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Tag: Hunting

The content below has been tagged with the term “Hunting.”

Articles

  • Guy pointing, Richard Crossett points to a skein of snow geese crossing high above the Howell Tract.
    Information icon Richard Crossett points to a skein of snow geese crossing high above the Howell Tract. Photo credit Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    With disc and torch, restoring grassland, history

    April 27, 2021 | 8 minute read

    Augusta, Arkansas - The old rice plantation isn’t much to look at to the untrained eye. It’s dinner-table flat with waist-high grasses and clumps of saltbush. A few young oaks sit, forlornly, in the middle of the 200-acre field. The bottomland forest lining the Cache River is a mile away. To Richard Crossett, though, the so-called Howell Tract is beautiful. Crossett, you see, sees things differently. He’s a wildlife biologist with the U.  Learn more...

  • Man in camoflage shirt poses behind immobile deer.
    Information icon Photo of Adam Johnson with his first deer taken during Field to Fork. Photo courtesy of QDMA.

    Newcomers to ancient practice

    December 14, 2020 | 9 minute read

    Hunting has been a part of human life for thousands of years and was a necessity for early human survival. There were no grocery stores where meat could be purchased. Humans were completely self-sufficient. This tradition of self-sufficiency was part of the driving force that inspired Adam Johnson to begin exploring the sport of hunting. Johnson, 39, went hunting a few times on his own, but said those outings were little more than stumbling around, figuratively as well as literally, in the woods.  Learn more...

  • Salamander pokes head out of burrow in ground
    Information icon Red Hills salamander. Photo by USFWS

    Fish and Wildlife Service helps Alabama acquire wonderful habitat for rare salamander

    December 10, 2020 | 3 minute read

    Monroeville, Alabama – The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources celebrated Thursday the acquisition of nearly 5,000 acres for the federally threatened Red Hills salamander. The purple, translucent, lungless sallie isn’t the only creature to benefit from the newly conserved habitat. People who like to hunt, fish, hike, bike and bird watch, too, will be able to recreate on the south Alabama land.  Learn more...

  • Not even Swamp Ape legend deters hunters from flocking to Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge

    October 28, 2020 | 5 minute read

    Chiefland, Florida – If ever there was a time to get out and into the woods and hunt, this pandemic-riven season is surely it. But beware the Swamp Ape. The what? Swamp Ape. Skunk Ape. Moth Man. Whatever you call it, some Big Bend hunters swear they’ve seen a large half-man, half-beast creature prowling the Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge. Andrew Gude, refuge manager, felt compelled to address the reports - or myths - in the 2020-21 hunt brochure:  Learn more...

  • New projects in the sights

    October 6, 2020 | 3 minute read

    Funding program enhances improvement, creation of shooting ranges  Learn more...

  • Gator hunting

    August 18, 2020 | 7 minute read

    Savannah, Georgia — The Savannah River was running high after a wet spring, but they were out there somewhere, up the tidal creeks or in watery holes dug to avoid the day’s heat. Alligators. “They’re hidden pretty good,” said Greg Blanks, the senior wildlife officer for the Savannah National Wildlife Refuge, as he maneuvered a jon boat alongside Abercorn Island. “But you’ll see them at night when their eyes give them away.  Learn more...

National-Wildlife-Refuges

  • A boy wearing a camouflage hat holds a shotgun ready to hunt waterfowl
    A boy waterfowl hunting. Photo by Tina Shaw, USFWS.

    Hunting on Southeastern Refuges

    Hunting is part of our American heritage and is a huge economic contributor to the conservation of our nation’s wildlife and habitats. We offer seasonal hunting opportunities on a variety of southeastern national wildlife refuges. You can hunt a range of species including white-tailed deer, waterfowl, turkey and even help control wild hogs.  Learn more...

News

  • Purple and transluscent salamander on a forest floor
    Information icon Red Hills salamander. Photo by Emmett Blankenship, USFWS

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources conserve salamander habitat

    December 10, 2020 | 3 minute read

    MONROEVILLE, ALABAMA – The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources celebrated Thursday the acquisition of nearly 5,000 acres for the federally threatened Red Hills salamander. In all, 11,000 acres of prime salamander habitat in south Alabama will be protected and opened for recreation, including hunting. The Service awarded $9 million in endangered species recovery grants – the largest ever distributed in the Southeast – to Alabama for conservation at the Forever Wild Red Hills Complex.  Read the full story...

  • Secretary Bernhardt announces historic expansion of hunting and fishing opportunities on public lands

    August 18, 2020 | 17 minute read

    Saginaw, Michigan – Continuing the Trump Administration’s unprecedented efforts to increase recreational access on public lands, U.S. Secretary of the Interior David L. Bernhardt announced today at the Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge the historic opening and expansion of over 850 hunting and fishing opportunities across more than 2.3 million acres at 147 national wildlife refuges and national fish hatcheries. This rule is the single largest expansion of hunting and fishing opportunities by the U.  Read the full story...

Waterfowl

  • A hunter and his brown dog on its hind legs look out of the opening of a duck blind
    Information icon Two sportsmen enjoying a morning waterfowl hunt. Photo by Stacey Hayden, USFWS.

    Public access

    Hunting Waterfowl hunters are required to follow state and federal regulations when hunting on national wildlife refuges, including purchasing and carrying a Federal Duck Stamp. Duck Stamps are one of the most successful conservation tools ever created to protect habitat for migratory birds and help ensure abundant waterfowl populations in the future. Approximately 98% of the revenue generated by Duck Stamps goes directly to help acquire and protect wetlands. These wetlands in turn help purify water, aid in flood control, reduce soil erosion, and provide lots of other recreation opportunities.  Learn more...

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