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Tag: Hurricane Irma

The content below has been tagged with the term “Hurricane Irma.”

Articles

  • Six veterans pose for a photo in front of several pieces of heavy machinery
    Information icon The six-person Team and equipment they’re now trained on, with thanks to FWS instructor Aaron Eaton, far right. Photo by Jessica Sutt, FWS.

    Veterans training and hurricane restoration combine at Florida wildlife refuge

    November 5, 2019 | 2 minute read

    Team Rubicon is a veterans service organization that uses disaster response to help reintegrate veterans back into civilian life. Veteran-founded, this international service organization employs leadership and organizational skills to assist communities with disaster response and recovery. At Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge, Project Leader Kevin Godsea recognized a partnership opportunity when David Venables of Team Rubicon called him to ask if he could partner with the refuge for field training.  Learn more...

  • A volunteer removes weeds from a pollinator garden
    Information icon Two volunteers distribute mulch made from invasive Melaleuca trees across the expanded pollinator garden space. Photo by Jessica Sutt, USFWS.

    Friends, plants, and pollinators grow at Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge garden

    October 4, 2018 | 2 minute read

    Inspired by the Service’s pollinator protection initiatives and a butterfly inventory in 2015, members of the Friends of the Florida Panther Refuge formed a committee to begin work on establishing a pollinator garden at Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge. With a new headquarters administrative office site and acres of yard space surrounded by natural habitat, the Friends recognized an opportunity to simultaneously beautify the space, engage volunteers, educate guests, and add beneficial native plants for local pollinators.  Learn more...

  • A hillside with debris and trees snapped in half like twigs.
    Information icon A portion of Jose Roig’s coffee plantation immediately after Hurricane Maria struck. Photo by USFWS.

    Aid in the shade

    August 9, 2018 | 4 minute read

    In September 2017, Puerto Rico was already reeling from Hurricane Irma, which had doused it with torrential rains and caused widespread damage. Then, two weeks later, Hurricane Maria roared through, killing hundreds of residents, wiping out buildings, entire landscapes of vegetation, and practically the entire electrical grid. It was the worst natural disaster on record for the U.S. commonwealth island, which is still recovering from the Category 4 storm.  Learn more...

  • A building built on steel footings ready for hurricane force winds.
    Information icon The rebuilt Grand Bay National Wildlife Refuge visitor's center built to withstand future storms.

    Service facilities built to withstand nature’s worst

    November 9, 2017 | 5 minute read

    Hurricanes are never welcome, but they can prompt changes in buildings to make them better, stronger, and more capable of handling high water and even higher winds.  Learn more...

  • A team of USFWS employees gather in a circle for directions from Incident Commander Sami Gray.
    Information icon Incident commander Sami Gray holds a morning briefing. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    A tough woman gets the job done

    October 16, 2017 | 10 minute read

    Big Pine Key, Florida – It was hot already at 8 a.m. with temperatures expected to soar under a cloudless, tropical sky. The men and few women gathered at the Nut Farm, a former coconut tree plantation tucked amid downed trees and storm-wracked buildings, were receiving their daily marching orders. It had been a week since Irma and her 180 mph winds came ashore a couple of Keys over, and the U.  Learn more...

News

  • Resiliency and recovery: Florida Keys National Wildlife Refuges overcomes Irma to offer Outdoor Fest

    February 15, 2018 | 3 minute read

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Florida Keys National Wildlife Refuges Complex and their Friends group Florida Keys Wildlife Society invites everyone to celebrate this great comeback on Saturday, March 10th through Saturday, March 17th, with the third annual Outdoor Fest, featuring a week of family-friendly, mostly free outdoor adventures and hands-on activities.  Read the full story...

  • Two small deer walking across a street.
    Pair of Key deer. Photo by Bree McGhee, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    Florida Keys national wildlife refuges visitor center re-opens with modified hours due to Hurricane Irma

    November 29, 2017 | 2 minute read

    The Florida Keys National Wildlife Refuges Complex Visitor Center located at 179 Key Deer Blvd. in the Big Pine Key shopping plaza has now re-opened with modified hours and days on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Saturdays from 10 am- 3 pm. This Visitor Center serves the National Key Deer Refuge, Crocodile Lake NWR, Great White Heron NWR and Key West NWR. Residents and visitors are welcome to come on in, say hello and take advantages of the opportunities offered.  Read the full story...

  • A hand painted sign on plywood welcoming residents back to the Keys
    Welcoming residents home to the Keys. Photo by USFWS.

    Florida Keys National Wildlife Refuges Complex phased re-opening

    October 30, 2017 | 3 minute read

    On September 5, 2017, The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service closed all facilities and trails and cancelled all planned programs in the Crocodile Lake National Wildlife Refuge on Key Largo, the National Key Deer Refuge on Big Pine Key and the Key West and Great White Heron National Wildlife Refuges in the lower Keys as a result of Hurricane Irma. Like our neighbors, the Refuges and Refuge infrastructure sustained the whole spectrum of hurricane damage ranging from cosmetic to total destruction.  Read the full story...

  • A deer similar in appearance to a white-tailed deer, but much smaller in size
    A Key deer on Big Pine Key in Florida. Photo by Garry Tucker, USFWS.

    New survey shows Hurricane Irma had little impact on Key deer population

    October 23, 2017 | 3 minute read

    A new U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service survey has found that Hurricane Irma killed some of Florida’s endangered Key deer, but that the overall population remains healthy. Prior to Irma, the Service estimated approximately 1,100 deer roamed their core habitats on Big Pine Key and No Name Key. After Irma, Service staff estimated the population at 949 Key deer in the same areas. “We are happy to report Key deer numbers are well within the range we observed before Irma,” said National Key Deer Refuge manager Daniel Clark.  Read the full story...

  • A small deer with velvet covered antlers in a recently burned forest.
    Information icon A Key deer in velvet. Photo by USFWS.

    First, do no harm: keeping wildlife wild and healthy

    October 10, 2017 | 3 minute read

    Vero Beach, Florida – The old doctors’ adage “First, do no harm” also applies to wildlife, in this case Key deer. Legitimately trying to help in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma, well-meaning people have been providing a variety of food products (corn, dog/cat food, etc.) for Key deer and other wildlife. But feeding them could do more harm than good. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) strongly urges the public not to feed wildlife, particularly Key deer.  Read the full story...

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