skip to content

Tag: Hunting

The content below has been tagged with the term “Hunting.”

Articles

  • A flock of geese flying over a pond full of white swans
    Information icon Wildlife management areas, such as North Carolina's Texas Plantation, have benefited from a decades-old federal funding plan. The state acquired the 1,467-acre tract with $1.38 million in federal restoration funds. It matched that amount with $462,500 from the sale of hunting and fishing licenses. Photo by NCWRC.

    Money well-spent

    July 8, 2020 | 6 minute read

    The evidence is there, in long rows of numbers and words that detail where the land was purchased, and when, and — most important — how much. But numbers and words don’t explain how a lake sparkles beneath a rising sun. They cannot convey the scent of pine needles, the rapid-fire hammering of a woodpecker. The sums cannot add to the thrill of seeing a mama bear and her cubs stick inquisitive noses into a forest clearing.  Learn more...

  • An aerial photograph of a river cutting through a marsh emptying into a the Gulf of Mexico.
    Information icon A View South over Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, Grand Bay, MS. Photo by USFWS.

    Gulf of Mexico Restoration Benefits Wetlands and Recreation

    June 24, 2020 | 5 minute read

    As we transition from American Wetlands Month through National Great Outdoors Month, it is the perfect time to showcase the restoration progress we continue to make in the Gulf of Mexico region. The Deepwater Horizon explosion occurred 10 years ago this spring and we’ve read many stories about the explosion and the sad impact the spill has had on wildlife and habitat. Oil fouled more than 1,300 miles of shoreline from Texas to Florida.  Learn more...

  • An aerial photograph of a meandering river cutting through a marsh
    Information icon Overhead view of Cabin Bluff and Ceylon properties. Photo © Mac Stone.

    History, both natural and human, lives in Georgia coastal preserve

    June 9, 2020 | 7 minute read

    Woodbine, Georgia — The state’s newest Wildlife Management Area sits a half mile off Interstate 95, yet a world removed from the hurly-burly of modern life. Pass the entrance on Ceylon Road, which runs through some of the Southeast’s most beautiful and pristine coastal lands, and step back in time. Stately stands of longleaf pine and live oak, some two centuries old, tower over savannah-like prairies and freshwater wetlands. More than 4,000 burrows, home to at-risk gopher tortoises, dot the landscape.  Learn more...

  • A greenish brown fish with dark brown spots along its side
    Information icon Brown trout. Photo by USFWS.

    Staying indoors leads to getting outdoors

    May 12, 2020 | 5 minute read

    Maybe you’re still sheltering in place, working from home, unable to go to the gym or church. What do you do? Go fishing. Millions of Americans are doing just that — in eye-popping numbers. Cooped up, and without their usual recreational outlets, anglers have taken mightily to the mountain streams, reservoir lakes and coastal waters across the South. The U.S. Department of the Interior’s decision two years ago to expand hunting and fishing opportunities at the nation’s wildlife refuges and fish hatcheries seems particularly fortuitous.  Learn more...

  • A FWS biologist on the shoreline of a river
    Information icon Dave Helon, forest ecologist at Grand Bay National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    Hunt Alabama. And Mississippi. And the rest of the country.

    March 19, 2020 | 8 minute read

    Grand Bay, Alabama — Head west on U.S. 90 from this old Gulf Coast farming town, turn left onto Pecan Road and then follow Bayou Heron Road through the Grand Bay National Wildlife Refuge to one of Alabama’s best spots to go duck hunting. In Mississippi. Because you can’t easily reach one of the finest redhead-hunting sites in Alabama without first crossing the border into the Magnolia State. But that doesn’t keep dozens of Alabama duck hunters from hauling their Jon boats to the 10,200-acre, bi-state refuge each morning before the sun crests Grand Bay.  Learn more...

  • An eight-point bucks head emerges from tall green grass
    Information icon White-tailed deer on Seedskadee National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Tom Koerner, USFWS.

    Locally sourced and served

    February 24, 2020 | 7 minute read

    It was a fine day to sit in a tree — cool, the December sun casting shadows across the leafy floor below. Mark Carter didn’t move. The minutes passed. They became an hour. Carter and the man who’d brought him into the woods traded an occasional murmur. The shadows grew longer. Night would soon come to Georgia. Then, just about 100 yards away: a flash of tan in the dwindling light — Odocoileus virginianus, a white-tail deer.  Learn more...

National-Wildlife-Refuges

  • A boy wearing a camouflage hat holds a shotgun ready to hunt waterfowl
    A boy waterfowl hunting. Photo by Tina Shaw, USFWS.

    Hunting on Southeastern Refuges

    Hunting is part of our American heritage and is a huge economic contributor to the conservation of our nation’s wildlife and habitats. We offer seasonal hunting opportunities on a variety of southeastern national wildlife refuges. You can hunt a range of species including white-tailed deer, waterfowl, turkey and even help control wild hogs.  Learn more...

News

  • An older man points to the sky with a child.
    Information icon Hunting. Photo by USFWS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes more opportunities to hunt, fish across South Atlantic, Gulf and Mississippi Basin

    April 27, 2020 | 5 minute read

    Atlanta, Georgia — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes to expand hunting and fishing opportunities on another 500,000 acres of national wildlife refuge lands across the South. If approved, the new regulations will take effect this fall. In all, 22 refuges will offer more than 110 new or expanded hunting and fishing opportunities — new species to hunt, more acres to hunt and more times to hunt. “We continue to build upon our recent successes to expand our recreational offerings,” said Leo Miranda, an avid hunter and regional director for the South Atlantic-Gulf & Mississippi Basin.  Read the full story...

  • Secretary Bernhardt proposes historic expansion of hunting and fishing opportunities

    April 8, 2020 | 7 minute read

    Washington, D.C. – Continuing the Trump Administration’s significant efforts to increase recreational access on public lands, U.S. Secretary of the Interior David L. Bernhardt announced today a historic proposal for new and expanded hunting and fishing opportunities across more than 2.3 million acres at 97 national wildlife refuges and 9 national fish hatcheries. This proposed rule is the single largest expansion of hunting and fishing opportunities by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) in history.  Read the full story...

Waterfowl

  • A hunter and his brown dog on its hind legs look out of the opening of a duck blind
    Information icon Two sportsmen enjoying a morning waterfowl hunt. Photo by Stacey Hayden, USFWS.

    Public access

    Hunting Waterfowl hunters are required to follow state and federal regulations when hunting on national wildlife refuges, including purchasing and carrying a Federal Duck Stamp. Duck Stamps are one of the most successful conservation tools ever created to protect habitat for migratory birds and help ensure abundant waterfowl populations in the future. Approximately 98% of the revenue generated by Duck Stamps goes directly to help acquire and protect wetlands. These wetlands in turn help purify water, aid in flood control, reduce soil erosion, and provide lots of other recreation opportunities.  Learn more...

Contact Us:

Looking for a media contact? Reach out to a regional spokesperson.

Share this page

Tweet this page on Twitter or follow @USFWSsoutheast

Share this page on Facebook or follow USFWSsoutheast.

LinkedIn

Share this page on LinkedIn