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Tag: Gulf

The content below has been tagged with the term “Gulf.”

Articles

  • Thousands of pelicans dot an island landscape shot from above
    Information icon Aerial view of Queen Bess Island, which supports an important brown pelican rookery in Louisiana. Photo by Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.

    Streamlined environmental compliance process benefits brown pelican rookery

    August 20, 2019 | 4 minute read

    “Good Queen Bess” (a.k.a. Queen Elizabeth I) is credited with putting an end to a period of instability in mid-16th century England. Unfortunately, the tiny scrap of land in Louisiana that bears her name, Queen Bess Island, has been anything but stable. The island, located about two-and-a-half miles north of Grand Isle in Barataria Bay, has been sinking and eroding into the Gulf of Mexico. This is a matter of concern, as Queen Bess Island supports the third largest brown pelican rookery in Louisiana.  Learn more...

  • Thousands of pelicans dot an island landscape shot from above
    Information icon Aerial view of Queen Bess Island, which supports an important brown pelican rookery in Louisiana. Photo by Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.

    A head start on healing

    July 16, 2019 | 4 minute read

    “Good Queen Bess” (a.k.a. Queen Elizabeth I) is credited with putting an end to a period of instability in mid-16th century England. Unfortunately, the tiny scrap of land in Louisiana that bears her name, Queen Bess Island, has been anything but stable. The island, located about two and a half miles north of Grand Isle in Barataria Bay, has been sinking and eroding into the Gulf of Mexico. This is a matter of concern, as Queen Bess Island supports the third largest brown pelican rookery in Louisiana.  Learn more...

  • Tall, yellow cylindrical plants growing on wet ground
    Information icon Trumpet pitcher plants. Photo © Atlanta Botanical Garden, used with permission.

    Seeps and springs and pitcher plants

    June 17, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Long ago, before Florida’s Panhandle was ditched, drained, paved and primed for development, there existed a rich tapestry of bogs, dunes, lakes and forests alongside the Gulf of Mexico. Bulldozers all but wiped out the rare coastal habitat. Pockets, though, remain. Pockets of pitcher plants and pine lilies; of seepage slopes and wet prairies; of wiregrass and sedges; and of butterflies and bees. Pine lily. Photo © Atlanta Botanical Garden, used with permission.  Learn more...

  • Pelicans dot an island landscape shot from above with a single large pelican flying near the elevated camera.
    Information icon A brown pelican soars over others on Queen Bess Island, Louisiana. Photo by USFWS.

    Island restoration project and partnerships playing key role in future of the brown pelican

    June 14, 2019 | 3 minute read

    It may not be widely known that Louisiana, the Pelican State, had lost for almost a decade all of its namesake brown pelicans. In the early 1900’s Louisiana’s brown pelican population was estimated at 50,000 to 80,000. The widespread use of the insecticide DDT, however, took a huge toll on many bird species, including the brown pelican. By 1963, the bird was no longer found anywhere in the state. Today, the birds are back and their numbers around the state are staying steady.  Learn more...

  • A large white ferry called the Turtle Runner out of Gulf Breeze, FL off the coast of Pensicola.
    Information icon Turtle Runner is one of two ferryboats paid for with Deepwater Horizon oil spill settlement funds. Photo by the National Park Service.

    Deepwater Horizon settlement-funded ferryboats highlight the wonders of Pensacola Bay

    June 12, 2019 | 3 minute read

    This August will mark 460 years since Spanish explorer and Conquistador Tristán de Luna sailed 11 vessels into what is now known as Pensacola Bay and established the nation’s oldest (but short-lived) European settlement. Now two 150-passenger catamaran-style ferryboats are plying those waters, thanks to settlement funds resulting from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill’s Natural Resource Damage Assessment (DWH NRDA) process. The ferries, which started service last year, began running from downtown Pensacola from a new $3.  Learn more...

  • A pine forest with trees snapped in half by high winds and a bent speed limit sign
    Information icon Tyndall Air Force Base pine forests were scissored by Hurricane Michael. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    Opportunity from disaster

    June 7, 2019 | 7 minute read

    Panama City, Florida — Hurricane Michael savaged Tyndall Air Force Base with 160 mph winds that nearly destroyed the base and everything, including the trees, within its deadly path across the Panhandle. Damage to Tyndall alone topped $3 billion. Three-fourths of the pines on the 29,000-acre base between the Gulf of Mexico and East Bay were sheared in half. Tyndall lost $14 million in harvestable timber. Blackhawk helicopters fly over Tyndall Air Force Base.  Learn more...

Gulf-Restoration

  • A tiny loggerhead hatchling hustles towards the ocean.
    Loggerhead hatchling meets ocean. Photo by Becky Skiba, USFWS.

    Conclusion

    The Service believes through collaboration with partners and other stakeholders, together we can significantly increase the probability of successful Gulf of Mexico restoration.to conserve, protect and enhance the fish, wildlife, plants and habitat of the Gulf of Mexico region.  Learn more...

  • A lush green coastal landscape with colorful sky at dusk.  A barge is barely visible in the distance.
    Information icon LCC partners know that landscapes such as this Gulf cordgrass prairie require science-based conservation actions that take into account the effects of current and future environmental stresses. Photo by Woody Woodrow, USFWS.

    Partnerships: Landscape Conservation Cooperatives

    The Service collaborates with partners and other stakeholders to conserve, protect and enhance the fish, wildlife, plants and habitat of the Gulf of Mexico region.  Learn more...

  • Service employee wearing a beige USFWS uniform shirt standing on a boat calling someone on his cell phone.
    U.S. Fish and Wildlife employee Drew Wirwa stays in touch via cellphone while out in the field. Photo by Tom MacKenzie, USFWS.

    Contact Us

    Service Gulf Restoration staff work across the Gulf of Mexico watershed in habitat conservation, restoration, science, environmental compliance and communications.  Learn more...

News

  • A biologist dressed for cold weather holds an acient-looking fish on a boat at sea
    Information icon Biologist Albert Spells with Atlantic sturgeon. Photo by USFWS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status review of Atlantic sturgeon (Gulf subspecies)

    April 11, 2019 | 2 minute read

    As part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries will jointly conduct a five-year status review of the Atlantic sturgeon (Gulf subspecies). This fish, federally listed as threatened, is found along the coasts and in the rivers of Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, and Mississippi. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning the Atlantic sturgeon on or before June 10, 2019.  Read the full story...

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