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Tag: Greers Ferry National Fish Hatchery

The content below has been tagged with the term “Greers Ferry National Fish Hatchery.”

Articles

  • Deep tire tracks scar a dirt road that cuts through a forest.
    An unpaved road. Photo by Chris Gorski, CC BY-ND 2.0.

    The dirt road connection

    August 29, 2017 | 3 minute read

    Judge Stacey Avey has been serving on the bench for 17 years in Arkansas’ Stone County, a rural county in the Ozarks a little south of the Arkansas-Missouri state line. There are 13,000 people there, and a lot of unpaved dirt and gravel roads. Thanks to a new multi-partner project called the Arkansas Unpaved Roads Program, some of those roads are now in much better shape, which benefits both the residents and the wildlife, including some endangered and at-risk species, that live there.  Learn more...

News

  • A light brown fish with bright orange markings on the tops of its fins.
    Information icon Yellowcheek darter. Photo by J.R. Shute, Conservation Fisheries, Inc.

    Recovery plan available for endangered yellowcheek darter

    July 5, 2018 | 2 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is announcing the availability of the final recovery plan for the yellowcheek darter, a fish listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The yellowcheek darter is a small fish native to the Little Red River basin in Arkansas. It is found in headwater streams with clear water, permanent flow, moderate to strong riffles, and gravel, rubble, and boulder substrates. Historically, the yellowcheek darter has been found in the Little Red River and its four major forks (Devils, Middle, South, and Archey) in Cleburne, Searcy, Stone, and Van Buren counties.  Read the full story...

  • A light brown fish with bright orange markings on the tops of its fins.
    Information icon Yellowcheek darter. Photo by J.R. Shute, Conservation Fisheries, Inc.

    Draft recovery plan for endangered yellowcheek darter available

    March 6, 2017 | 5 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announces the availability of the draft recovery plan for the yellowcheek darter, afish federally-listed as endangered. The public is invited to submit written comments concerning the recovery plan through May 5, 2017. The yellowcheek darter grows up to 2.5 inches total length and is only found in the Devils, Middle, South, and Archey forks of the Little Red River in Arkansas. This small darter is threatened primarily by factors associated with the present destruction, modification, or curtailment of its habitat or range.  Read the full story...

  • A grass like plant with a large geometric shaped bulb.
    Golden sedge (Carex lutea) growing next to a pond cypress tree in Pender County, NC. Photo by Dale Suiter, USFWS.

    Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of 33 southeastern species

    May 19, 2014 | 5 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of 25 endangered and eight threatened species occurring in one or more of the 10 states in the Southeast and the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. The public is invited to provide written information and comments concerning these species on or before May 27, 2014. These five-year reviews will ensure listing classifications under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) are accurate.  Read the full story...

  • A brown fish with red fins.
    Information icon Yellowcheek darter. Photo © J.R. Shute, Conservation Fisheries International.

    Service to hold public information meeting on proposed Critical Habitat for the yellowcheek darter

    February 10, 2012 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announces a public information meeting to share information and answer questions about a proposal to designate critical habitat for the endangered yellowcheek darter. The public information meeting will be held at the Petit Jean Electric Cooperative, 270 Quality Drive, in Clinton, Arkansas on February 22, 2012, from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Biologists will be available during the informational meeting to discuss the August 9, 2011, listing action taken last August and the critical habitat proposal released in October.  Read the full story...

Podcasts

  • A colorful yellow and red trout covered in small black spots.
    Information icon A wildlife biologist holds a rainbow trout. Photo by Mark Lisac, USFWS.

    Cold water species and climate change

    September 14, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. New research on the effects of warming temperatures and stream acidity projects average habitat losses of around 10 percent for coldwater aquatic species in southern Appalachian national forests – including up to a 20 percent loss of habitat in the Pisgah and Nantahala National Forests. The researchers, from the Forest Service, Oregon State University, and E&S Environmental Chemistry, focused on streams draining seven national forests in the southern Appalachian region, first mapping out how much of the area’s current habitat is suitable for acid- and heat-sensitive animals such as the native eastern brook trout.  Learn more...

  • A colorful green/brown and red trout covered in small red spots.
    Information icon A wildlife biologist holds a small eastern brook trout. Photo by Steve Droter, Chesapeake Bay Program.

    Whirling disease and North Carolina

    September 7, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Whirling disease, a parasitic disease affecting trout and salmon, has been found in North Carolina. The disease, native to Europe, affects trout and salmon by damaging nerves and cartilage, which may result in abnormal whirling or tail-chasing behavior. Other signs are a black tail and deformities to the head or body. These abnormalities in behavior and body make the fish more susceptible to predation and make it more difficult for the fish to find food.  Learn more...

  • A colorful yellow and red trout covered in small black spots.
    Information icon A wildlife biologist holds a rainbow trout. Photo by Mark Lisac, USFWS.

    Gill lice in North Carolina

    August 17, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Fresh off of discovering whirling disease for the first time in North Carolina, fisheries biologists with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission recently confirmed gill lice on rainbow trout in three North Carolina streams. Gill lice—which are actually tiny, white crustaceans—attach to a fish’s gill, which can inhibit the fish’s ability to breathe. While most fish are able to tolerate a moderate infestation of gill lice, some fish, particularly those suffering from other stressors like drought or high water temperatures, can succumb.  Learn more...

  • A brown and black amphibian in a plastic container.
    Ozark hellbender. Photo by Jill Utrup, USFWS.

    Ozark hellbender

    January 23, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Once you see a hellbender, you never forget it. Hellbenders are salamanders, but not just any salamanders. They’re big salamanders. Growing up to three feet in rare instances, it’s fairly easy to comes across individuals at least a foot long here in the Southern Appalachians. Despite their size, they’re essentially harmless to humans and are part of a healthy stream ecosystem.  Learn more...

Wildlife

  • A colorful green/brown and red trout covered in small red spots.
    Information icon A wildlife biologist holds a small eastern brook trout. Photo by Steve Droter, Chesapeake Bay Program.

    Brook trout

    The brook trout is a fish native to the eastern United States, and is often referred to as speckled trout, spotted trout, brookie, and squaretail. “Brookies” are considered an indicator species, because they help indicate the health or overall quality of the waters they inhabit.  Visit the species profile...

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