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Tag: Gray Bat

The content below has been tagged with the term “Gray Bat.”

Articles

  • A brown, furry bat attached to the roof of a humid cave
    Information icon A tri-colored bat Fern Cave National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Michael Senn, USFWS.

    To the bat cave!

    July 25, 2019 | 8 minute read

    Paint Rock, Alabama — Nothing really distinguishes Nat Mountain from its hilly neighbors amid the southern foothills of the Appalachian Mountains. It’s not particularly tall at 1,600 feet. It offers no sweeping summertime views, except snatches of distant mountains and the curvaceous Paint Rock River. It’s home to the Fern Cave National Wildlife Refuge, but, on the surface, there’s really nothing to do here. It’s what’s below ground that tantalizes.  Learn more...

  • A brown bat attached to the roof of a cave with white fuzz around its nose
    Information icon In this 2016 photo, a tri-colored bat with evidence of White Nose Syndrome (WNS) hibernates on the wall of the Black Diamond Tunnel in the North Georgia mountains. Photo by Pete Pattavina, USFWS.

    Malady deadly to bats found in North Carolina

    February 9, 2011 | 4 minute read

    White-nose syndrome, the disease that has killed hundreds of thousands of bats in the Eastern United States, has been discovered in a retired Avery County mine and in a cave at Grandfather Mountain State Park, marking the arrival of the disease in North Carolina. “White-nose syndrome is confirmed in Virginia and Tennessee, so we expected we would be one of the next states to see the disease,” said Gabrielle Graeter, a biologist with the N.  Learn more...

Podcasts

  • Dozens of brown bats with long ears attached to the roof of a cave in a cluster.
    Cluster of Virginia big-eared bats (Corynorhinus townsendii virginianus). Photo by Dave Riggs, CC BY-SA 2.0.

    North Carolina’s endangered bats

    September 10, 2013 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. 2013 marks the 40th anniversary of the Endangered Species Act, an anniversary we’re marking by taking a closer look at some of the endangered species of the Southern Appalachians. In the eastern United States, it’s hard to talk about bat conservation without mentioning white nose syndrome – the bat disease that’s decimating many species as it spreads from the New York area where it was first discovered.  Learn more...

  • A fuzzy bat bearing its teeth with white fungus covering its face.
    Information icon Little brown bat from Avery County with White Nose Syndrome. Photo by Gabrielle Graeter, NCWRC.

    White-nose syndrome in Kentucky

    May 1, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature In addition to horses and bourbon, Kentucky is known for its caves, and indeed, is home to Mammoth Cave National Park, with the world’s longest known cave system. Hand in hand with the incredible number of caves is the fact that Kentucky is an incredibly important state for our nation’s bat populations. That’s why the recent news that the bat disease white-nose syndrome was discovered in the state is especially painful.  Learn more...

  • Dozens of brown bats with long ears attached to the roof of a cave in a cluster.
    Information icon Cluster of Virginia big-eared bats (Corynorhinus townsendii virginianus). Photo by Dave Riggs, CC BY-SA 2.0.

    Grants go to help the struggle against White Nose Syndrome

    January 12, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Winter is approaching - a season that has become a time of apprehension among wildlife biologists. White nose syndrome, a mysterious affliction responsible for the deaths of more than a million bats, is most lethal during this time, and the collective hibernation of bats means winter presents the greatest opportunity for spreading the malady. In response to the threat of white nose syndrome, the Fish and Wildlife Service recently announced $800,000 in grants to fund six research projects that will provide insight into this mysterious, menacing threat, and help ensure the survival of some of our rarest bats.  Learn more...

  • A dozen large, flying birds with red markings over the eye.
    Sandhill cranes at Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge in Decatur, AL. Photo by Tim Lumley, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    National Wildlife Refuge Week

    November 6, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. National Wildlife Refuge week is October 11-17. In the Southern Appalachians, where public lands are likely National Forests or National Park Service lands, it’s important to remember wildlife refuges, administered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, for they are the only system of federal lands devoted to wildlife. Across the nation, there are 550 national wildlife refuges, protecting more than 150 million acres, more land than the entire national park system.  Learn more...

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