skip to content

Tag: Invasive Species

The content below has been tagged with the term “Invasive Species.”

Articles

  • Carp jumping at Lake Barkley Dam.
    Information icon Carp jumping at Lake Barkley Dam. Photo Credit: Invasive Carp Regional Coordinating Committee.

    High Tech Battle Waged Against Invasive Carp

    October 20, 2021 | 9 minute read

    The fate of millions of invasive carp — and fisheries along the Mississippi, Ohio, Illinois, Missouri, Tennessee and Cumberland rivers – hinges on the high-tech tools housed inside two, nondescript metal containers atop the bullnose that separates Lake Barkley’s lock from its dam.  Learn more...

  • More than a dozen volunteers planting shrubs on a sandy beach
    Information icon On Volunteer Day at Crocodile Lake National Wildlife Refuge, volunteers planted native torchwood and wild lime on a site that had recently been full of debris that could have hidden invasive pythons. Photo by Jeremy Dixon, USFWS.

    Coastal Program project helps Florida Keys refuge withstand possible python invasion

    July 10, 2020 | 3 minute read

    Invasive species surveillance and control is front and center for Crocodile Lake National Wildlife Refuge in the Florida Keys. Just a short 18 mile drive north is the Florida Everglades, where invasive pythons are wreaking havoc on the ecosystem, a situation that would have devastating effects on endangered Keys fauna if the species were to take hold. Indeed, several pythons (one measuring 16 feet long) have already been discovered in the refuge and removed.  Learn more...

  • A green mat-forming plant covers the open water in a marsh
    Information icon Giant salvinia covering a pond in fresh marshes near Forked Island, 6-May-2016. Photo by Ronny Paille, USFWS.

    Bio-control of giant salvinia in coastal Louisiana

    November 13, 2019 | 5 minute read

    Giant salvinia is an invasive floating fern from Brazil. The plant spreads vegetatively, from whole plants or plant fragments. Giant salvinia can double its surface acreage in less than one week. It has been spreading and causing problems in coastal Louisiana since 1989. Giant salvinia tends to accumulate in small ponds or areas lacking water exchange. Once it covers the water’s surface, this floating plant will begin to stack up upon itself, and can extend 12 inches or more above the water surface.  Learn more...

  • Two outstretched hands hold a small turtle with yellow markings on its head and tail
    Information icon A search of a creek at the Rock Ranch in central Georgia turned up plants, tadpoles and at least one turtle. The ranch, 70 miles south of Atlanta, hosted more than 200 urban youth recently. They were guests of the Steve & Marjorie Harvey Foundation, which sponsors an annual mentoring program. Photo by Mark Davis, USFWS.

    City comes to the country

    June 25, 2019 | 7 minute read

    Thomaston, Georgia — Rule 1 in the art of angling: You have to master the worm. “Ewww!” The teen holding the fishing rod recoiled at the sight of a wad of wigglers. “No. Uh-uh!” — that, from a buddy peering over his shoulder. And a third reaction, courtesy of a fellow who stood 6-foot-2 or more: “I ain’t touching that!” Thus did the guys from the city get introduced to a bit of country.  Learn more...

  • Service uses weevils to control invasive salvinia that threatens Louisiana coast

    September 6, 2018 | 4 minute read

    Giant salvinia is an invasive floating fern from Brazil that can double its surface acreage in less than one week in optimal conditions. It has been spreading and causing problems in coastal Louisiana since 1989. Once it covers the water’s surface, this floating plant will begin to stack up upon itself, and can extend 12 inches or more above the water surface. Under such conditions, oxygen recharge of underlying waters is greatly reduced.  Learn more...

  • An airboat operator sits back and watches the marsh burn.
    Information icon Prescribed fire at Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge.

    Fire as tool, and as friend

    August 24, 2018 | 8 minute read

    Fire – prescribed and carefully managed – can be a wildlands’ best friend. Wildlife officials tout its ecological benefits. Hunters, fishermen and birders laud its cattail-clearing, nutrient-adding attributes. Hydrologists praise unimpeded water flows. Photo by USFWS.  Learn more...

  • A young hunter crouches while holding a rife in the woods.
    Information icon Codey Elrod, hog control technician with the Georgia Department of Natural Resources. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    Hunting the wild hog

    April 9, 2018 | 10 minute read

    Codey Elrod has a job most Southern hunters would kill for. Literally. My job,” Elrod said, “is to kill hogs.” And he gets paid for it.  Learn more...

  • Veterans carry their hog through a swamp.
    Information icon Two wounded warriors and a volunteer, accompanied by a cameraman, carry a feral pig through the swamp at Waccamaw National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by SOWW.

    Hog heaven

    March 28, 2018 | 3 minute read

    Feral pigs are widely considered a nuisance species. The wild hogs cause an estimated $1.5 billion in property damage every year all over the United States on both public and private lands, according to the Mississippi State University Center for Resolving Human-Wildlife Conflicts. They are an invasive species that can disrupt entire food chains. “They’re really bad for the ecosystem,” said Craig Sasser, refuge manager at Waccamaw National Wildlife Refuge in South Carolina.  Learn more...

  • A half dozen large silver fish jumping out of the water to a height of six feet.
    Information icon School of jumping silver carp. Photo by Ryan Hagerty, USFWS.

    A war in the water

    March 19, 2018 | 8 minute read

    Eastport, Mississippi — This stretch of the Tennessee River is considered the most aquatically biodiverse in the nation, teeming with sportfish and at-risk snails and mussels. Locals boast that Pickwick Lake, where Mississippi, Alabama and Tennessee come together, is “the smallmouth bass capital of the world.” Catfish and buffalo fill commercial angler’s nets. Marinas lining the reservoir’s roads attest to Pickwick’s huge economic impact. Yet the Tennessee River, and a way of life, is under siege.  Learn more...

News

  • Park staff releasing a snake in a swamp in an effort to find more invasive species
    Information icon Secretary David Bernhardt in Big Cypress NP in Florida releasing a male python with tracker to lead to other invasive pythons. Public domain photo.

    USGS and partners tracking and removing Burmese pythons in Southern Florida

    July 10, 2020 | 6 minute read

    Washington – Today, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), U.S. National Park Service (NPS), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and Conservancy of Southwest Florida announced they have teamed up to radio-track Burmese pythons in Big Cypress National Preserve, Crocodile Lake National Wildlife Refuge and other areas of Southwest Florida. This new effort marks the first-time pythons are being tracked in so many different habitats to better understand python biology across the region and ultimately find ways to more effectively control this invasive species.  Read the full story...

Contact Us:

Looking for a media contact? Reach out to a regional spokesperson.

Share this page

Tweet this page on Twitter or follow @USFWSsoutheast

Share this page on Facebook or follow USFWSsoutheast.

LinkedIn

Share this page on LinkedIn