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Tag: Laurel Dace

The content below has been tagged with the term “Laurel Dace.”

Articles

  • An employee in a neon yellow shirt helps guide a heavy machine operator.
    Information icon Cory Gullett (USFWS), a member of the Aquatic Habitat Restoration Team, helps to position the new culvert into place as it is lifted by an excavator. Photo by Bryan Watkins, USFWS.

    Culvert repair partnership in Tennessee a win-win for landowner, endangered fish

    October 24, 2017 | 3 minute read

    The little laurel dace, which grows to less than two inches long, is a freshwater minnow found in only six small streams on Walden’s Ridge, part of the Cumberland Plateau in central Tennessee. The federally endangered laurel dace. Photo by Conservation Fisheries, Inc. During their breeding season in May and June, both males and females exhibit stunning colors of black, gold, silver, and red. The laurel dace lives in pools and slow runs in clear, cool streams that are surrounded by dense riverbanks covered in mountain laurel.  Learn more...

News

  • A low growing shrub with bright purple flowers.
    Information icon Endangered Pyne’s ground-plum. Photo by NPS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of 35 Southeastern species

    May 7, 2018 | 5 minute read

    As part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of 35 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife, and plants. These species are found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before July 6, 2018. These five-year reviews will ensure listing classifications under the ESA are accurate and recommend changes in status where appropriate based on the latest science and analysis.  Read the full story...

  • A sloped, rocky stream in winter.
    Stream in Rhea, TN. Photo by Chris Morris CC BY 2.0.

    Recovery plan available for endangered laurel dace

    November 10, 2016 | 4 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is announcing the final Recovery Plan for the laurel dace, a federally listed endangered fish. The laurel dace is a small fish native to the Tennessee River Basin in Tennessee that survives in three creek systems on the Walden Ridge of the Cumberland Plateau. Only a few individuals have been found from headwaters of two creek systems in the southern part of its range, Soddy and Sale creeks, while laurel dace are more abundant in headwaters of the Piney River system in its northern range.  Read the full story...

  • A sloped, rocky stream in winter.
    Stream in Rhea, TN. Photo by Chris Morris CC BY 2.0.

    Draft recovery plan for endangered laurel dace available for review

    January 14, 2015 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is seeking public comment on the Technical/Agency Draft Recovery Plan for the laurel dace, a federally listed, endangered fish. Public comments will be accepted on this draft recovery plan until March 16, 2015. Listed as endangered in 2011, the laurel dace is a small fish native to the Tennessee River Basin in Tennessee. The dace is found in three creek systems on the Walden Ridge of the Cumberland Plateau in Bledsoe, Rhea, and Sequatchie Counties.  Read the full story...

  • Biologists check a seine for chucky madtom fishes.
    Search for chucky madtom in Little Chucky Creek, Tennessee. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Service identifies habitat essential to five endangered southeastern fishes

    October 15, 2012 | 3 minute read

    After reviewing and incorporating information from the public and the scientific community, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today identified approximately 228 river miles and 29 acres of critical habitat in, Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama; and Arkansas, that contain aquatic habitat essential to the conservation of the Cumberland darter, rush darter, yellowcheek darter, Chucky madtom, and laurel dace, five species of fish protected by the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The critical habitat designation includes areas in McCreary and Whitley counties, Kentucky; Campbell, Scott, Bledsoe, Rhea, Sequatchie, and Greene counties, Tennessee; Etowah, Jefferson, and Winston counties, Alabama; and Cleburne, Searcy, Stone, and Van Buren counties, Arkansas.  Read the full story...

Podcasts

  • Biologists crowd around a seine.
    Services biologists search through a seine for signs of Chucky madtom. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Appalachian fish added to endangered species list

    September 12, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Little Chucky Creek flows through scenic farmland of eastern Tennessee. Looking at it, you would never guess it’s the only place in the world where a tiny catfish, the Chucky madtom, lives. In fact, in the past 11 years, only three individuals have been found. Come September 8th, the madtom and three other Appalachian fish will be placed on the federal endangered species list.  Learn more...

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