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Tag: Gopher Tortoise

The content below has been tagged with the term “Gopher Tortoise.”

Articles

  • A deep black snake coiled up on sandy soil with young longleaf pine seedlings in the background
    Information icon An Eastern indigo snake on sandy soil associated with the longleaf pine ecosystem. Photo © Houston Chandler, the Orianne Society (Used with permission).

    Snakes in a bag

    May 25, 2018 | 8 minute read

    Andalusia, Alabama — A gaggle of biologists, zookeepers, college students and government officials traipsed through the Deep South longleaf pine forest one recent, gorgeous spring morning carefully clutching white pillowcases. They were looking for holes. More specifically, gopher tortoise burrows into which they could deposit their precious cargo of Eastern indigo snakes, aka “Emperors of the Forest.” Southern Alabama including Conecuh National Forest. Map by Roy Hewitt, USFWS.  Learn more...

  • Three Native American men stand in front of a sign.
    Information icon Coushatta Tribe members (from left) Bertney Langley, Ernest Sickey and Gardner Rose show a sign that honors the habitat restoration partnership between the tribe and the Service. Photo courtesy of the Coushatta Tribe.

    Woven from the Landscape

    January 23, 2018 | 4 minute read

    Before the United States was settled by Europeans, longleaf pine forests covered about 90 million acres of the Southeast. Most of these forests were logged for turpentine and lumber, and by 1975 they had been reduced to about 5 million acres. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is working with countless private landowners, state and federal agencies and conservation groups, to restore the glory of the longleaf. The motivation for many of these conservationists is to help the many at-risk and endangered birds and wildlife that thrive in longleaf forests from the red-cockaded woodpecker to the gopher tortoise.  Learn more...

  • A military officer in uniform releases a gopher tortoise next to a burrow.
    Col. Matthew Higer, 96th Test Wing vice commander, bends down to release a gopher tortoise into its new home deep within the Eglin Air Force Base. Photo by Samuel King Jr., U.S. Air Force.

    Boosting the gopher tortoise

    August 22, 2017 | 8 minute read

    Atlanta, Georgia – Typically, animals like the Florida panther lose their Southern habitat, dwindle perilously close to extinction and end up on the endangered species list. Federal, state and non-profit groups hustle to raise money and conserve land to bolster the populations with the chance, one day, of delisting it. The gopher tortoise, though, just might buck the trend. An at-risk species in Georgia, Florida and parts of Alabama and South Carolina, the tank-like tortoise is the recipient of an unprecedented, high-dollar collaboration between government agencies, NGOs and the private sector to keep gopherus polyphemus from ever gracing the threatened or endangered species list.  Learn more...

  • A many wearing a wide-brimmed hat walking through a forest next to a young longleaf pine seedling.
    Information icon Reese Thompson is working with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and others to conserve a natural longleaf pine stand on his south Georgia land. Photo by Bill O’Brian, USFWS.

    Longleaf pine for Georgians

    August 22, 2017 | 9 minute read

    Longleaf pine trees once blanketed the landscape from southern Virginia to east Texas. They were majestic hallmarks of the Southeast.  Learn more...

  • A gentleman with a grey mustache standing next to a mature longleaf pine tree.
    Information icon Longleaf pines, says Salem Saloom, are "part of our heritage." Photo by Mark Davis, USFWS.

    Growing trees, saving species

    August 9, 2017 | 8 minute read

    If one of the Southeast’s signature species is the gopher tortoise, so, too, is the towering pine that shades its burrow. The longleaf pine is one of the Southeastern United States’ great trees. When European settlers came to North America, they discovered Pinus palustris. It stretched across 90 million acres, from east Texas to Virginia, and was just what a young nation needed to grow. The wood from the conifer built homes, sailing masts and even roads.  Learn more...

  • Two finely manicured hands reach for a tiny gopher tortoise hiding in its shell on sandy soil.
    Information icon A gopher tortoise hiding in its shell. Photo by Ben Williams.

    Florida couple dedicates property to conservation

    July 20, 2017 | 2 minute read

    Ben and LouAnn Williams own approximately 3,400 acres of pinelands interspersed with bottomland hardwoods in Putnam County, Florida, between Jacksonville and Daytona Beach. Their property contributes to conservation on a regional scale because it is adjacent to publicly owned conservation areas, creating an important link in a chain of conservation lands from central Florida to the Georgia state line. Sandhill after prescribed burn. Photo by Ben Williams. In 2012, the Williams’ began establishing longleaf pine on their property and reintroduced prescribed burning.  Learn more...

  • An open gate surrounded by live oaks covered in Spanish moss.
    Information icon Altama Plantation. Photo by Nicole Vidal, USFWS.

    A gem for hunters and hikers alike

    July 12, 2017 | 4 minute read

    Brunswick, Georgia – Altama Plantation is perhaps the most critical, and intriguing, piece of property along the entire Altamaha River corridor. It was here in the early 1800s that plantation owner James Hamilton Couper introduced the Dutch system of tidal floodgates to grow rice. He planted sugar cane and built a refinery whose red-brick remains still stand. Couper, a noted scientist, also recorded the first eastern indigo snake, a threatened species which bears his name (Drymarchon couperi).  Learn more...

  • A gentlman with gray hair poses for the camera with a smile and his arms crossed.
    Information icon Mr. Dink NeSmith has a special relationship with the Altamaha River. Photo by Nicole Vidal, USFWS.

    Local landowner fights for the Altamaha

    July 12, 2017 | 3 minute read

    Jesup, Georgia – “Well now, welcome to the swamp.” Dink NeSmith stands astride a weathered wooden dock on Sandy Lake, a meandering offshoot of the Altamaha River. To some, the oxbow lake is nothing but a muddy, buggy, alligator-friendly bog. To NeSmith, it’s an open-air cathedral in all its natural “majesty.” “God put it here a long time ago,” he preached, “and it’s on loan to my family and me and we want to do our part to make sure it remains a clean, safe environment for our great, great, great, great grandchildren.  Learn more...

  • The sun sets over a lush green marsh cut in half by a calm brackish channel.
    Information icon Salt marsh along the Altamaha River. Photo by Nicole Vidal, USFWS.

    Many partners work together to protect “the Amazon of the South” for generations to come

    July 12, 2017 | 13 minute read

    It meanders 137 miles through the wild heart of Georgia, a blackwater beauty that nourishes longleaf pine forests, cypress swamps, saltwater estuaries and the barrier islands that protect the Atlantic coast and migratory birds alike.  Learn more...

News

  • October 16 ribbon cutting ceremony to be held at Sansavilla Wildlife Management Area

    October 16, 2017 | 2 minute read

    Mt. Pleasant, Georgia – On Monday, October 16, the Department of Natural Resources will hold a ribbon cutting ceremony to announce the acquisition of the final phase of more than 19,000 acres purchased for the Sansavilla Wildlife Management Area. Featuring 12 miles of Altamaha River frontage and one of the largest gopher tortoise populations in Georgia, the area provides fishing opportunities, wildlife watching locations, canoeing, boating, and hunting for deer, turkey, and small game species.  Read the full story...

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