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Tag: Kentucky

The content below has been tagged with the term “Kentucky.”

Events

  • An instructor works one-on-one with a a young boy
    Information icon A junior gets some one-on-one fly fishing instruction. Photo by USFWS.

    September fly fishing clinic

    September 14, 2019 10:00 - 3:00 CDT

    Sessions

    • Morning session: casting technique, 10:00 - 12:00 CDT
    • Afternoon session: fishing the creek, 1:00 - 3:00 CDT

    Description Join professional volunteer fly fisherman, Mark Lamberth, for a free, basic instruction of fly fishing open to anyone ages 8+. Mark has over 50 years of experience fly fishing in over 42 states with loads of enthusiasm to share. The morning session will cover beginning casting. In the afternoon, particpants will begin fishing the creek. Location Meet at the Wolf Creek NFH visitor center at least 15 minutes before the session.  Learn more...

Wildlife

  • A photograph of the outside and inside of a ring pink shell next to a ruler for scale.  Shell is approximately 3 inches wide.
    Information icon Ring pink. Photo by Leroy Koch, USFWS.

    Ring pink

    The orangefoot pimpleback is a mussel found in Alabama, Illinois, Kentucky and Tennessee rivers.  Visit the species profile...

  • A close up photo of a yellow mussel shell
    Information icon Adult rough pigtoe in the Green River in Kentucky. Photo by Monte McGregor, Center Mollusk Conservation, Kentucky DFWR.

    Rough pigtoe

    The rough pigtoe is a medium sized mussel, dark to yellowish brown in color, that is native to the Ohio River system. It is found in Alabama, Indiana, Kentucky and Virginia, with experimental populations in Tennessee, and is protected as an endangered species.  Visit the species profile...

  • Two tan colored mussels with dark striations eminating from their base on rocky substrate
    Information icon Tan riffleshells, male on the left; female on the right. Public domain photo by Dick Biggins.

    Tan riffleshell

    The tan riffleshell (Epioblasma florentina walkeri) is a medium sized freshwater mussel that has been listed under the threatened and endangered species list since 1977. It is a filter feeding mollusc found within isolated populations primarily in Virginia and Tennessee.  Visit the species profile...

  • Five white swans with black feet and a black beak in flight in winter
    Information icon Tundra swans on the wing at Tennessee National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by USFWS.

    Tundra swan

    Taxon: Anseriformes, Anatidae Range: Tundra swans breed primarily in Alaska and northern Canada and winter on the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of the United States. The eastern population migrates southeast to coastal areas from Delaware to North Carolina, while the western population migrates south to the Pacific Northwest and several inland areas. Status: Not listed, low concern – Continental population sizes exceed 200,000, and populations appear to have been increasing since the early 1980s.  Visit the species profile...

  • White flowers with many stamen burst from a shrub much like a hydrangea bush
    Information icon Virginia spiraea, Walker County, Georgia. Photo © Alan Cressler, used with permission.

    Virginia spiraea

    The Virginia spiraea is found in the Appalachian Plateaus or the southern Blue Ridge Mountains in Alabama, Ohio, West Virginia, Virginia, Tennessee, North Carolina, Kentucky, and Georgia.  Visit the species profile...

  • Leafy green vegetation with bright yellow flowers
    White-haired goldenrod. Photo: John MacGregor, Kentucky Dept. of Fish and Wildlife Resources

    White-haired goldenrod

    The white-haired goldenrod is a unique plant to the Red River Gorge region of eastern Kentucky. The Red River Gorge is well known for its unique geology, scenic beauty, and outdoor recreational opportunities, and much of the area is located within the Daniel Boone National Forest.  Visit the species profile...

  • A duck with long green and brown feathers on its head in the shape of a backwards-hat
    Information icon A wood duck at Lake Woodruff National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Robin Koch, USFWS volunteer.

    Wood duck

    Taxon: Anseriformes, Anatidae Range: Wood ducks are common year-round in the Southeastern United States and during summer and autumn throughout the Eastern United States and Canada. Wood ducks breed in most states east of the Rocky Mountains and throughout the Pacific Northwest, but they migrate from northern states and provinces to southern areas during early fall. Status: Not listed, low concern – Although breeding population estimates are not available for wood ducks based on breeding surveys, perhaps as many as 3 million breeding pairs exist across North America.  Visit the species profile...

Wolf-Creek

  • A sign for the visitor and environmental education center.
    Information icon Welcome to Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery. Photo by Robert H Pos, USFWS.

    Visitor/Environmental Education Center

    Come face to face with the region’s underwater friends, explore karst terrain, see the inner workings of an active honey bee hive, and meet Dale, the lifelike animatronic fish biologist—all by stepping into the unique and exciting exhibit hall at the Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery Visitor/Environmental Education Center. Much more awaits the entire family in a fun and engaging educational journey through the center—located on a working trout hatchery at the base of Wolf Creek Dam and beautiful Lake Cumberland.  Learn more...

  • A sign for the visitor and environmental education center.
    Information icon Welcome to Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery. Photo by Robert H Pos, USFWS.

    Web cams

    Hatchery Creek Raceways  Learn more...

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