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Tag: Great Smoky Mountains National Park

The content below has been tagged with the term “Great Smoky Mountains National Park.”

Podcasts

  • A dozen people in waders engaging with the river
    Haywood County leaders exploring the Pigeon River. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Teacher water quality workshops

    September 29, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Deep Creek flows out of the southern side of Great Smoky Mountains National Park, just outside of Bryson City. A popular weekend spot, entering the park by Deep Creek takes you through a gauntlet of tube rental companies, doing their part to help people enjoy the stream. On a recent Monday afternoon, this popular spot was besieged by a group of teachers from Swain, Macon, and Jackson Counties.  Learn more...

  • A low-growing green plant with a flower forming.
    Ginseng flower forming. Photo by Forest Farming, CC BY-ND 2.0.

    Charges of trafficking in ginseng

    September 8, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. One of my oldest daughter’s first camping trips was to the Cosby section of Great Smoky Mountains National Park. It was a delightful weekend, early in the season before the campground had become crowded. As a gateway to the Smokies, Cosby is a little off the beaten path and the area definitely locks the commercial development of Gatlinburg or Cherokee, offering up a far more subdued experience with low-key groceries and tourist offerings perhaps a little reminiscent of an earlier age in mountain tourism.  Learn more...

  • A whimsical photo from a valley looking up at a mountain surrounded by swirling clouds.
    Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Photo by The Shared Experience, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    100th anniversary of the Weeks Act

    August 18, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. In much heralded celebrations, Great Smoky Mountains National Park celebrated their 75th anniversary last year and the Blue Ridge Parkway is currently celebrating their 75th anniversary. As important as those are, next year brings an even bigger anniversary – the event that led to the creation of the National Forests in the Eastern U.S. 2011 marks the 100th anniversary of the Weeks Act, the law that authorized the federal government to purchase land and establish national forests in the Eastern United States.  Learn more...

  • A yellow and black bee lands on a bright pink/purple flower.
    Bee at a Heller’s blazing star flower. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Poaching a threat to our natural heritage

    January 19, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript A South Dakota man was recently convicted in federal court for smuggling leopard parts into the United States in a case that exposed illegal hunting in South Africa and the laundering of rare animal parts through Zimbabwe. However, illegal trade in plants and animals is not limited to cats from Africa or orchids from South America. Sadly, it happens right here in the Southern Appalachians as well. The region is home to the bog turtle, North America’s smallest turtle, and the victim of a vibrant trade in rare reptiles despite being federally protected.  Learn more...

  • The rising sun paints a row of mountains beautiful shades of purple.
    Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Photo by Steve Harwood, CC BY-NC 2.0.

    George Masa demonstrates the difference one person can make

    October 16, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Having studied a little photojournalism in college, photography has become a resurgent interest of mine and I was caught by a recent cover of the Mountain Xpress, Asheville’s alternative weekly newspaper. It has a striking image of Great Smoky Mountains National Park, taken by George Masa. Masa was a driving force behind the creation of the park, which celebrates its 75th anniversary this year.  Learn more...

  • A fuzzy bat bearing its teeth with white fungus covering its face.
    Information icon Little brown bat from Avery County with White Nose Syndrome. Photo by Gabrielle Graeter, NCWRC.

    Southern Appalachians face white nose syndrome

    July 10, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. White nose syndrome, an affliction of unknown origin that is fatal to bats, has been confirmed in two Virginia counties, the first cases in the Southern Appalachians. First documented in New York in 2006, WNS has killed tens of thousands of bats as it spread north and south. The affliction takes its name from the white-tufts of fungus that often grow on the muzzles of infected bats, however, it’s unknown if this fungus is the cause of the problem or merely taking advantage of a diseased and weakened bat.  Learn more...

  • A shiny green insect burrowed into a tree.
    Emerald ashe borer. Photo by USDA.

    Protecting the Southern Appalachians from the emerald ash borer

    October 12, 2008 | 3 minute read

    Transcript Good morning and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. This week we’ll look at ash trees and what’s casting a shadow over their future. Soon temperatures will warm and Southern Appalachia’s minor-league baseball stadiums will come to life. Baseball is a relatively slow-moving game, and it’s the crack of the bat that brings pause to conversations and lingering eyes back to the field. Focused on the action, few people ever give much thought to the bat.  Learn more...

  • A dozen children check out small insects that were collected in the river.
    Students gathered around the macroinvertebrate table. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Connecting people with nature

    June 27, 2008 | 3 minute read

    Transcript Good morning and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. As we enter summer, this week we’ll look at a growing movement to get kids outside. We’re blessed on our street with fourteen kids between 2 and 18, turning our residential street into an extension of everyone’s living room. This year’s crop of 17-year cicadas had everyone excited for a couple of weeks. Kids walked up and down the street, filling plastic containers with the abandoned shells of juvenile insects.  Learn more...

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