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Tag: Georgia

The content below has been tagged with the term “Georgia.”

Articles

  • A forrested stream with rocky shores.
    Raccoon Creek. Photo by Brett Albanese, Georgia DNR.

    The remaking of Raccoon Creek

    May 1, 2018 | 7 minute read

    Braswell, Georgia – A long and unusually cold Southern winter had the anglers itching to pick up rods and hit Raccoon Creek, one of the southernmost trout streams in the country. First, though, duty called. Nearly 50 retirees, teachers, builders, students and wildlife officials shouldered axes, clippers, shovels and chainsaws and gathered at aptly named Trout Stocking Road for a morning spent scouring the creek’s banks. The local Trout Unlimited members cleared trails, trimmed branches and picked up trash, all the while taking mental notes of pools, riffles and unimpeded casting spots.  Learn more...

  • A turtle with a dark shell and orang spots surrounded by fallen leaves
    Information icon The spotted turtle's shell makes it a prize in the pet trade. It is illegal to trap the reptile, whose range extends from Maine to Florida. Photo by Mark Davis, USFWS.

    Here, spot!

    April 20, 2018 | 8 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service considers spotted turtles at risk of being listed under the Endangered Species Act; they work with the Orianne Society, as well as other organizations, to learn more about the turtle.  Learn more...

  • A young hunter crouches while holding a rife in the woods.
    Information icon Codey Elrod, hog control technician with the Georgia Department of Natural Resources. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    Hunting the wild hog

    April 9, 2018 | 10 minute read

    Codey Elrod has a job most Southern hunters would kill for. Literally. My job,” Elrod said, “is to kill hogs.” And he gets paid for it.  Learn more...

  • A man standing in front of a large pine tree trunk
    Information icon Tarver, who grew up in Alabama, is a longleaf fan. His property, 200 miles south of Atlanta, is named Longleaf Plantation. Photo by Mark Davis, USFWS.

    Safe harbor for woodpeckers

    January 29, 2018 | 8 minute read

    Newton, Georgia – They’d probably spent 20 minutes touring the forest when the agent and potential buyer stopped. The client took it all in – the southwest Georgia sky, a blue that got only deeper as it reached to heaven; and, closer to earth, the longleaf pines, their brilliant green needles prickling that lovely sky. That was enough for Charley Tarver. He turned to the agent. Charley Tarver bought a plantation in southwest Georgia 18 years ago and has turned it into a habitat for the red cockaded woodpecker, or RCW.  Learn more...

  • Winner of 2017 Okefenokee photo contest announced during Pioneer Days

    December 21, 2017 | 2 minute read

    The winner of Okefenokee’s third annual photography contest is Stefan Mazzola. He took a beautiful photo of the night sky over Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge during a three-day overnight trip to Monkey Lake. His photo was one of more than 90 submissions. Everyone who participated in this event helped to capture the essence of the refuge. The photos range from subjects of birds and alligators, to families and sunrises. The contest occurs each year in late summer with submissions being accepted until September 30.  Learn more...

  • Chattahoochee Forest hosts Fannin County High School students

    December 20, 2017 | 1 minute read

    On Nov. 29, 2017, Fannin County High School Agriculture Class students visited Chattahoochee Forest National Fish Hatchery in Georgia. Project leader Kelly Taylor and program assistant Crystal Thomas provided a tour of the hatchery grounds. Taylor spoke with students about hatchery operations, stocking, volunteering and careers with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. He encouraged interested students to apply for Youth Conservation Corps positions offered during the summer and explained that the program provides good experience for those aiming for an education and career in working with the Service.  Learn more...

Faq

  • Beaverpond marstonia presumed extinct

    December 28, 2017 | 2 minute read

    The Service says the beaverpond marstonia is presumed to be extinct, but is not stating definitively it is extinct. What is the difference? As required by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the Service used the best available scientific and commercial information in evaluating the status of the beaverpond marstonia. As a result of multiple surveys conducted since the last time the species was documented in 2000, no individuals have been located.  Learn more...

News

  • A painting of a bird witch a white head and black white and brown feathers along its wings and back.
    Information icon Rayen Kang’s acrylic rendition of an emperor goose took home the Georgia Junior Duck Stamp Best of Show. Painting by Rayen Kang.

    2018 Georgia Junior Duck Stamp student art competition winners chosen

    April 11, 2018 | 4 minute read

    For the third year in a row, Rayen Kang, an 18-year-old student at the First Fine Art & Design Studio in Johns Creek has been announced as the winner of the annual 2018 Georgia Junior Duck Stamp Art Competition held Tuesday, April 10, at the Southeast Region U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Office (Service) in Atlanta. Five judges selected Kang’s acrylic rendition of an emperor goose as the Georgia Best of Show.  Read the full story...

  • Secretary Zinke announces more that $1.1 billion for sportsmen and conservation

    March 20, 2018 | 4 minute read

    Horicon, Wisconsin – Today U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke traveled to Horicon, Wisconsin, where he announced more than $1.1 billion in annual national funding for state wildlife agencies from revenues generated by the Pittman-Robertson Wildlife Restoration and Dingell-Johnson Sport Fish Restoration (PRDJ) acts. The Secretary presented a ceremonial check to the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources for $34,966,603 while visiting the Horicon Marsh State Wildlife Area. Download state-by-state listings of the final Fiscal Year 2018 apportionments of the Wildlife Restoration Program fund and the Sport Fish Restoration Program fund.  Read the full story...

  • Tiny South Georgia snail presumed extinct, will not receive federal protection

    December 28, 2017 | 1 minute read

    The beaverpond marstonia, a tiny snail the size of a pencil eraser, was discovered in 1977 in a creek in South Georgia. It’s been 17 years since it was last seen. Based on the best available information, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is announcing today that the beaverpond marstonia is presumed to be extinct. As a result, the agency will not list the species as endangered or threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).  Read the full story...

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