skip to content

Tag: Hurricane Hugo

The content below has been tagged with the term “Hurricane Hugo.”

Articles

  • Radar image showing the eye of Hurricane Hugo impacting the South Carolina coast
    Information icon Hurricane Hugo satellite imagery, September 22nd, 1989. Radar map by NOAA/National Hurricane Center.

    Hurricane Hugo and the woodpeckers: the silver lining of a monster storm

    September 16, 2019 | 13 minute read

    As sad as it is to admit, September has almost become a month of dread for residents of the southeastern United States and the Caribbean. On guard 24⁄7, headlines from NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center with proclamations like “NOAA increases chance for above-normal hurricane season” create that all too familiar angst as residents sponge up every advisory issued by the National Hurricane Center. Woven together with data from satellites and sensors, citizens are fed an endless array of spaghetti models that are updated frequently, making real-time tracking possible for our ever-connected society.  Learn more...

  • A small bird in hand with white patches on its wing and a red patch behind its eye
    Information icon A male red-cockaded woodpecker showing off the red feathers behind its head called a cockade. Photo © Robert B. Clontz, The Nature Conservancy.

    Joining forces

    August 27, 2019 | 7 minute read

    Fort Stewart, Georgia — As military partnerships go, this has to be one of the oddest, and strongest. The fighting men and women of the 3rd Infantry Division train alongside… red-cockaded woodpeckers. Ft. Stewart just west of Savannah and north of Hinesville, GA. Map by Roy Hewitt, USFWS. Soldiers maneuver the eastern edge of the army base under a canopy of longleaf pine where the iconic woodpeckers make their home.  Learn more...

  • A pine forest with trees snapped in half by high winds and a bent speed limit sign
    Information icon Tyndall Air Force Base pine forests were scissored by Hurricane Michael. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    After Hurricane Michael

    November 29, 2018 | 6 minute read

    Camilla, Georgia — Hurricane Michael barreled across prime Southern timber territory, damaging five million acres of pines and hardwoods and destroying nearly $1.7 billion worth of marketable trees. Habitat for many of the region’s at-risk species — red-cockaded woodpeckers, gopher tortoises, eastern indigo snakes — was sundered. Red-cockaded woodpecker in flight. Photo by Martjan Lammertink, U.S. Forest Service. Now, six weeks after Michael killed more than 45 people in Florida, Georgia, North Carolina and Virginia, forest owners salvage timber, clear stands and pray for a market rebound.  Learn more...

  • A small green plant growing in a sand dune with bright red/pink stems.
    Seabeach amaranth at Onslow Beach, Camp Lejeune, NC. Photo by Lilibeth Serrano, USFWS.

    From Massachusetts to South Carolina, recovering seabeach amaranth

    December 7, 2017 | 6 minute read

    This is a story about people, places and a plant — but it’s more than just that. This is a story about faith in a tiny little seed and the huge potential for recovering a threatened species. First things first — the plant Most people have probably never heard of seabeach amaranth, but for such an obscure little dune plant, it bears a mighty burden. This low-growing annual colonizes newly disturbed habitats such as over-wash areas at the end of barrier islands and flat, low-lying areas along the foremost dunes.  Learn more...

Contact Us:

Looking for a media contact? Reach out to a regional spokesperson.

Share this page

Tweet this page on Twitter or follow @USFWSsoutheast

Share this page on Facebook or follow USFWSsoutheast.

LinkedIn

Share this page on LinkedIn