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Tag: Kentucky

The content below has been tagged with the term “Kentucky.”

News

  • A brown and black mussel with striations.
    Sheepnose mussel. Photo by Kristen Lundh, USFWS.

    Service proposes Endangered Species Act protection for two freshwater mussels

    January 19, 2011 | 2 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed Endangered Species Act protection for the sheepnose and the spectaclecase, two freshwater mussels found in river systems in the eastern half of the United States. Sheepnose are currently found in Alabama, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. The sheepnose occurs in 24 streams, down from 77, a 69 percent decline. Very few of these populations are known to be reproducing.  Read the full story...
  • Four young whooping cranes with bands on their legs rest in a net enclosure.
    Juvenile Whooping Cranes in their holding pen at Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge, Decatur, AL. Photo by USFWS.

    Ultralight migration leads 20 endangered whooping cranes over the skies of Alabama

    December 17, 2010 | 4 minute read

    Twenty juvenile whooping cranes reached Franklin County, Alabama, on December 17, 2009, on their ultralight-guided migration from Necedah National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in central Wisconsin to Chassahowitzka and St. Marks National Wildlife Refuges along Floridas Gulf Coast. These majestic birds, the tallest in North America, left Necedah refuge on October 23, following Operation Migration’s four ultralight aircraft. Alabama is one of the seven states the ultralight-guided migration will fly over before reaching Florida.  Read the full story...
  • Long white birds flying in formation behind a fan powered glider.
    Information icon We hope for a tremendous viewing audience for this amazing spectacle! Photo by Nick Baldwin, a refuge volunteer from last years flyover.

    Ninth group of endangered whooping cranes depart on ultralight-guided flight to Florida

    October 22, 2009 | 5 minute read

    Twenty young whooping cranes have begun their ultralight-led migration from central Wisconsin’s Necedah National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). This is the ninth group of birds to take part in a landmark project led by the Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership (WCEP), an international coalition of public and private groups that is reintroducing this highly imperiled species in eastern North America, part of its historical range. There are now approximately 77 whooping cranes in the wild in eastern North America thanks to WCEP’s efforts.  Read the full story...
  • A prehistoric looking brown fish in a hand with a shovel shaped face.
    Shovelnose sturgeon. Photo by Eli Cureton, USFWS.

    Fish and Wildlife Service proposes Endangered Species Act protection for the shovelnose sturgeon

    September 22, 2009 | 4 minute read

    The Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is proposing to treat the shovelnose sturgeon as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (Act) due to its similarity of appearance to the endangered pallid sturgeon. The Service is also proposing a special rule that would prohibit harvest of flesh or roe of shovelnose sturgeon and shovelnose–pallid sturgeon hybrids when associated with a commercial fishing activity. The pallid sturgeon was listed as an endangered species in 1990.  Read the full story...
  • Six people wearing life preservers on a boat.
    People enjoying a boat. Photo by Greg Workman, FWC.

    Secretary Salazar announces boating grants to 28 states to help keep waterways clean

    June 9, 2009 | 7 minute read

    Department of the Interior Secretary Ken Salazar today announced that $14.6 million will be awarded to 28 states under the Clean Vessel Act grant program in 2009. The grants will be used to fund the construction and installation of sewage pumpout facilities and floating restrooms, to purchase pumpout boats and provide educational programs for recreational boaters. “Clean Vessel Act funds support construction of facilities in communities that depend on recreational boating for their economy, and depend on clean water for their health,” said Salazar.  Read the full story...

Podcasts

  • A fuzzy bat bearing its teeth with white fungus covering its face.
    Little brown bat from Avery County with White Nose Syndrome. Photo by Gabrielle Graeter, NCWRC.

    White-nose syndrome in Kentucky

    May 1, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature In addition to horses and bourbon, Kentucky is known for its caves, and indeed, is home to Mammoth Cave National Park, with the world’s longest known cave system. Hand in hand with the incredible number of caves is the fact that Kentucky is an incredibly important state for our nation’s bat populations. That’s why the recent news that the bat disease white-nose syndrome was discovered in the state is especially painful.  Learn more...
  • A hand holds a small grey and silver fish
    Blackside dace. Photo by Brian Wulker, CC BY-NC 2.0.

    Contamination hurts Appalachian streams

    January 26, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Sadly, we often hear about the abuse of our public streams – from the coal-ash pond failure in East Tennessee, to recent wastewater treatment plant failings across western North Carolina, to high mercury levels in fish in Lake Fontana. These problems degrade water quality, which impairs our ability to enjoy and use the river – from tubing and fishing to revival baptisms.  Learn more...
  • A fuzzy bat bearing its teeth with white fungus covering its face.
    Little brown bat from Avery County with White Nose Syndrome. Photo by Gabrielle Graeter, NCWRC.

    Southern Appalachians face white nose syndrome

    July 10, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. White nose syndrome, an affliction of unknown origin that is fatal to bats, has been confirmed in two Virginia counties, the first cases in the Southern Appalachians. First documented in New York in 2006, WNS has killed tens of thousands of bats as it spread north and south. The affliction takes its name from the white-tufts of fungus that often grow on the muzzles of infected bats, however, it’s unknown if this fungus is the cause of the problem or merely taking advantage of a diseased and weakened bat.  Learn more...

Wildlife

  • A lobster-shaped and colored crayfish with tinges of rust and blue.
    Big Sandy crayfish. Photo by Zachary Loughman, West Liberty University.

    Big Sandy crayfish

    The Big Sandy crayfish is a threatened freshwater crustacean found in streams and rivers in the Appalachian region.  Visit the species profile...
  • A small fish with dark stripes on a yellow tinged back and white belly.
    Information icon Blackfin sucker. Photo by Matthew Thomas, KDFWR.

    Blackfin sucker

    A small fish averaging about five and a half inches in length, the blackfin sucker has a body patterned with two dark, brownish-black horizontal lines below the lateral line (a faint line of sense organs extending from the gill cover to the tail) and six or seven additional lines in the back and the side of the body, with intervening olive-gold stripes.  Visit the species profile...

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