spotfin chub, a tiny fish. State and federal biologists recently donned wetsuits, masks, and snorkels as part of an ongoing effort by the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission to keep tabs on the state of mussel populations in the river.  Learn more...

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