skip to content

Tag: Hurricane Michael

The content below has been tagged with the term “Hurricane Michael.”

Articles

  • A lake on St. Vincent NWR with emergent marsh and palm trees.
    Information icon A freshwater lake on St. Vincent NWR. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    An exotic hunt on a Florida island

    October 7, 2019 | 8 minute read

    Apalachicola, Florida — In 1907, a New York doctor, patent-medicine salesman and one-term congressman bought St. Vincent Island for $12,500 and set about turning the palmetto and pine-fringed preserve into a “wildlife emporium.” Dr. Raymond Pierce built trails, cottages, barns, dams and sluice gates to create duck ponds. He grew vegetables and raised cattle. And he also imported a menagerie of exotic Asian antlered beasts including sambar deer from India, a prized trophy for big-game hunters.  Learn more...

  • A pine forest with trees snapped in half by high winds and a bent speed limit sign
    Information icon Tyndall Air Force Base pine forests were scissored by Hurricane Michael. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    Opportunity from disaster

    June 7, 2019 | 7 minute read

    Panama City, Florida — Hurricane Michael savaged Tyndall Air Force Base with 160 mph winds that nearly destroyed the base and everything, including the trees, within its deadly path across the Panhandle. Damage to Tyndall alone topped $3 billion. Three-fourths of the pines on the 29,000-acre base between the Gulf of Mexico and East Bay were sheared in half. Tyndall lost $14 million in harvestable timber. Blackhawk helicopters fly over Tyndall Air Force Base.  Learn more...

  • A bright pink bird with large wings with black feathers flying across a blue sky
    Information icon Pinky The Flamingo turned up at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge in Florida after Hurricane Michael. Photo © Karen Willes, Friends of St. Marks Wildlife Refuge.

    Pinky in paradise

    May 2, 2019 | 4 minute read

    St. Marks, Florida — Hurricane Michael careened through the Gulf of Mexico last fall sucking up all manner of flotsam and jetsam before scattering the unwelcome mess across the Panhandle. Yet there was one airborne interloper that was embraced heartily by the storm-tossed masses below. Pinky The Flamingo.  Learn more...

  • A sign explains the hirstorical significance of the Florida torreya with a white house in the background.
    Information icon The Gregory House with propped-up torreya. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    Saving the Florida torreya

    April 22, 2019 | 8 minute read

    Bristol, Florida — The Florida torreya was one of the world’s most endangered trees even before Hurricane Michael savaged the remaining wild specimens along the Apalachicola River with 100-plus mph winds in October 2018. It was also one of the most controversial trees, Exhibit A in a roiling debate over how, and where, to keep alive species facing extinction. More than 650,000 torreyas once lined the ridgelines or hugged the ravines near the Apalachicola and Flint rivers.  Learn more...

  • A pine forest with trees snapped in half by high winds and a bent speed limit sign
    Information icon Tyndall Air Force Base pine forests were scissored by Hurricane Michael. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    After Hurricane Michael

    November 29, 2018 | 6 minute read

    Camilla, Georgia — Hurricane Michael barreled across prime Southern timber territory, damaging five million acres of pines and hardwoods and destroying nearly $1.7 billion worth of marketable trees. Habitat for many of the region’s at-risk species — red-cockaded woodpeckers, gopher tortoises, eastern indigo snakes — was sundered. Red-cockaded woodpecker in flight. Photo by Martjan Lammertink, U.S. Forest Service. Now, six weeks after Michael killed more than 45 people in Florida, Georgia, North Carolina and Virginia, forest owners salvage timber, clear stands and pray for a market rebound.  Learn more...

  • Biologist assess damage to a forest after a hurricane
    Information icon Joshua Havird (blue shirt) and Joel Casto (plaid shirt) assess RCW clusters. Photo by Michael Keys, USFS.

    Test flight for red-cockaded woodpeckers

    November 21, 2018 | 3 minute read

    Joshua Havird lifted his quadcopter drone from its case as if he was handling a carton of eggs. The assistant fire management officer from St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge was on hand at the neighboring Apalachicola National Forest in the wake of Hurricane Michael. The Apalachicola, the only national forest on Florida’s panhandle and about 20 miles to the east of Mexico Beach, was hit hard on its western flank.  Learn more...

  • A white sign that reads "Monarch Butterfly Festival, October 27th, St. Marks NWR, 850-925-6121"
    Information icon The festival takes place Oct. 27 at the refuge, located on Apalachee Bay on the Florida Panhandle. Photo by Mark Davis, USFWS.

    It’s monarch time

    October 24, 2018 | 5 minute read

    St. Marks, Florida — And now for a small bit of good news in a part of the country where a hurricane has made nearly every tale bad: The Monarch Butterfly Festival will take place as planned. Walk, drive and — yes — fly to the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge to celebrate that colorful flutterer, Danaus plexippus. The festival is Oct. 27 at a refuge where Hurricane Michael came calling earlier this month.  Learn more...

  • A brown sign bent in half by high winds that reads St Vincent NWR
    Information icon The sand-clogged dock with St. Vincent NWR in the background. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    Survivors of the storm

    October 22, 2018 | 6 minute read

    Bradley Smith seeks evidence that the red wolves survived Hurricane Michael off St. Vincent NWR. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS. Apalachicola, Florida — Bradley Smith stood tall on the bow of the SeaArk 21-footer with a VHF antenna held high. It was quiet, too quiet. It had been six days since Hurricane Michael devastated the Panhandle and Smith was listening for signs of life on St.  Learn more...

  • A street sign that reads “Shade St” on a street denuded of all vegetation
    Information icon A street whose name no longer applies now that it’s nearly treeless. Service crews worked Thursday to remove fallen oaks from the yards of people on Shade Street in Panama City. Photo by Mark Davis, USFWS.

    “The first people we’ve seen here since the hurricane”

    October 19, 2018 | 8 minute read

    Panama City, Florida — They didn’t have much time. Rose and Perry Lane fled just hours before Hurricane Michael bowled into Panama City. They took Mary Lane, 92, Perry’s mother. Simbo the cat sat in a carrier on her lap. The Lanes headed inland to an emergency shelter at a school where safety waited. Or so they thought. The fast-moving hurricane, trimming Panhandle pine forests like an immense lawn mower, got to the school not far behind the Lanes.  Learn more...

  • A drum-shapped buoy washed ashore with plam trees and a lighthouse in the distance
    Information icon A buoy washed ashore by Hurricane Michael at St. Marks NWR.

    Service makes headway in Hurricane Michael repairs

    October 17, 2018 | 5 minute read

    St. Marks, Florida — The images of Hurricane Michael’s rampage across the Panhandle have been seared, by now, into the nation’s collective consciousness: the roofless homes; the mountains of debris; the long lines of anguished people; and the miles of chopped-in-half trees. The worst of the damage came courtesy of winds nearing 155 mph. Michael’s counter-clockwise punch, though, pushed water from the Gulf of Mexico deep inland, swamping small towns, barrier islands and wildlife refuges, particularly along Michael’s eastern edge.  Learn more...

Contact Us:

Looking for a media contact? Reach out to a regional spokesperson.

Share this page

Tweet this page on Twitter or follow @USFWSsoutheast

Share this page on Facebook or follow USFWSsoutheast.

LinkedIn

Share this page on LinkedIn