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Tag: Invasive Species

The content below has been tagged with the term “Invasive Species.”

Articles

  • A tiny turtle in the palm of a hand.
    Information icon A tiny bog turtle. Photo by Rosie Walunas, USFWS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service gives $115,000 to help Mitchell and Yancey County streams

    October 22, 2008 | 2 minute read

    The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (Service) recently announced it’s awarding $115,000 in grants to improve water and stream quality and help ensure fish and other aquatic life can freely move up and downstream in the Upper Nolichucky River Basin, “The Upper Nolichucky River is a priority focus area for conservation and the Service remains committed to helping local people and local organizations restore and protect it,” said Anita Goetz, a biologist with the Service.  Learn more...

Podcasts

  • A quickly spreading grass.
    Exotic invasive Japanese stiltgrass. Photo by NY State IPM Program at Cornell University, CC BY 2.0.

    Invasive exotic species - Japaneses stilt-grass

    December 3, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings, and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Invasive species management is an on-going challenge for land managers as there always seem to be new or spreading outbreaks. On a recent afternoon, biologists working at a bog in Henderson County actually experimented with using a shop-vacuum to remove Japanese stilt-grass seeds, sadly to no avail. Also called Nepalese browntop or by its genus name, microstegium, in the United States, this Asian plant was first seen in the Knoxville area around 1919, and its suspected it was used as packing material for porcelain.  Learn more...

  • Leafy green plant
    Japanese knotweed. Photo by USFWS.

    Japanese knotweed

    May 29, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Invasive species are plants and animals that are not from here but have been introduced and are thriving in the absence of their natural controls, to the detriment of our native species. Their impacts is especially notable in the Southern Appalachians, as they’re responsible for the loss of the American chestnut, the current decline of hemlock trees, and patches of kudzu across the region.  Learn more...

  • Leafy green vine climbs over and consumes everything in its path.
    Kudzu. Photo by Frank DiBona, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    Kudzu

    May 22, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Yancey County’s South Toe River is one of the most beautiful in the Southern Appalachians. Its headwaters are protected by Pisgah National Forest and Mount Mitchell State Park and it flows through a sparsely developed landscape all the way to its confluence with the North Toe River. That isn’t to say the river is without its threats. One of those is visible from the highway 19 bridge over the stream.  Learn more...

  • A white fuzz developing along the stems of a pine tree.
    Hemlock woolly adelgid, an exotic insect pest. Photo by Nicholas A. Tonelli, CC BY 2.0.

    Combating invasive exotic plants in the Southern Appalachians

    May 15, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Invasive exotic species are plants and animals that are not from here but have been introduced and are thriving in the absence of their natural controls, to the detriment of our native species. Kudzu is perhaps the most famous of these, a Japanese plant widely planted in the last century, but there are a host of others, including the chestnut blight that removed chestnuts from our Appalachian forests, the balsam woolly adelgid which has killed Fraser firs on our highest mountaintops, and the hemlock woolly adelgid which is killing hemlock trees.  Learn more...

  • A dark brown hog in tall, dry grass.
    Feral hog. Photo by Don McCullough, CC BY-NC 2.0.

    Feral hog trapping

    November 21, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. We wanted to get to a remote section of Great Smoky Mountains National Park to do some bat work. To get there by land would require going by foot nearly the entire way and turn a day’s worth of work into a three-day expedition. However, going by boat cuts out all that leg work. The Smokies has a program to control feral hogs, and we were able to catch a ride with a couple of their hog control staff traveling by boat to their work area.  Learn more...

  • Triangular green leaves with sharp, throny vines.
    Information icon Mile-a-minute weed. Photo by John Beetham, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0.

    Mile a minute weed

    October 6, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. In late July, scientists from Appalachian State University published some unfortunate news. The plant Persicaria perfoliata was in North Carolina. Known by the common name mile-a-minute weed, this invasive plant from Asia can grow nearly six inches a day. The scientists found the plant growing in North Carolina’s Alleghany County, which borders Virginia. Although it has been seen in isolated locations in the Pacific Northwest, it’s suspected that the cooler climate prevents it from becoming naturalized there.  Learn more...

  • A brownish/gold clam with horizontal striations.
    Information icon Asian clam (Corbicula fluminea). Photo by Derek Hudgins, CC BY-SA 2.0.

    Asian mussels in the Little Tennessee River

    November 27, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The Little Tennessee River between Franklin, North Carolina, and Fontana Reservoir is one of the best examples of a warm, Southern Appalachian river, with a surprising amount of its native fauna intact. Indeed, this stretch is home to three federally-protected animals- the Appalachian elktoe mussel, littlewing pearly mussel, and the spotfin chub, a tiny fish. State and federal biologists recently donned wetsuits, masks, and snorkels as part of an ongoing effort by the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission to keep tabs on the state of mussel populations in the river.  Learn more...

  • A white/grey bird with black markings on its head and throat.
    Chickadee. Photo by Tim Lenz, CC BY 2.0.

    State of the birds

    July 17, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The children on our street often congregate in the yard with the best play set, but recently the bright yellow slide in the yard was ruled off limits. Not because it isn’t safe, rather a chickadee made a nest in a birch stump next to the base of the slide. Chickadees are one of a handful of Eastern forest birds that successfully adapt to urban and suburban areas, however the situation has not been as good for many birds over the past forty years.  Learn more...

  • Triangular green leaves with sharp, throny vines.
    Mile-a-minute weed. Photo by John Beetham, CC BY-NC-SA 2.0.

    Tearthumb - a fascinating if painful wetland plant

    March 20, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Immediately before heading out into the field, I went over the list of gear – food, water, first aid kit, rubber boots. I had everything. Except the long-sleeved shirt. Not a big deal, I thought. I had the most important things. And I did. But marching through the muck of a Southern Appalachian bog, the long-sleeve shirt would’ve been nice.  Learn more...

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