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Tag: Little Brown Bat

The content below has been tagged with the term “Little Brown Bat.”

Articles

  • A brown bat attached to the roof of a cave with white fuzz around its nose
    Information icon In this 2016 photo, a tri-colored bat with evidence of White Nose Syndrome (WNS) hibernates on the wall of the Black Diamond Tunnel in the North Georgia mountains. Photo by Pete Pattavina, USFWS.

    Malady deadly to bats found in North Carolina

    February 9, 2011 | 4 minute read

    White-nose syndrome, the disease that has killed hundreds of thousands of bats in the Eastern United States, has been discovered in a retired Avery County mine and in a cave at Grandfather Mountain State Park, marking the arrival of the disease in North Carolina. “White-nose syndrome is confirmed in Virginia and Tennessee, so we expected we would be one of the next states to see the disease,” said Gabrielle Graeter, a biologist with the N.  Learn more...

News

  • A brown bat attached to the roof of a cave with white fuzz around its nose
    Information icon In this 2016 photo, a tri-colored bat with evidence of White Nose Syndrome (WNS) hibernates on the wall of the Black Diamond Tunnel in the North Georgia mountains. Photo by Pete Pattavina, USFWS.

    White-nose syndrome decimates North Carolina’s bats

    April 29, 2013 | 4 minute read

    Biologists with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) have determined that white-nose syndrome (WNS) continues to decimate bat populations in western North Carolina, with some infected locations showing up to a 95 percent decline in hibernating bats over the past one to two years. The disease, which has been confirmed in seven counties in western North Carolina, does not affect people. Wildlife Commission biologists surveying bat populations have documented declining bat populations by site.  Read the full story...

Podcasts

  • A fuzzy bat bearing its teeth with white fungus covering its face.
    Information icon Little brown bat from Avery County with White Nose Syndrome. Photo by Gabrielle Graeter, NCWRC.

    White-nose syndrome in Kentucky

    May 1, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature In addition to horses and bourbon, Kentucky is known for its caves, and indeed, is home to Mammoth Cave National Park, with the world’s longest known cave system. Hand in hand with the incredible number of caves is the fact that Kentucky is an incredibly important state for our nation’s bat populations. That’s why the recent news that the bat disease white-nose syndrome was discovered in the state is especially painful.  Learn more...

  • A biologist wearing gloves extends a bats wings which shows signs of white fungus.
    Bat with white nose syndrome symptoms. Photo by Sue Cameron, USFWS

    White nose syndrome, a fatal bat condition, spreads

    May 8, 2009 | 3 minute read

    Transcript Good morning and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. This week, we’ll look at a mysterious condition killing thousands of bats in the Northeast that biologists hope to keep from spreading to the Southern Appalachians. Last winter, biologists found several thousand dead bats in caves around Albany, New York. A majority of the dead bats had a white fungal growth on their noses, giving the condition the name white nose syndrome.  Learn more...

  • A small bat with white powder around its nose covered in tiny water droplets.
    Little brown bat with white-nose syndrome. Photo by Jonathan Mays, ME Dept. of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife.

    White nose syndrome strikes bats in the Northeast

    October 5, 2008 | 3 minute read

    Transcript Good morning and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. This week, we’ll look at a mysterious condition killing thousands of bats in the Northeast that biologists hope to keep from spreading to the Southern Appalachians. Last winter, biologists found several thousand dead bats in caves around Albany, New York. A majority of the dead bats had a white fungal growth on their noses, giving the condition the name white nose syndrome.  Learn more...

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