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Tag: Hunting

The content below has been tagged with the term “Hunting.”

Charleston

  • A kayaker navigates her boat through a flooded forest.
    Information icon Kayaking through Sparkleberry Swamp. Photo by USFWS.

    Outdoor recreation

    Our nation has one of the world’s largest networks of protected public lands set aside for the enjoyment of the American people. This vast network supports a healthy outdoor recreation industry, providing millions of jobs across the U.S. and generating billions of dollars for the economy. These jobs and revenue in turn help support local communities and fund conservation efforts. So whether you are hunting, fishing, or hiking, you’re not just renewing your spirit and improving your health, you’re also contributing to the future of conserving and enhancing our natural heritage for future generations.  Learn more...

Infographic

  • Southeast snapshot

    This infographic provides an overview of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Southeast Region (Region 4), which serves Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Region 4 includes most of the Gulf of Mexico and includes 131 National Wildlife Refuges, the majority of which are open to the public for hunting and fishing. It also includes 13 Environmental Services Offices and 13 National Fisheries.  Learn more...

News

  • Flooded bottomland hardwoods swamp.
    Swamp in fall. Photo by Eric S. Johnson, USFWS.

    New for 2016-17, all permit sales will be conducted online

    April 25, 2016 | 1 minute read

    In order to improve customer service to hunters, streamline operations, and reduce administrative costs associated with refuge hunt programs, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announces the start of online hunt permit sales for quota deer hunting on Bald Knob, Cache River, Holla Bend and Wapanocca National Wildlife Refuges. We will no longer accept money orders, applications or permit requests through the mail. An active link will be provided on our refuge website by June 1st.  Read the full story...

  • Thousands of ducks taking flight out of a marsh nearly cover the sky.
    Information icon Ducks at Upper Ouachita. Photo by Joseph McGowan, USFWS.

    Liberal season proposed for upcoming late waterfowl season

    July 31, 2009 | 6 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today proposed continuation of liberal hunting season lengths for the upcoming 2009-2010 late waterfowl seasons. Duck hunting season lengths would be 60 days in both the Atlantic and Mississippi Flyways, 74 days in the Central Flyway, and 107 days in the Pacific Flyway. Highlights of the proposed frameworks include: a full season on pintails with a one bird daily bag limit in the Atlantic, Mississippi and Central Flyways, and a two bird daily bag limit in the Pacific Flyway and a full season on canvasbacks with a one bird daily bag limit offered nation-wide.  Read the full story...

Podcasts

  • Four young turkeys walking down a gravel path.
    Wild turkeys. Photo by Tim Lenz, CC BY 2.0.

    Turkey hunting seminars

    March 9, 2016 | 2 minute read

    Transcript The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission and the National Wild Turkey Federation are offering free turkey hunting seminars in Henderson County’s Mills River community on April 1st and 2nd in anticipation of the upcoming spring turkey season. The April 1st seminar will be an introduction to turkey hunting, designed for novice hunters or those who have never hunted turkey and would like to learn more. Topics will include biology, hunting methods, calls and decoys, firearms and ammo selection, camouflage clothing, and turkey cleaning and cooking techniques.  Learn more...

  • Four young turkeys walking down a gravel path.
    Wild turkeys. Photo by Tim Lenz, CC BY 2.0.

    Turkey hunting seminars

    February 8, 2016 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission and the National Wild Turkey Federation are offering free turkey hunting seminars across North Carolina in March and April in anticipation of the spring turkey season. Introductory and advanced seminars are available on a first-come, first-serve basis to all ages, although participants 16 years and younger will need parental permission to register. Introductory seminars are designed for novice turkey hunters or those who have never hunted turkey.  Learn more...

  • A brown bird with purple wing tips floats on semi-frozen water.
    Information icon Female wood duck at Eufaula National Wildlife Refuge. Photo © Quincey Banks.

    Setting duck seasons

    December 7, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. In the United States, the vast majority of wildlife management is done by state wildlife agencies – the same folks who issue your hunting and fishing licenses. But there are some areas where the federal government steps in and takes a larger role. Ducks fly up and down North America each year, and they are avidly hunted. What if hunters in Virginia shot all the ducks before they could get to North Carolina?  Learn more...

  • An older man points to the sky with a child.
    Hunting. Photo by USFWS.

    Hunting, fishing, and outdoor recreation study

    April 11, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Last year saw the completion of the census. Done very ten years as directed by the Constitution, it begins to provide a wonderful picture of who we are as a nation and how we’ve changed. However, every five years is another nation-wide survey that begins to provide us with a picture of who we are as outdoorsmen and women.  Learn more...

Wildlife-and-You

  • A man and a woman dressed in bright orange safety gear walk across a saltmarsh during a deer hunt
    Information icon Hunting in a Florida saltmarsh. Photo by FWC.

    Hunting and fishing

    Hunting and fishing are Southern ways of life as much a part of the region’s heritage as Coca-Cola, college football and boiled peanuts. Yet the number of hunters and fishers continues to dwindle, though not as rapidly as in other parts of the country. Fewer outdoors men and women translates into fewer dollars spent on conservation overall because license fees and taxes are used to buy land, improve habitats and boost efforts to protect threatened and endangered species.  Learn more...

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