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Tag: Gopher Tortoise

The content below has been tagged with the term “Gopher Tortoise.”

Articles

  • A stand of very short pine trees with long stringy pine leaves
    Information icon Longleaf pine is the favorite habitat of many at-risk species, including the Gopher tortoise. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    Partners for Fish and Wildlife restore habitat to benefit gopher tortoise

    August 11, 2020 | 2 minute read

    The gopher tortoise, one of the signature species of the Southeastern United States, is considered an at-risk species. That means it is not yet classified as endangered or threatened under the Endangered Species Act, but it needs a lot of conservation assistance to stay off that list. A survey of a parcel of land in Calhoun County, Georgia, found far more gopher tortoises than expected. Photo by Georgia Department of Natural Resources.  Learn more...

  • Hundreds of pelicans flying over a shoreline
    Information icon Brown Pelicans flying over St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Nicole Rankin, USFWS.

    Florida shorebird surveys underway thanks to creative staffing

    July 16, 2020 | 3 minute read

    Crystal-clear waters and white sandy beaches are two features you will find at St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses St. Vincent Island in the northwestern portion of the Florida Gulf coast. Besides being surrounded by pristine Outstanding Florida Waters, the barrier island refuge is also an important safe haven for at-risk species, including gopher tortoise, Florida red-bellied turtles, and black rail birds. It is an important stop-over point for neotropical migratory birds - birds that breed in North America but spend winters in Mexico, Central America, South America or the Caribbean islands.  Learn more...

  • A photograph taken from a bank between two trees of a beautiful marsh with golden vegetation
    Information icon Bluffs of St. Teresa Photo by SVN Saunders, Ralston, Dantzler Real Estate.

    Florida Panhandle land deal will help recreation and wildlife conservation

    June 11, 2020 | 2 minute read

    The state of Florida will soon acquire more than 17,000 acres in the Panhandle, adding a key conservation piece to the burgeoning wilderness corridor that includes the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. The St. Teresa Bluffs tract runs nearly 17 miles along the Ochlockonee River and Apalachee Bay and abuts the refuge on its western edge near Panacea. Rare plants and mussels, including the sculptured pigtoe, as well as gopher tortoises, pine snakes, alligators, black bears and bald eagles abound.  Learn more...

  • An aerial photograph of a meandering river cutting through a marsh
    Information icon Overhead view of Cabin Bluff and Ceylon properties. Photo © Mac Stone.

    History, both natural and human, lives in Georgia coastal preserve

    June 9, 2020 | 7 minute read

    Woodbine, Georgia — The state’s newest Wildlife Management Area sits a half mile off Interstate 95, yet a world removed from the hurly-burly of modern life. Pass the entrance on Ceylon Road, which runs through some of the Southeast’s most beautiful and pristine coastal lands, and step back in time. Stately stands of longleaf pine and live oak, some two centuries old, tower over savannah-like prairies and freshwater wetlands. More than 4,000 burrows, home to at-risk gopher tortoises, dot the landscape.  Learn more...

  • A lone pine tree stands tall on a narrow peninsula along a bay
    Information icon Weeks Bay marsh, Alabama. Photo by Weeks Bay NERR.

    Gateway to Weeks Bay conserved for future generations

    June 2, 2020 | 3 minute read

    Whether gliding through the mouth of Weeks Bay by motor or paddle craft, the first strip of land that catches a voyager’s eye is the East Gateway Tract. The tract is roughly 175 acres of critically important and diverse land that includes micro-dune habitat, tidal streams, marshland, and forested wetlands. The water surrounding East Gateway is a prime fishing location with a prevalence of redfish and speckled trout, which is not to be outdone by the bird watching opportunities on the tract, as it provides wonderful habitat for migratory birds.  Learn more...

  • A deep black snake coiled up on sandy soil with young longleaf pine seedlings in the background
    Information icon An Eastern indigo snake on sandy soil associated with the longleaf pine ecosystem. Photo © Houston Chandler, the Orianne Society (Used with permission).

    22 Eastern Indigo Snakes just released in annual effort to return America’s longest snake to North Florida

    May 8, 2020 | 8 minute read

    Tallahassee, Florida — In an enthusiastic launch of year four of the 10-year effort to return the essential, native, non-venomous apex predator to the region, 22 eastern indigo snakes have just been released in northern Florida. This collaborative program continues the annual release of snakes, listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act and raised specifically for recovery of the species, to The Nature Conservancy’s Apalachicola Bluffs and Ravines Preserve (ABRP) in Bristol.  Learn more...

  • A low-growing shrub with leaves like sand dollars
    Information icon A rare hairy rattleweed plant. Photo by Daniel Chapman, USFWS.

    Learning to love a hairy rattleweed

    February 18, 2020 | 6 minute read

    Brunswick, Georgia — It sounds like the name of a punk rocker, or an illicit drug. It lurks under power lines, along roadsides and between rows of commercial pine trees. It’s covered in tiny, cobwebby hairs. It’s got a shape only a botanist could love. Pity the little-known, inelegantly named hairy rattleweed, or Baptisia arachnifera. It is one of the nation’s rarest plants, found in only two southeast Georgia counties and federally listed as an endangered species.  Learn more...

  • An upland forest edge after mechanical thinning
    Information icon Grand Bay habitat area after mastication. Photo by USFWS.

    Deepwater Horizon settlement Funds help Mississippi coastal habitats

    December 17, 2019 | 2 minute read

    Habitat management activities are well underway on the Deepwater Horizon Natural Resource Damage Assessment Grand Bay Land Acquisition and Habitat Management Project.  Learn more...

  • A calm river banked on both sides by tall trees.
    Information icon Groton Plantation fronts 24 miles of the Savannah River. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    What the world used to look like

    December 11, 2019 | 8 minute read

    Estill, South Carolina — The descendants of John Winthrop, founder of the Massachusetts Bay Colony nearly 400 years ago, recently set aside 14,000 acres along the Savannah River that will forever remain undeveloped. It is the largest private conservation easement in South Carolina history. Its significance, though, goes well beyond the creation of a natural bulwark against overdevelopment and forest loss. A bevy of private, commercial, nonprofit and government donors, including the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, cobbled together the $12.  Learn more...

  • A green toad with dark spots in a biologist’s gloved hand
    Information icon Biologists at the Saratoga National Fish Hatchery in Wyoming hopped at the chance to raise the endangered Wyoming toad. Photo by USFWS.

    They’re growing what?

    November 6, 2019 | 9 minute read

    In Virginia and South Carolina hatcheries, biologists keep a close eye on shad and striped bass while taking time to focus on something that will never wear scales: mussels. And down in Florida, hatchery scientists charged with making sure rivers and streams are stocked with catfish and bass are singing the praises of a tiny bird they’re raising outside their labs. The Tishomingo National Fish Hatchery is growing alligator snapping turtles to boost that species’ population.  Learn more...

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