skip to content

Tag: Law Enforcement

The content below has been tagged with the term “Law Enforcement.”

News

  • A manatee partially covered in algae looks directly into the camera surrounded by a school of fish.
    Manatee. Photo by S. Whitecraft, USFWS.

    Service proposes broadened Florida manatee protections in Kings Bay

    June 21, 2011 | 7 minute read

    The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) announced today a proposal to expand federal protection areas for manatees in Citrus County, Florida, by creating a manatee refuge including all of Kings Bay in Crystal River. The proposed area of the Kings Bay manatee refuge has not changed from what was identified in the emergency designation. The manatee refuge would include all waters of Kings Bay, its tributaries and adjoining water bodies upstream of the confluence of Kings Bay and Crystal River.  Read the full story...

  • A group of manatees swims near the surface of clear blue water.
    Manatees swim close to the surface and frequently come up for air. Credit: Jim Reid, USFWS.

    Habitual manatee zone violator sentenced for killing a manatee in Brevard County, Florida

    April 2, 2011 | 3 minute read

    A Merritt Island man, who has been repeatedly cited for violating Manatee Protection Speed Zones in Brevard and Volusia Counties, was sentenced in federal court today for killing a West Indian manatee while operating his boat in violation of a manatee protection zone. After an extensive joint investigation by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), Joseph F. Miata Jr.  Read the full story...

  • Four young whooping cranes look for food on a muddy bank.
    Juvenile Whooping Cranes Forage on Wheeler NWR. Photo by Bill Gates, USFWS.

    Second whooping crane found dead at Weiss Lake, Alabama

    February 18, 2011 | 4 minute read

    Federal investigators have discovered the remains of a second whooping crane at Weiss Lake on the Alabama-Georgia border. The second crane, identified as #22-10, a crane released last year in Wisconsin in the company of other older cranes, was found less than a quarter-mile from whooping crane #12-04. Investigators believe #12-04 was shot sometime before January 28, and consider the deaths linked. Laboratory results are still pending. A hefty reward now stands at $23,250, a combined total contributed by 18 non-governmental organizations, federal agencies, and private individuals for additional information on the deaths of the two whooping cranes leading to successful prosecution of the perpetrator(s).  Read the full story...

  • A bald eagle flying straight at the camera in front of a bright blue sky.
    Bald eagle at Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Neil Mishler, USFWS.

    Reward offered for information about bald eagle shooting in Tennessee

    May 6, 2010 | 2 minute read

    TIPTONVILLE, TN - The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency are investigating the shooting of a bald eagle in the Reelfoot area of Lake County. A reward of up to $3,300 is offered to anyone for information leading to a conviction of the person or persons responsible for shooting the eagle. The reward is provided from contributions by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and the Mid-South Raptor Center.  Read the full story...

Podcasts

  • A low-growing green plant with a flower forming.
    Ginseng flower forming. Photo by Forest Farming, CC BY-ND 2.0.

    Ginseng trade conviction

    June 20, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Following a four-day trial in U.S. District Court, a jury convicted Johnny Carl Grooms of Cosby, Tennessee, of conspiring to distribute oxycodone and cocaine, interstate travel to further drug trafficking, possession of oxycodone with the intent to distribute, distribution of cocaine, possession of firearms by a convicted felon, and illegally trafficking in ginseng. Grooms’s sentencing is set for October 3, and he faces up to life in prison as well as fines of over $8 million.  Learn more...

  • Dead bald eagle discovered

    June 13, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. A dead bald eagle was discovered on Wednesday, May 4th at the Maggie Valley Festival Grounds located on Soco Road, US Highway 19 in Maggie Valley, North Carolina. An examination revealed the eagle had been recently shot and bullet fragments were removed from the carcass. The eagle was immature and lacked the characteristic adult white head and tail feathers which usually come in by the 6th year.  Learn more...

  • Bright red flowers emerge from a bog with a forest in the background.
    Mountain sweet pitcher plant patch in Butt CPA. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Southern Appalachian poaching

    January 30, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. It seems this winter has seen a flurry of activity in the capture and prosecution of wildlife smugglers. In mid-December a German man was arrested for smuggling hundreds of live tarantulas, including protected species, into the United States through the U.S. mail. In late December two smugglers plead guilty to breaking federal law in connection to their attempt to smuggle Cuban pigeon eggs into the country, running the risk of bringing avian disease into the United States.  Learn more...

  • Two bright white birds with red patches on their face and long slender legs standing in the a dormant grassy field.
    Information icon Whooping cranes. Photo by D. Serverson, USFWS.

    Whooping crane deaths

    January 17, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature I recently spoke about a flock of critically endangered whooping cranes flying across a corner of the Southern Appalachians on their way from Wisconsin to Florida. Things were going well for the small group of birds, except for one who was hampered by a leg injury, but still had a long and healthy life ahead of him as a breeding, education, or research bird.  Learn more...

  • A river runs through a valley in fall.
    Little Tennessee River. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    In-stream flows

    January 10, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. For years the water in western North Carolina’s Cheoah River was collected and piped overland to a power station on the neighboring Little Tennessee River, leaving behind a river bed fed by a trickle of water coming through the dam and water flowing in from downstream tributaries. One of the great conservation success stories of recent years has been the return of flow to that dewatered stretch of river, a commitment made by Alcoa as part of the deal struck to allow them to continue using the river to generate electricity.  Learn more...

  • A low-growing green plant with a flower forming.
    Ginseng flower forming. Photo by Forest Farming, CC BY-ND 2.0.

    Charges of trafficking in ginseng

    September 8, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. One of my oldest daughter’s first camping trips was to the Cosby section of Great Smoky Mountains National Park. It was a delightful weekend, early in the season before the campground had become crowded. As a gateway to the Smokies, Cosby is a little off the beaten path and the area definitely locks the commercial development of Gatlinburg or Cherokee, offering up a far more subdued experience with low-key groceries and tourist offerings perhaps a little reminiscent of an earlier age in mountain tourism.  Learn more...

Contact Us:

Looking for a media contact? Reach out to a regional spokesperson.

Share this page

Tweet this page on Twitter or follow @USFWSsoutheast

Share this page on Facebook or follow USFWSsoutheast.

LinkedIn

Share this page on LinkedIn