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Tag: Great Smoky Mountains National Park

The content below has been tagged with the term “Great Smoky Mountains National Park.”

Podcasts

  • The rising sun paints a row of mountains beautiful shades of purple.
    Clingmans Dome at Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Photo by Matthew Paulson, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    Great Smoky Mountains National Park visitation

    January 19, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. For the fourth time in 80 years, Great Smoky Mountains National Park had over ten million annual visitors in a single year. In 2014, 10,099,275 visitors visited the park, an 8% increase over 2013. The other years when visitation topped ten million were 1987, 1999, 2000. These numbers are good news for a lot of folks. They give the National Park Service something to cheer about and they demonstrate the park’s economic power, as more visitors means more people spending money in the communities around the park.  Learn more...

  • The rising sun paints a row of mountains beautiful shades of purple.
    Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Photo by Steve Harwood, CC BY-NC 2.0.

    Great Smoky Mountains National Park firewood restrictions

    January 5, 2015 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. I’ve previously spoke about a proposal by Great Smoky Mountains National Park to limit the spread of invasive insects into the park by limiting the type of firewood that could be brought into the park, and come March 2015, those news rules will go into effect. Firewood has long been known to be a vector for accidentally moving insects around, which can be a tremendous problem if it happens to be carrying invasive insects – it can very quickly enable those insects to spread their range into virgin territory, to the detriment of native forests.  Learn more...

  • A mountainous overlook
    Cataloochee Valley overlook. Photo by Carl Wycoff, CC BY 2.0.

    Cataloochee heritage

    November 3, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. In 1910, there were 1251 people living in Cataloochee Valley – divided between Little and Big Cataloochee, making it collectively the largest community in the Smoky Mountains at the time. The coming of Great Smoky Mountains National Park brought an end to the community, but the creation of the park also meant the preservation of several buildings in the Cataloochee Valley, providing us a glimpse of what life was like there one hundred years ago.  Learn more...

  • A stack of aged firewood
    Firewood. Photo by Chris Warren, CC BY-NC 2.0.

    Great Smoky Mountains National Park and heat-treated firewood

    July 28, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Officials at Great Smoky Mountains National Park are proposing to help protect park forests by further limiting the type of firewood brought into the park. Non-native, tree-killing insects and diseases can be unknowingly introduced into the park through firewood transported from infested areas. The park proposes reducing this threat by changing park rules to allow only heat-treated wood to be brought into the park for campground fires.  Learn more...

  • Hundreds of floating yellow lights in the forest
    Fireflies. Photo by N G, CC BY-SA 2.0.

    Synchronous firefly viewing

    May 19, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. This year, firefly viewing at the Elkmont Campground area of Great Smoky Mountains National Park will be from June 4 through June 11. Every year in late May or early June, thousands of visitors gather near the popular Elkmont Campground to observe the naturally occurring phenomenon of Photinus carolinus; a firefly species that flashes synchronously. Access to the viewing area is provided by shuttle from the Sugarlands Visitor Center.  Learn more...

  • A NC biologist holding a sicklefin redhorse on a river bank in front of a hydroelectric dam.
    Information icon North Carolina biologist TR Russ holding an sicklefin redhorse. Photo by Mark Cantrell, USFWS.

    Rare fish recovery

    February 10, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Culminating a 20-year partnership with the state of Oregon, the Army Corps of Engineers, and private landowners, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently proposed removing the Oregon chub from the federal endangered species list. If it goes through, this would be the first fish delisted due to recovery. Fewer than 1,000 fish were known to exist when it was placed on the endangered species list.  Learn more...

  • A whimsical photo from a valley looking up at a mountain surrounded by swirling clouds.
    Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Photo by The Shared Experience, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    Economic benefits of Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    February 8, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Great Smoky Mountains National Park has long held the title of the nation’s most visited national park, but a recent study shows it holds the top spot in terms of visitor spending. The study estimates that in 2010 the park’s 9 million visitors spend more than $818 million in the gateway communities around the park and that 11,367 local jobs were supported by park visitor spending.  Learn more...

  • A whimsical photo from a valley looking up at a mountain surrounded by swirling clouds.
    Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Photo by The Shared Experience, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    Opportunity to live as a park ranger

    February 1, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Most people don’t get the opportunity to spend a day with biologists snorkeling a river looking for mussels, hiking through the high country keeping tabs on northern flying squirrels, or going underground to check on bat populations. I’m blessed in that I get to do all of those things on occasion. Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Friends of the Smokies, and the Great Smoky Mountain Association are offering an opportunity for local business, civic, and educational leaders to get a behind the scenes look at the national park.  Learn more...

  • A low-growing green plant with a flower forming.
    Ginseng flower forming. Photo by Forest Farming, CC BY-ND 2.0.

    Conviction of Cosby poacher

    January 18, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. I previously spoke about the arrest and conviction of Johnny Carl Grooms of Cosby, Tennessee for conspiring to distribute oxycodone and cocaine, interstate travel to further drug trafficking, possession of oxycodone with the intent to distribute, distribution of cocaine, possession of firearms by a convicted felon, and illegally trafficking in ginseng. Grooms was recently sentenced, and his crimes earned him more than 24 years in prison.  Learn more...

  • A green and brown frog with large round eyes resting on a rock.
    Ginseng flower forming. Photo by Courtney Celley, USFWS.

    Volunteers tracking amphibians

    January 11, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. In the depths of winter, it may be a little hard to think ahead to early spring, but soon spring peepers, tiny frogs found across the Eastern United States and among the first frogs to emerge and begin mating, will begin their calling. The emergence of frogs and toads across North Carolina brings with it the emergence of citizen scientists who venture forth to help biologists track the distribution and well-being of frog and toad populations.  Learn more...

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