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Tag: Invasive Species

The content below has been tagged with the term “Invasive Species.”

Articles

  • A group of seven people crouching on a beach while holding a 16 foot python.
    Information icon Irula tribesmen from India have been helping state and federal officials in Florida capture invasive pythons. This 16-foot female turned up in a disused bunker at a closed missile site at Crocodile Lake National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Ed Metzger, University of Florida.

    Pythons nose their way into Florida Keys

    February 8, 2017 | 2 minute read

    Four large crawlers – one, a female, was nearly 16 feet long – turned up within the last month at an old missile base at Crocodile Lake National Wildlife Refuge.  Learn more...

  • A large snake with a black and brown pattern on its back moving through the grass.
    Burmese python. Photo by Liz Barraco, FWC.

    Partnering across the Everglades to battle invasives

    April 13, 2016 | 4 minute read

    Florida is considered “Ground Zero” in America’s fight against the spread of non-native species with more non-native reptile and amphibian species than anywhere else in the world.  Learn more...

News

  • A tall rocky island emerging from a calm blue sea.
    Desecheo Island, Puerto Rico. Photo © Claudio Uribe, Island Conservation. Used with permission: S://EA/Photo Permissions/desecheo-island-conservation.pdf.

    Desecheo National Wildlife Refuge safe from invasive mammals after nearly 100 years

    June 27, 2017 | 6 minute read

    Lea en español. After more than a decade of conservation intervention, Desecheo National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) is once again safe for the threatened higo chumbo cactus, native seabirds, and unique lizards found nowhere else in the world. Just one year after an ambitious operation to rid Desecheo NWR of introduced rats, conservation biologists have confirmed that these damaging predators are absent from the island, and the operation was a success.  Read the full story...

Podcasts

  • A white fuzz developing along the stems of a pine tree.
    Hemlock woolly adelgid, an exotic insect pest. Photo by Nicholas A. Tonelli, CC BY 2.0.

    Hemlock woolly adelgid predator beatles released

    January 19, 2016 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. As part of the ongoing effort to combat the hemlock woolly adelgid in the Southern Appalachians, the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission recently released predator beetles into Buncombe County’s Sandy Mush Game Lands. The hemlock woolly adelgid is an Asian insect, accidently introduced to the United States, which attacks and kills our native hemlock trees. There are a couple of methods to counter the adeligd – the first is chemically treating individual trees.  Learn more...

  • A black, furry hog walks across a grass path.
    Wild hog. Photo by Tom Mortenson, FWC.

    Hogs in Tennessee

    October 5, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature Southern Appalachian Mountain bogs are one of the rarest habitats in the nation, and on my way to visit a North Georgia bog, our guides stopped to check a hog trap – designed to catch the hogs that were rooting in the bog, and damaging some of its rare plants. Feral hogs can cause tremendous damage to our natural areas, and now Tennessee is going to survey farmers and other rural landowners to get a state-wide estimate of economic damage from feral hogs.  Learn more...

  • A shiny green insect burrowed into a tree.
    Emerald ashe borer. Photo by USDA.

    Emerald ash borer control

    September 21, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. On a recent camping trip to Great Smoky Mountains National Park, it bore remembering that the park only allows outside firewood that is certified as being heated to the point that undesirable insects hitching a ride on the wood would be killed. One of the undesirable insects that is already in the park is the emerald ash borer. This Asian insect was first detected in the United States in Michigan in 2002 and has killed tens of millions of ash trees across the U.  Learn more...

  • A stack of aged firewood
    Firewood. Photo by Chris Warren, CC BY-NC 2.0.

    Great Smoky Mountains National Park and heat-treated firewood

    July 28, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Officials at Great Smoky Mountains National Park are proposing to help protect park forests by further limiting the type of firewood brought into the park. Non-native, tree-killing insects and diseases can be unknowingly introduced into the park through firewood transported from infested areas. The park proposes reducing this threat by changing park rules to allow only heat-treated wood to be brought into the park for campground fires.  Learn more...

  • A close-up photograph of a rust colored crayfish.
    Rusty crayfish. Photo by Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

    Rusty crayfish

    March 24, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Biologists with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission are asking anglers to help stop the spread of the rusty crayfish — a destructive, non-native crayfish that has invaded the upper Catawba River in western North Carolina. The rusty crayfish, which measures about 5 inches long, is native to the Ohio River watershed but can now be found in Canada and 17 other states, including North Carolina.  Learn more...

  • Curly white and yellow honeysuckle flowers growing off of a lush green plant.
    Japanese honeysuckle. Photo by Carol Foil, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    Japanese honeysuckle

    January 16, 2013 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Japanese honeysuckle – for many, those yellow and white blooms are as indicative of summer as fireflies, watermelon, and baseball. All of us probably have memories of plucking the flowers and pulling the pistil through the flower’s base to capture that drop of nectar. However, this plant wasn’t always emblematic of summer in the South. As its name implies, it’s not from around here.  Learn more...

  • Curly white and yellow honeysuckle flowers growing off of a lush green plant.
    Japanese honeysuckle. Photo by Carol Foil, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    An app to track invasive plants

    January 9, 2013 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. There was a joke going around recently about how we have the collective knowledge of humanity accessible through a device that fits in our pocket, which we mainly use to look at pictures of cats. It’s kind of amazing the frivolity that lies at the heart of most of our smart phone use. However, there are opportunities to use these tools to make this world a better place.  Learn more...

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