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Tag: Ginseng

The content below has been tagged with the term “Ginseng.”

Podcasts

  • A low-growing green plant with a flower forming.
    Ginseng flower forming. Photo by Forest Farming, CC BY-ND 2.0.

    New rules for ginseng permits

    October 21, 2013 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Citing concerns over declines in wild ginseng, the supervisor of the Pisgah and Nantahala National Forests is limiting ginseng harvest in those areas. A permit is required to harvest wild ginseng on National Forests, and it must be collected during a designated harvest season. Some of this year’s changes include: The number of annual permits issued will be reduced to 136 permits, a 75 percent reduction from recent years.  Learn more...

  • A small woodpecker perched on a pine tree.
    Information icon In 2018, there were 38 active clusters of endangered red-cockaded woodpeckers on this property in Alabama, thriving there under a Safe Harbor Agreement. Composite photo by Mark Bailey.

    Sustainable harvest of forest products

    July 27, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Ginseng and goldenseal are widely known and used for their purported medicinal properties. Galax is a native plant harvested for use in flower arrangements. White oak is used in traditional Cherokee basket weaving. The Southern Appalachians are home to a botanical bounty of wild plants that have found plenty of human uses. In many cases, behind those uses is a market where these plants are bought and sold, usually legally, sometimes not so.  Learn more...

  • A low-growing green plant with a flower forming.
    Ginseng flower forming. Photo by Forest Farming, CC BY-ND 2.0.

    Conviction of Cosby poacher

    January 18, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. I previously spoke about the arrest and conviction of Johnny Carl Grooms of Cosby, Tennessee for conspiring to distribute oxycodone and cocaine, interstate travel to further drug trafficking, possession of oxycodone with the intent to distribute, distribution of cocaine, possession of firearms by a convicted felon, and illegally trafficking in ginseng. Grooms was recently sentenced, and his crimes earned him more than 24 years in prison.  Learn more...

  • A green and brown frog with large round eyes resting on a rock.
    Ginseng flower forming. Photo by Courtney Celley, USFWS.

    Volunteers tracking amphibians

    January 11, 2012 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. In the depths of winter, it may be a little hard to think ahead to early spring, but soon spring peepers, tiny frogs found across the Eastern United States and among the first frogs to emerge and begin mating, will begin their calling. The emergence of frogs and toads across North Carolina brings with it the emergence of citizen scientists who venture forth to help biologists track the distribution and well-being of frog and toad populations.  Learn more...

  • A low-growing green plant with a flower forming.
    Ginseng flower forming. Photo by Forest Farming, CC BY-ND 2.0.

    Ginseng trade conviction

    June 20, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Following a four-day trial in U.S. District Court, a jury convicted Johnny Carl Grooms of Cosby, Tennessee, of conspiring to distribute oxycodone and cocaine, interstate travel to further drug trafficking, possession of oxycodone with the intent to distribute, distribution of cocaine, possession of firearms by a convicted felon, and illegally trafficking in ginseng. Grooms’s sentencing is set for October 3, and he faces up to life in prison as well as fines of over $8 million.  Learn more...

  • Bright red flowers emerge from a bog with a forest in the background.
    Mountain sweet pitcher plant patch in Butt CPA. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Southern Appalachian poaching

    January 30, 2011 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. It seems this winter has seen a flurry of activity in the capture and prosecution of wildlife smugglers. In mid-December a German man was arrested for smuggling hundreds of live tarantulas, including protected species, into the United States through the U.S. mail. In late December two smugglers plead guilty to breaking federal law in connection to their attempt to smuggle Cuban pigeon eggs into the country, running the risk of bringing avian disease into the United States.  Learn more...

  • A low-growing green plant with a flower forming.
    Ginseng flower forming. Photo by Forest Farming, CC BY-ND 2.0.

    Charges of trafficking in ginseng

    September 8, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. One of my oldest daughter’s first camping trips was to the Cosby section of Great Smoky Mountains National Park. It was a delightful weekend, early in the season before the campground had become crowded. As a gateway to the Smokies, Cosby is a little off the beaten path and the area definitely locks the commercial development of Gatlinburg or Cherokee, offering up a far more subdued experience with low-key groceries and tourist offerings perhaps a little reminiscent of an earlier age in mountain tourism.  Learn more...

  • A low-growing green plant with a flower forming.
    Ginseng flower forming. Photo by Forest Farming, CC BY-ND 2.0.

    Poaching our natural heritage

    March 16, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature The common name ginseng refers to several species in the Panax genus, including Panax ginseng, found in east Asia, and Panax quinquefolius, often called American ginseng, found here in the United States. Both are used in traditional Chinese medicine. American ginseng has been harvested from the southern Appalachians and sold to Chinese markets for generations. Unfortunately wild ginseng fetches the highest prices, and harvesting wild ginseng has proved unsustainable.  Learn more...

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