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Tag: Invasive Species

The content below has been tagged with the term “Invasive Species.”

Articles

  • Two outstretched hands hold a small turtle with yellow markings on its head and tail
    Information icon A search of a creek at the Rock Ranch in central Georgia turned up plants, tadpoles and at least one turtle. The ranch, 70 miles south of Atlanta, hosted more than 200 urban youth recently. They were guests of the Steve & Marjorie Harvey Foundation, which sponsors an annual mentoring program. Photo by Mark Davis, USFWS.

    City comes to the country

    June 25, 2019 | 7 minute read

    Thomaston, Georgia — Rule 1 in the art of angling: You have to master the worm. “Ewww!” The teen holding the fishing rod recoiled at the sight of a wad of wigglers. “No. Uh-uh!” — that, from a buddy peering over his shoulder. And a third reaction, courtesy of a fellow who stood 6-foot-2 or more: “I ain’t touching that!” Thus did the guys from the city get introduced to a bit of country.  Learn more...

  • Service uses weevils to control invasive salvinia that threatens Louisiana coast

    September 6, 2018 | 4 minute read

    Giant salvinia is an invasive floating fern from Brazil that can double its surface acreage in less than one week in optimal conditions. It has been spreading and causing problems in coastal Louisiana since 1989. Once it covers the water’s surface, this floating plant will begin to stack up upon itself, and can extend 12 inches or more above the water surface. Under such conditions, oxygen recharge of underlying waters is greatly reduced.  Learn more...

  • An airboat operator sits back and watches the marsh burn.
    Information icon Prescribed fire at Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge.

    Fire as tool, and as friend

    August 24, 2018 | 8 minute read

    Fire – prescribed and carefully managed – can be a wildlands’ best friend. Wildlife officials tout its ecological benefits. Hunters, fishermen and birders laud its cattail-clearing, nutrient-adding attributes. Hydrologists praise unimpeded water flows. Photo by USFWS.  Learn more...

  • A young hunter crouches while holding a rife in the woods.
    Information icon Codey Elrod, hog control technician with the Georgia Department of Natural Resources. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    Hunting the wild hog

    April 9, 2018 | 10 minute read

    Codey Elrod has a job most Southern hunters would kill for. Literally. My job,” Elrod said, “is to kill hogs.” And he gets paid for it.  Learn more...

  • Veterans carry their hog through a swamp.
    Information icon Two wounded warriors and a volunteer, accompanied by a cameraman, carry a feral pig through the swamp at Waccamaw National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by SOWW.

    Hog heaven

    March 28, 2018 | 3 minute read

    Feral pigs are widely considered a nuisance species. The wild hogs cause an estimated $1.5 billion in property damage every year all over the United States on both public and private lands, according to the Mississippi State University Center for Resolving Human-Wildlife Conflicts. They are an invasive species that can disrupt entire food chains. “They’re really bad for the ecosystem,” said Craig Sasser, refuge manager at Waccamaw National Wildlife Refuge in South Carolina.  Learn more...

  • A half dozen large silver fish jumping out of the water to a height of six feet.
    Information icon School of jumping silver carp. Photo by Ryan Hagerty, USFWS.

    A war in the water

    March 19, 2018 | 8 minute read

    Eastport, Mississippi — This stretch of the Tennessee River is considered the most aquatically biodiverse in the nation, teeming with sportfish and at-risk snails and mussels. Locals boast that Pickwick Lake, where Mississippi, Alabama and Tennessee come together, is “the smallmouth bass capital of the world.” Catfish and buffalo fill commercial angler’s nets. Marinas lining the reservoir’s roads attest to Pickwick’s huge economic impact. Yet the Tennessee River, and a way of life, is under siege.  Learn more...

  • A group of seven people crouching on a beach while holding a 16 foot python.
    Information icon Irula tribesmen from India have been helping state and federal officials in Florida capture invasive pythons. This 16-foot female turned up in a disused bunker at a closed missile site at Crocodile Lake National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Ed Metzger, University of Florida.

    Pythons nose their way into Florida Keys

    February 8, 2017 | 2 minute read

    Four large crawlers – one, a female, was nearly 16 feet long – turned up within the last month at an old missile base at Crocodile Lake National Wildlife Refuge.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A bright green irrodescent fish in a small blue net.
    Information icon Barrens topminnow. Photo by Emily Granstaff, USFWS.

    Proposed listing of the Barrens topminnow

    January 3, 2018 | 7 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? We are proposing to list the Barrens topminnow as an endangered species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). What does it mean when a species is listed as endangered? A species is listed in one of two categories: endangered or threatened. An endangered species is one that is in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range.  Learn more...

News

  • A bright green irrodescent fish in a small blue net.
    Information icon Barrens topminnow. Photo by Emily Granstaff, USFWS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes endangered status for Barrens topminnow

    January 3, 2018 | 4 minute read

    The Barrens Plateau is home to a beautiful, iridescent fish that rarely grows longer than four inches and is found in only a few creeks and springs in four Tennessee counties. That little fish is now in trouble, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to help protect it as an endangered species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The Barrens topminnow has suffered from introduction of the non-native western mosquitofish, which has invaded the minnow’s habitat, outcompeting it for food and directly preying on young topminnows.  Read the full story...

  • A tall rocky island emerging from a calm blue sea.
    Desecheo Island, Puerto Rico. Photo © Claudio Uribe, Island Conservation. Used with permission: S://EA/Photo Permissions/desecheo-island-conservation.pdf.

    Desecheo National Wildlife Refuge safe from invasive mammals after nearly 100 years

    June 27, 2017 | 6 minute read

    Lea en español. After more than a decade of conservation intervention, Desecheo National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) is once again safe for the threatened higo chumbo cactus, native seabirds, and unique lizards found nowhere else in the world. Just one year after an ambitious operation to rid Desecheo NWR of introduced rats, conservation biologists have confirmed that these damaging predators are absent from the island, and the operation was a success.  Read the full story...

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