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Tag: Kentucky

The content below has been tagged with the term “Kentucky.”

Articles

  • Water cascades about a dozen feet down the dam, which stretches 100 yards across the Green River. A sunny day, with flowers in the shot, and the river is rocky.
    Information icon Water cascades about a dozen feet down the dam, which stretches 100 yards across the Green River. Photo by Mark Davis.

    Going, going…

    July 1, 2021 | 4 minute read

    Woodbury, Kentucky – Federal, state and local environmentalists are preparing to do what more than a century of rushing water has not achieved: Demolish a lock and dam. It will change a stretch of the Green River forever. Officials from practically every level of government gathered Monday, June 28, to take a last look at lock and dam No. 5, a half-hour drive from Bowling Green. The dam, 100 yards across, and the lock, which is 120 yards long, are the latest Green River structures whose days are numbered.  Learn more...

Faq

  • Two small white birds with yellow beaks and black marking on head on the beach
    Information icon Interior least terns. Photo by USFWS

    Removal of interior least tern from the list of endangered and threatened wildlife - Questions and answers

    January 11, 2021 | 6 minute read

    What is an interior least tern? Least terns are the smallest members of the tern family. Terns are generally considered seabirds, but several species are also found along rivers, lakes, or other wetlands. The interior least tern is a migratory bird species, nesting along freshwater habitats of the Missouri and Mississippi rivers and their major tributaries and overwintering in the Caribbean and South America. Least terns feed primarily on small fish.  Learn more...

  • A blackish/navy blue bird with bright red eyes and white markings on its wings
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo by Christy Hand, SCDNR.

    Eastern black rail - final 4(d) rule

    October 7, 2020 | 5 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), has broad authority to issue regulations for the conservation of threatened species. The ESA provides a specific list of prohibitions for endangered species under section 9, but does not automatically provide these same prohibitions to threatened species. Section 4(d) of the ESA allows the Service to establish prohibitions or exceptions to prohibitions for threatened species. The intent of any 4(d) rule is to provide for the conservation of a threatened species by allowing regulatory flexibility under the ESA.  Learn more...

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

    Eastern black rail final listing as a threatened species

    October 7, 2020 | 14 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is finalizing a rule to protect the eastern black rail, a small secretive marsh bird native to the United States, as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Partially migratory, the eastern black rail is historically known to exist in 35 states east of the Rocky Mountains, Puerto Rico, Canada, Brazil and several countries in the Caribbean and Central America.  Learn more...

News

  • A parrot mid-flight with vibrant green feathers, with blue feathering on the tip of the wings. And red feathers above the beak
    Information icon Puerto Rican Parrot in flight. Photo by Jan Paul Zegarra, Biologist, USFWS

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Conducts Five-year Status Reviews of 37 Southeastern Species

    July 13, 2021 | 3 minute read

    As part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of 37 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife, and plants. These species are primarily found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico, but are also known to occur in Delaware, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, Texas, and Virginia. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before September 13, 2021.  Read the full story...

  • A low growing grass-like plant not currently in bloom.
    Information icon Kentucky glade cress. Photo by Bryan Siders CC BY 2.0.

    Four draft recovery plans available for public review and comment

    March 25, 2021 | 2 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announces the availability for public review and comment of draft recovery plans for the reticulated and frosted flatwoods salamanders, the fluted kidneyshell, and the Kentucky glade cress. These endangered or threatened species are in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia. The draft recovery plans include specific recovery objectives and criteria based on Species Status Assessments or SSAs. The Service is requesting review and comment on these draft recovery plans from local, State, and Federal agencies, nongovernmental organizations, Tribes, and the public.  Read the full story...

  • A forest composed of many small trees and a grassy/shrub understory
    Information icon A forested section of the proposed Green River National Wildlife Refuge and Conservation Partnership Area. Photo by Lee Andrews, USFWS.

    National Refuge adds 400-plus acres in Kentucky

    February 11, 2021 | 3 minute read

    The nation’s youngest national wildlife refuge has just grown by more than 400 acres, opening the way for increased recreational opportunities for people who love the outdoors. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) acquired 437 acres of forested wetlands in western Kentucky. It is now part of the Green River National Wildlife Refuge, created in November 2019. The newly acquired land is near John James Audubon State Park.  Read the full story...

  • Two small white birds with yellow beaks and black marking on head on the beach
    Information icon Interior least terns. Photo by USFWS

    Trump Administration celebrates recovery of America’s smallest tern

    January 11, 2021 | 6 minute read

    After more than three decades of conservation partnerships inspired by the Endangered Species Act, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is celebrating the delisting of the interior least tern due to recovery. According to the best available science, the diverse efforts of local, state and federal stakeholders across the interior least tern’s 18-state range have helped ensure populations are healthy, stable and increasing into the foreseeable future. The tern will continue to be protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.  Read the full story...

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

    Service finalizes listing the eastern black rail as threatened under the Endangered Species Act

    October 7, 2020 | 4 minute read

    The eastern black rail, a small, secretive marsh bird historically known to exist in 35 states east of the Rocky Mountains, Puerto Rico, Canada, Brazil, and several countries in the Caribbean and Central America, will be listed as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The final listing includes a rule that will help ensure beneficial conservation actions continue, while minimizing impacts to landowners and other stakeholders. Critical habitat designation for the eastern black rail was deemed not prudent.  Read the full story...

Wolf-Creek

  • A sign for the visitor and environmental education center.
    Information icon Welcome to Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery. Photo by Robert H Pos, USFWS.

    Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery

    Although most hatchery lands and outdoor spaces have remained open for the public to enjoy, we ask that you Recreate Responsibly. Check local conditions on this website and call ahead for current information. Operations vary based on local public health conditions. Consistent with CDC recommendations, people who are not fully vaccinated must continue to wear masks indoors and in crowded outdoor spaces. Most importantly, stay home if you feel sick and continue to watch for symptoms of COVID-19 and follow CDC guidance on how to protect yourself and others.  Learn more...

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