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Tag: Hunting

The content below has been tagged with the term “Hunting.”

Articles

  • A FWS biologist on the shoreline of a river
    Information icon Dave Helon, forest ecologist at Grand Bay National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    Hunt Alabama. And Mississippi. And the rest of the country.

    March 19, 2020 | 8 minute read

    Grand Bay, Alabama — Head west on U.S. 90 from this old Gulf Coast farming town, turn left onto Pecan Road and then follow Bayou Heron Road through the Grand Bay National Wildlife Refuge to one of Alabama’s best spots to go duck hunting. In Mississippi. Because you can’t easily reach one of the finest redhead-hunting sites in Alabama without first crossing the border into the Magnolia State. But that doesn’t keep dozens of Alabama duck hunters from hauling their Jon boats to the 10,200-acre, bi-state refuge each morning before the sun crests Grand Bay.  Learn more...

  • An eight-point bucks head emerges from tall green grass
    Information icon White-tailed deer on Seedskadee National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Tom Koerner, USFWS.

    Locally sourced and served

    February 24, 2020 | 7 minute read

    It was a fine day to sit in a tree — cool, the December sun casting shadows across the leafy floor below. Mark Carter didn’t move. The minutes passed. They became an hour. Carter and the man who’d brought him into the woods traded an occasional murmur. The shadows grew longer. Night would soon come to Georgia. Then, just about 100 yards away: a flash of tan in the dwindling light — Odocoileus virginianus, a white-tail deer.  Learn more...

  • A calm river banked on both sides by tall trees.
    Information icon Groton Plantation fronts 24 miles of the Savannah River. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    What the world used to look like

    December 11, 2019 | 8 minute read

    Estill, South Carolina — The descendants of John Winthrop, founder of the Massachusetts Bay Colony nearly 400 years ago, recently set aside 14,000 acres along the Savannah River that will forever remain undeveloped. It is the largest private conservation easement in South Carolina history. Its significance, though, goes well beyond the creation of a natural bulwark against overdevelopment and forest loss. A bevy of private, commercial, nonprofit and government donors, including the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, cobbled together the $12.  Learn more...

  • A beautiful salt marsh with palm and oak trees in the distance partially obscuring a white lighthouse
    Information icon A marsh at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Orville Allen, CC BY 2.0.

    Want to hunt a refuge? Fish a hatchery?

    November 7, 2019 | 8 minute read

    St. Marks, Florida — The slash pine forest is thick and overgrown, impenetrable due to walls of saw palmetto, gallberry and fetterbush. A hunter this season would more likely get lost in there than bag a whitetail. Next season, though, will be different. Dan Frisk, project leader for the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, stands by a deer stand used for the youth hunt each December on the refuge.  Learn more...

  • A lake on St. Vincent NWR with emergent marsh and palm trees.
    Information icon A freshwater lake on St. Vincent NWR. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    An exotic hunt on a Florida island

    October 7, 2019 | 8 minute read

    Apalachicola, Florida — In 1907, a New York doctor, patent-medicine salesman and one-term congressman bought St. Vincent Island for $12,500 and set about turning the palmetto and pine-fringed preserve into a “wildlife emporium.” Dr. Raymond Pierce built trails, cottages, barns, dams and sluice gates to create duck ponds. He grew vegetables and raised cattle. And he also imported a menagerie of exotic Asian antlered beasts including sambar deer from India, a prized trophy for big-game hunters.  Learn more...

  • West Tennessee refuges host first Wounded Warrior deer hunt

    December 13, 2018 | 1 minute read

    Hatchie National Wildlife Refuge in Brownsville, Tennessee, hosted 10 warriors for the refuge’s first annual Wounded Warrior hunt on Saturday, November 17. On hand to greet them were Tennessee State Senator Dolores Gresham, Brownsville Mayor Bill Rawls, and Haywood County Mayor David Livingston. Community sponsors, Insouth Bank of Brownsville and Brownsville Exchange Club, provided a dinner on Friday night and lunch on Saturday. Refuge employees put up 10 blinds and tree stands and assisted the hunters.  Learn more...

National-Wildlife-Refuges

  • A boy wearing a camouflage hat holds a shotgun ready to hunt waterfowl
    A boy waterfowl hunting. Photo by Tina Shaw, USFWS.

    Hunting on Southeastern Refuges

    Hunting is part of our American heritage and is a huge economic contributor to the conservation of our nation’s wildlife and habitats. We offer seasonal hunting opportunities on a variety of southeastern national wildlife refuges. You can hunt a range of species including white-tailed deer, waterfowl, turkey and even help control wild hogs.  Learn more...

News

  • A forest composed of many small trees and a grassy/shrub understory
    Information icon A forested section of the proposed Green River National Wildlife Refuge and Conservation Partnership Area. Photo by Lee Andrews, USFWS.

    Public invited to comment on proposed new national wildlife refuge in Henderson County, Kentucky

    July 24, 2019 | 2 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is inviting the public to comment on the proposed establishment of Green River National Wildlife Refuge in Henderson County, Kentucky. Working at the direction of Congress and in close cooperation with the Commonwealth of Kentucky, the Service has worked to increase hunter access and conserve important wildlife habitat on approximately 24,000 acres in the proposed refuge. A draft land protection plan (LPP) and environmental assessment (EA) have been developed in cooperation with partners as part of the process.  Read the full story...

  • States receive more than $1 billion for recreation access, conservation

    April 1, 2019 | 2 minute read

    Outdoor recreationists who hunt, shoot, fish and boat are providing more than $1 billion this year to support increased outdoor access and wildlife habitat conservation across the United States. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is distributing the funds to all 50 states and U.S. territories today. The funds are generated through excise taxes on hunting, shooting and fishing equipment and boat fuel. Authorized by Congress through the Pittman-Robertson Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Act and Dingell-Johnson/Wallop-Breaux Federal Aid in Sport Fish Restoration Act, these dollars support critical state conservation and outdoor recreation projects.  Read the full story...

Waterfowl

  • A hunter and his brown dog on its hind legs look out of the opening of a duck blind
    Information icon Two sportsmen enjoying a morning waterfowl hunt. Photo by Stacey Hayden, USFWS.

    Public access

    Hunting Waterfowl hunters are required to follow state and federal regulations when hunting on national wildlife refuges, including purchasing and carrying a Federal Duck Stamp. Duck Stamps are one of the most successful conservation tools ever created to protect habitat for migratory birds and help ensure abundant waterfowl populations in the future. Approximately 98% of the revenue generated by Duck Stamps goes directly to help acquire and protect wetlands. These wetlands in turn help purify water, aid in flood control, reduce soil erosion, and provide lots of other recreation opportunities.  Learn more...

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