skip to content

Tag: Gulf

The content below has been tagged with the term “Gulf.”

Articles

  • two yellow flowers growing out of very sandy soil.
    Information icon Ground chokecherry. Photo by USFWS.

    Sowing plants to reap dunes

    February 28, 2018 | 4 minute read

    Restoration biologist Kate Healy felt the sun on her face as she stood on a sandy stretch of beach along Alabama’s Gulf coast. It was an unseasonably warm day on Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge, and Healy, a biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Gulf Restoration Office in Fairhope, Alabama, was ready to get to work. Kate Healy and Jackie Sablan plant ground chokecherry at Bon Secour National Wildlife Refuge in Alabama.  Learn more...

  • Three Native American men stand in front of a sign.
    Information icon Coushatta Tribe members (from left) Bertney Langley, Ernest Sickey and Gardner Rose show a sign that honors the habitat restoration partnership between the tribe and the Service. Photo courtesy of the Coushatta Tribe.

    Woven from the Landscape

    January 23, 2018 | 4 minute read

    Before the United States was settled by Europeans, longleaf pine forests covered about 90 million acres of the Southeast. Most of these forests were logged for turpentine and lumber, and by 1975 they had been reduced to about 5 million acres. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is working with countless private landowners, state and federal agencies and conservation groups, to restore the glory of the longleaf. The motivation for many of these conservationists is to help the many at-risk and endangered birds and wildlife that thrive in longleaf forests from the red-cockaded woodpecker to the gopher tortoise.  Learn more...

  • A tiny white and brown mouse held by a biologist.
    Perdido Key beach mouse. Photo by USFWS.

    The mouse that roared

    December 13, 2017 | 7 minute read

    Pensacola, Florida – Pity the big-eared, bug-eyed Perdido Key Beach mouse. Buffeted by hurricanes, threatened by development, and stalked by cats, the thumb-sized mouse had all but disappeared from the sliver of beach outside this bustling Gulf Coast town. A decade ago, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service feared extinction. Paw prints from a Perdido Key beach mouse. Photo by USFWS. Today? “The mouse is doing pretty well right now,” said Kristi Yanchis, a Service biologist and beach mouse expert.  Learn more...

  • A tiny loggerhead hatchling hustles towards the ocean.
    Loggerhead hatchling meets ocean. Photo by Becky Skiba, USFWS.

    Moonlighting in Alabama

    November 6, 2017 | 5 minute read

    Lisa was keeping a watchful eye on a sea turtle nest, which laid beneath the sand. A Share the Beach volunteer for more than 16 years, Graham knew the routine: a female sea turtle nested in that spot two months ago, which meant the eggs could hatch at any time.  Learn more...

  • Men in hard hats and yellow safety vests line up for lunch.
    “The Fish and Wildlife people have just been tremendous,” said school principal Jim Ragusa. “They’ve been working their butts off.” Photo by Phil Kloer, USFWS.

    A tiny town hit hard by Irma

    September 17, 2017 | 9 minute read

    Everglades City, Florida - Billy Snyder stood in mud-caked boots in his mud-caked living room, or what used to be his living room before Hurricane Irma roared in. Kayla Kimmel, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist, talks to homeowner Billy Snyder in his ruined living room in Everglades City. “Having people come in who can get big parts of [the job] done takes a lot of the stress off,” she said.  Learn more...

  • A man in protective gear uses a chainsaw to cut a fallen tree.
    Fallen tree at National Key Deer Refuge. Photo by USFWS.

    ‘Lots of new help here,’ as recovery picks up and residents begin returning

    September 16, 2017 | 5 minute read

    Big Pine Key, Florida – Hurricane Irma hammered the Florida Keys a week ago Sunday and the recovery has been a whirl of progress and promise.  Learn more...

  • Palm and mangrove trees snapped like twigs.
    Information icon Damaged palm trees and mangroves on Cudjoe Key, Florida. Photo by Glenn Fawcett, U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

    Service employees joining Irma response effort

    September 15, 2017 | 7 minute read

    Big Pine Key, Florida – It had all the makings of a thankless, dangerous and depressing task, but Jon Wallace knew – or thought he knew – what he was facing.  Learn more...

News

  • A dozen large birds on the edge of a mangrove island.
    Information icon Brown pelican chicks on mangrove island. Photo by Tom MacKenzie, USFWS.

    How to manage 45 important coastal species in the face of environmental changes

    October 3, 2017 | 3 minute read

    Salt marshes, mangrove forests, and barrier beaches are home to a diversity of wildlife species, and when these coastal ecosystems are intact and functional, they benefit communities as well as wildlife.  Read the full story...

  • A small deer with velvet covered antlers in a recently burned forest.
    A Key deer in velvet. Photo by USFWS.

    Irma leaves plenty of food and water for key deer

    September 13, 2017 | 2 minute read

    If you’re worried about Florida Key deer dying of thirst or starvation following Hurricane Irma, an expert on the tiny creatures has one word of advice: don’t. The deer have ample water and more food than they might be able to eat. That’s the opinion of Roel Lopez, the director of the Natural Resources Institute at Texas A&M University. He studied the animals, a subspecies of white-tailed deer, for his doctoral thesis.  Read the full story...

  • A group of USFWS personnel in a circle for a meeting.
    Incident Commander a Sami Gray briefs N MS Task Force team before heading into Big Pine Key to provide support following hurricane. Photo by USFWS.

    Service crews head south

    September 13, 2017 | 2 minute read

    Hurricane Irma had hardly dissipated before U.S. Fish and Wildlife (Service) crews headed south, tracing in reverse the path the storm had cut across Florida and Georgia. In trucks and cars they crossed into Florida, or headed for south Georgia. The teams are bringing fuel, water, food, chainsaws and more to look after people and places in Irma’s path. Crews ran into “logistical challenges” on interstates crowded with evacuees headed home, said Sami Gray, who is leading the Service’s response effort.  Read the full story...

Contact Us:

Looking for a media contact? Reach out to a regional spokesperson.

Share this page

Tweet this page on Twitter or follow @USFWSsoutheast

Share this page on Facebook or follow USFWSsoutheast.

LinkedIn

Share this page on LinkedIn