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Tag: Gulf

The content below has been tagged with the term “Gulf.”

Articles

  • A beige agricultural landscape dotted by hundreds of small ponds.
    The Prairie pothole region is also known as the "Duck Factory". Photo by Krista Lundgren, USFWS.

    BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill settlement funds migrate north

    April 27, 2015 | 4 minute read

    Most of us, if given a choice, would steer clear of potholes. Many migratory birds, however, actively seek out potholes – provided you’re talking about the thousands of temporary, seasonal, and semi- permanent wetlands wetlands known as “potholes” that are found in the prairies of the Northern Great Plains. Despite their importance to wildlife, these shallow wetland “potholes” are often drained, filled, or degraded by development and agricultural practices. With its mission focus on wetlands restoration and conservation, the Service naturally has placed a priority on enhancing, restoring and acquiring bird habitat in what’s known as the Prairie Pothole Region.  Learn more...

  • A tiny turtle hatchling covered in sand.
    Green sea turtle hatchling at Archie Carr National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Keenan Adams, USFWS.

    Five things you need to know

    April 20, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Did you know that the good health of the Gulf of Mexico depends on places far from the Gulf Coast? Thirty-one states (more than 50% of the contiguous US) have rivers, creeks, and streams that eventually drain into the Gulf of Mexico. The Gulf of Mexico watershed includes states as far away as Montana and New York! Did you know that it is actually very easy to cause additional harm to the environment when cleaning up oiled shorelines?  Learn more...

News

  • TWo biologists on a beach wearing gloves photograph and document a dead sea gull.
    Information icon A USFWS biologist documents the GPS coordinates for a dead gull found in Gulfport, Mississippi, during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Photo by Bonnie Strawser, USFWS.

    Service employees lead studies on toxic and physical effects of oil on birds

    August 3, 2016 | 2 minute read

    The USFWS led efforts to assess the injury to bird species caused by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.  Read the full story...

  • TWo biologists on a beach wearing gloves photograph and document a dead sea gull.
    Information icon A USFWS biologist documents the GPS coordinates for a dead gull found in Gulfport, Mississippi, during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Photo by Bonnie Strawser, USFWS.

    Deepwater Horizon oil spill killed as many as 102,000 birds across 93 species

    June 1, 2016 | 5 minute read

    In order to hold those responsible for an oil spill accountable for injury and death of wildlife biologists estimate the total number of animals killed, which can be a difficult process.  Read the full story...

  • Bright green needles emerge from a central cone of a longleaf pine tree
    Information icon Longleaf pine needles. Photo by Dot Paul, USDA NRCS.

    Seeing the forest for the trees

    April 6, 2016 | 3 minute read

    More than 30 animal species that depend on longleaf pine forests are federally listed as endangered or threatened, and many more are considered to be at-risk. This is why the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is working with partners to restore longleaf pine across the southeastern United States.  Read the full story...

  • Kemps ridley sea turtle laying in the sand. Large with grey shell and yellow body with grey speckles.
    Kemps ridley sea turtle. Photo by NER Sea Turtle Stranding Network.

    New report assesses the impacts of emerging threats on Gulf coast species and ecosystems

    November 13, 2015 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today released its Gulf Coast Vulnerability Assessment (GCVA), a comprehensive report that evaluates the effects of climate change, sea level rise and urbanization on four Gulf Coast ecosystems and 11 species that depend on them. The ecosystems are mangrove, oyster reef, tidal emergent marsh and barrier islands. The species are roseate spoonbill, blue crab, clapper rail, mottled duck, spotted seatrout, eastern oyster, American oystercatcher, red drum, black skimmer, Kemp’s ridley sea turtle and Wilson’s plover.  Read the full story...

  • Two brown pelicans fly in for a landing on the rocky shoreline.
    Brown pelicans flying near Queen Bess Island off Grand Isle, LA during BP oil spill response. Photo by Tom MacKenzie USFWS.

    Using sound science, the service addresses urgent habitat needs for birds and other wildlife along the Gulf coast

    July 8, 2010 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is coordinating efforts along the Gulf Coast to safeguard wildlife such as shorebirds, waterfowl, marsh birds, sea birds, and sea turtles from the effects of oil. Working closely with state, federal and non-government partners, the Service is identifying the most pressing habitat needs of these at-risk species, recommending strategic habitat conservation activities to address those needs, and helping to implement projects along the coast from Florida to Texas.  Read the full story...

  • Wide based trees emerge from a swamp covered in green pondweed.
    Bald Cypress Swamp at Wapanocca National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Genevieve Shank CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    Salazar unveils special edition duck stamp cachet public can purchase to support Gulf wildlife refuges

    July 2, 2010 | 3 minute read

    Memphis, Tennessee — Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar today unveiled a special edition Federal Duck Stamp envelope, or cachet, which hunters, birding enthusiasts, stamp collectors and other conservationists, can purchase for $25 – or $10 more than the cost of a regular Duck Stamp — to help conservation efforts in the Gulf of Mexico. The funds will be used to acquire wetlands for inclusion in national wildlife refuges along the Gulf Coast.  Read the full story...

Podcasts

  • Two bright white birds with red patches on their face and long slender legs standing in the a dormant grassy field.
    Information icon Whooping cranes. Photo by D. Serverson, USFWS.

    Whooping cranes headed south

    January 3, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Ten of the world’s most endangered birds recently flew across the Southern Appalachians, led by a trio of ultra-light aircraft. The birds were the 10th group of whooping cranes to be escorted from Wisconsin in an ongoing effort to establish a new flock of migrating whooping cranes. For years all of the migrating wild cranes were part of a flock that flew between Wisconsin and Texas, however several years ago a project came together to establish an eastern flock of the cranes, flying between Wisconsin and Florida.  Learn more...

  • Two gloved workers wearing protective glasses soap up and clean an oiled bird.
    Two workers clean an oiled northern gannet. Photo by Bonnie Strawser, USFWS.

    Oil spill impacts that may be felt in the mountains

    May 25, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The Deep Horizon oil spill continues to make headlines as oil keeps pouring into the Gulf of Mexico and the slick spreads. In a glimmer of good news, the Fish and Wildlife Service recently reported that the first two oiled birds found in the oil spill, a northern gannet and a brown pelican, were cleaned and released at Pelican Island National Wildlife Refuge, safely on the east coast of Florida.  Learn more...

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