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Tag: Gulf

The content below has been tagged with the term “Gulf.”

Articles

  • Men in hard hats and yellow safety vests line up for lunch.
    “The Fish and Wildlife people have just been tremendous,” said school principal Jim Ragusa. “They’ve been working their butts off.” Photo by Phil Kloer, USFWS.

    A tiny town hit hard by Irma

    September 17, 2017 | 9 minute read

    Everglades City, Florida - Billy Snyder stood in mud-caked boots in his mud-caked living room, or what used to be his living room before Hurricane Irma roared in. Kayla Kimmel, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologist, talks to homeowner Billy Snyder in his ruined living room in Everglades City. “Having people come in who can get big parts of [the job] done takes a lot of the stress off,” she said.  Learn more...

  • A man in protective gear uses a chainsaw to cut a fallen tree.
    Fallen tree at National Key Deer Refuge. Photo by USFWS.

    ‘Lots of new help here,’ as recovery picks up and residents begin returning

    September 16, 2017 | 5 minute read

    Big Pine Key, Florida – Hurricane Irma hammered the Florida Keys a week ago Sunday and the recovery has been a whirl of progress and promise.  Learn more...

  • Palm and mangrove trees snapped like twigs.
    Information icon Damaged palm trees and mangroves on Cudjoe Key, Florida. Photo by Glenn Fawcett, U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

    Service employees joining Irma response effort

    September 15, 2017 | 7 minute read

    Big Pine Key, Florida – It had all the makings of a thankless, dangerous and depressing task, but Jon Wallace knew – or thought he knew – what he was facing.  Learn more...

  • Several manatee silhouettes from below with sun beams.
    Manatees at Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge, FL. Photo by David Hinkel, USFWS.

    ‘I had to do something’

    September 11, 2017 | 3 minute read

    He was sick of watching the televised radar images, that big red storm heading steadily his way. With Hurricane Irma still hours south of his Bradenton home, Marcelo Clavijo said he’d had enough.  Learn more...

News

  • A small deer with velvet covered antlers in a recently burned forest.
    A Key deer in velvet. Photo by USFWS.

    Irma leaves plenty of food and water for key deer

    September 13, 2017 | 2 minute read

    If you’re worried about Florida Key deer dying of thirst or starvation following Hurricane Irma, an expert on the tiny creatures has one word of advice: don’t. The deer have ample water and more food than they might be able to eat. That’s the opinion of Roel Lopez, the director of the Natural Resources Institute at Texas A&M University. He studied the animals, a subspecies of white-tailed deer, for his doctoral thesis.  Read the full story...

  • A group of USFWS personnel in a circle for a meeting.
    Incident Commander a Sami Gray briefs N MS Task Force team before heading into Big Pine Key to provide support following hurricane. Photo by USFWS.

    Service crews head south

    September 13, 2017 | 2 minute read

    Hurricane Irma had hardly dissipated before U.S. Fish and Wildlife (Service) crews headed south, tracing in reverse the path the storm had cut across Florida and Georgia. In trucks and cars they crossed into Florida, or headed for south Georgia. The teams are bringing fuel, water, food, chainsaws and more to look after people and places in Irma’s path. Crews ran into “logistical challenges” on interstates crowded with evacuees headed home, said Sami Gray, who is leading the Service’s response effort.  Read the full story...

  • Three men meet before deloying with heavy equipment.
    Information icon USFWS employees at Mississippi Sandhill Crane finalize their equipment and supply checks before responding to Florida to support the Irma recovery response in Florida. Photo by USFWS.

    Service assesses damage, starts cleanup

    September 12, 2017 | 3 minute read

    Hurricane Irma, once a category 5 storm, has nearly played itself out. As of Tuesday, Sept. 12, the storm that howled up the west coast of Florida had dwindled to gusts and rain over North Carolina – a tempest, still, but nothing like the terror that came ashore two days earlier. Weather in Florida is returning to what is normal this time of year, said Kevin Scasny, a meteorologist with the U.  Read the full story...

  • Radar or Irma.
    Information icon Irma marches north. NOAA/NASA.

    Irma continues its assault on Southeast

    September 11, 2017 | 2 minute read

    Hurricane Irma pushed north from Florida early Monday morning leaving behind miles of downed trees and power lines with Georgia and Alabama next in her dangerous sites. Roughly 7 million Floridians remained without power, yet fears of widespread death and destruction proved, thankfully, unfounded. Virtually every U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service employee, from Key West National Wildlife Refuge to Piedmont NWR, was safe and accounted for, according to mid-morning field reports.  Read the full story...

  • A deer similar in appearance to a white-tailed deer, but much smaller in size
    A Key deer on Big Pine Key in Florida. Photo by Garry Tucker, USFWS.

    Key deer among many Florida Keys species facing Irma

    September 11, 2017 | 4 minute read

    Less than a year after surviving a rugged screwworm infestation, the Florida Keys’ Key deer now must contend with Hurricane Irma. Some fans of the endangered species are worried. Catastrophic storms like Irma raise questions about wildlife, nature and impacts to their populations. At the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Florida Keys National Wildlife Refuges Complex, there are nearly 25 threatened and endangered wildlife and plants. “When you know there are 130 mile-per-hour winds and 10 feet of storm surge shoving into the Keys, that’s big,” said Dan Clark, project leader for the complex.  Read the full story...

  • A swirling cloud mass south of Florida.
    Information icon Hurricane Irma from space. Satellite image by NOAA/NASA.

    Irma reaches Florida, heads north

    September 10, 2017 | 2 minute read

    Hurricane Irma sped up early Sunday morning before hitting the Florida Keys, returning to Category 4 status with top speeds of 130 mph. And, for the first time ever, Atlanta was placed under a tropical storm warning. Irma arrived just east of Key West about 9 a.m. Although shifting somewhat westerly, Irma now targets Fort Myers and Tampa where peak gusts could reach 160 mph. Hurricane Irma forecasted path.  Read the full story...

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