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Tag: Grays Lily

The content below has been tagged with the term “Grays Lily.”

Articles

  • Bright red flowers emerge from a bog with a forest in the background.

    A unique mountain refuge protects endangered wetlands and the wildlife within

    August 24, 2017 | 8 minute readEast Flat Rock, North Carolina – It’s not much to look at really. Nothing about this all-too-familiar stretch of Southern blacktop indicates that a rare, beautiful and endangered flower thrives just beyond the railroad tracks. There’s a convenience store, a small engine repair shop, a few modest homes. General Electric makes lights at a factory up the road. Bat Fork Creek meanders nearby. Below the tracks, though, in an Appalachian mountain bog, bunched arrowheads rise from soggy ground. Learn more...

    Mountain sweet pitcher plant patch in Butt CPA. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

News

  • A spiny flower with thin, bright purple petals.

    2016 National and Regional Recovery Champions

    May 19, 2017 | 8 minute readOn Endangered Species Day, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Southeast Region celebrates the contributions and achievements of our nationally recognized Recovery Champions and regionally recognized Recovery Champions. These dedicated individuals have devoted themselves to recovering endangered and threatened animals and plants, and the Service is grateful for their hard work. 2016 National Recovery Champions Chris Lucash, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Chris Lucash in the field monitoring for red wolves. Read the full story...

    Smooth Purple Coneflower, Echinacea laevigata. Photo by Suzanne Cadwell, CC BY-NC 2.0.

Podcasts

  • A yellow and black bee lands on a bright pink/purple flower.

    Poaching a threat to our natural heritage

    January 19, 2010 | 2 minute readTranscript A South Dakota man was recently convicted in federal court for smuggling leopard parts into the United States in a case that exposed illegal hunting in South Africa and the laundering of rare animal parts through Zimbabwe. However, illegal trade in plants and animals is not limited to cats from Africa or orchids from South America. Sadly, it happens right here in the Southern Appalachians as well. The region is home to the bog turtle, North America’s smallest turtle, and the victim of a vibrant trade in rare reptiles despite being federally protected. Learn more...

    Bee at a Heller’s blazing star flower. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

  • Three goats go to work eating overgrown vegetation.

    Goats aid in the conservation of one of the Southern Appalachians most important areas

    October 26, 2008 | 3 minute readTranscript Good morning and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. This week, we’ll look at a curious project to protect one of the Southern Appalachians’ most important natural areas. No mountain in the Southern Appalachians goes above tree-line – the elevation above which conditions become inhospitable for trees, yet we have mountains without trees on their peaks. Instead of forest, these peaks are covered with grassy fields, known as balds, offering some of the most spectacular views in the region. Learn more...

    Goats grazing. Photo by Courtney Celley, USFWS.

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