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Tag: Kemps Ridley Sea Turtle

The content below has been tagged with the term “Kemps Ridley Sea Turtle.”

Articles

  • A beach covered in sea turtle eggs and other debris washed ashore from Hurricane Dorian
    Information icon Debris and sea turtle eggs washed up by Hurricane Dorian at Archie Carr NWR. Photo by Erin Seney, UCF Marine Turtle Research Group.

    Dorian report: Sea-turtle nest losses could have been worse

    September 19, 2019 | 5 minute read

    Hurricane Dorian obliterated hundreds of sea-turtle nests at National Wildlife Refuges as it clawed north along the Atlantic coast earlier this month, officials with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) said. But it could have been much worse. The storm, wildlife refuge staff noted, had dissipated as it neared the fragile, sandy shores where turtles lay eggs. It obliterated some nests, but left others intact. Eroded sand dunes and a lost sea turtle egg at Archie Carr National Wildlife Refuge.  Learn more...

  • Two people work together to lift a large sea turtle next to a wheelbarrow.
    Information icon Jeff Schlafke and Anna Clark from Panama City but working in Cape San Blas, Gulf County, Florida where the stunned turtle event occurred. Photo by USFWS.

    Service helps sea turtles hit by Florida freeze

    January 8, 2018 | 2 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service helped rescue hundreds of near-frozen sea turtles during Florida’s recent cold snap. Roughly 900 threatened or endangered turtles, mostly green turtles, but including Kemp’s Ridleys and loggerheads, were pulled from the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean as water temperatures dropped below 50 degrees. Most were taken to the Gulf World Marine Institute in Panama City Beach where they were warmed up and fed, according to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.  Learn more...

  • A tiny loggerhead hatchling hustles towards the ocean.
    Loggerhead hatchling meets ocean. Photo by Becky Skiba, USFWS.

    Moonlighting in Alabama

    November 6, 2017 | 5 minute read

    Lisa was keeping a watchful eye on a sea turtle nest, which laid beneath the sand. A Share the Beach volunteer for more than 16 years, Graham knew the routine: a female sea turtle nested in that spot two months ago, which meant the eggs could hatch at any time.  Learn more...

Infographic

  • Hurricane Irma and sea turtles

    This infographic discusses the impact of hurricanes in Florida during sea turtle nesting season, and asks that you never touch any exposed eggs or disturbed nests. Although nearly 90 percent of sea turtle nesting in the United States occurs in Florida in March through October, a major hurricane there during this period doesn’t mean all is lost. Mother sea turtles “hedge their bets” by depositing eggs in several nests over the course of the season, so there is a high probability that at least a few of the nests will incubate successfully even if a serious storm hits.  Learn more...

News

  • Kemps ridley sea turtle laying in the sand. Large with grey shell and yellow body with grey speckles.
    Kemps ridley sea turtle. Photo by NER Sea Turtle Stranding Network.

    New report assesses the impacts of emerging threats on Gulf coast species and ecosystems

    November 13, 2015 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today released its Gulf Coast Vulnerability Assessment (GCVA), a comprehensive report that evaluates the effects of climate change, sea level rise and urbanization on four Gulf Coast ecosystems and 11 species that depend on them. The ecosystems are mangrove, oyster reef, tidal emergent marsh and barrier islands. The species are roseate spoonbill, blue crab, clapper rail, mottled duck, spotted seatrout, eastern oyster, American oystercatcher, red drum, black skimmer, Kemp’s ridley sea turtle and Wilson’s plover.  Read the full story...

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