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Tag: Hemlock Woolly Adelgid

The content below has been tagged with the term “Hemlock Woolly Adelgid.”

Podcasts

  • A white fuzz developing along the stems of a pine tree.
    Hemlock woolly adelgid, an exotic insect pest. Photo by Nicholas A. Tonelli, CC BY 2.0.

    Hemlock woolly adelgid predator beatles released

    January 19, 2016 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. As part of the ongoing effort to combat the hemlock woolly adelgid in the Southern Appalachians, the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission recently released predator beetles into Buncombe County’s Sandy Mush Game Lands. The hemlock woolly adelgid is an Asian insect, accidently introduced to the United States, which attacks and kills our native hemlock trees. There are a couple of methods to counter the adeligd – the first is chemically treating individual trees.  Learn more...

  • The rising sun paints a row of mountains beautiful shades of purple.
    Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Photo by Steve Harwood, CC BY-NC 2.0.

    Great Smoky Mountains National Park firewood restrictions

    January 5, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. I’ve previously spoke about a proposal by Great Smoky Mountains National Park to limit the spread of invasive insects into the park by limiting the type of firewood that could be brought into the park, and come March 2015, those news rules will go into effect. Firewood has long been known to be a vector for accidentally moving insects around, which can be a tremendous problem if it happens to be carrying invasive insects – it can very quickly enable those insects to spread their range into virgin territory, to the detriment of native forests.  Learn more...

  • A white fuzz developing along the stems of a pine tree.
    Hemlock woolly adelgid, an exotic insect pest. Photo by Nicholas A. Tonelli, CC BY 2.0.

    Combating invasive exotic plants in the Southern Appalachians

    May 15, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Invasive exotic species are plants and animals that are not from here but have been introduced and are thriving in the absence of their natural controls, to the detriment of our native species. Kudzu is perhaps the most famous of these, a Japanese plant widely planted in the last century, but there are a host of others, including the chestnut blight that removed chestnuts from our Appalachian forests, the balsam woolly adelgid which has killed Fraser firs on our highest mountaintops, and the hemlock woolly adelgid which is killing hemlock trees.  Learn more...

  • A white fuzz developing along the stems of a pine tree.
    Hemlock woolly adelgid, an exotic insect pest. Photo by Nicholas A. Tonelli, CC BY 2.0.

    Recent research into hemlock mortality

    July 24, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The death of hemlock trees from the hemlock woolly adelgid is an increasingly widespread and well-known phenomena, but what remains a mystery is exactly how this will impact the future of Southern Appalachian forests. The movement of carbon through a natural community can have a profound affect on the type of plant community at a site. A team of researchers working at the Coweeta Hydrological Laboratory in Macon County, North Carolina looked at how carbon cycling is impacted by hemlock woolly adelgid infestations, comparing the decline of infested trees to girdled trees, or trees whose flow of nutrients and water had been cut off.  Learn more...

  • A white/grey bird with black markings on its head and throat.
    Chickadee. Photo by Tim Lenz, CC BY 2.0.

    State of the birds

    July 17, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The children on our street often congregate in the yard with the best play set, but recently the bright yellow slide in the yard was ruled off limits. Not because it isn’t safe, rather a chickadee made a nest in a birch stump next to the base of the slide. Chickadees are one of a handful of Eastern forest birds that successfully adapt to urban and suburban areas, however the situation has not been as good for many birds over the past forty years.  Learn more...

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