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Tag: Georgia

The content below has been tagged with the term “Georgia.”

Articles

  • Two large white birds flying low over a wetland coming in for a landing with a Service biologist in the foreground
    Information icon Two endangered whooping cranes coming in for a landing. Photo by Greg Pope.

    “Journey of the Whooping Crane” follows efforts to save a rare, endangered bird

    November 30, 2018 | 2 minute read

    In 1940, only about 20 whooping cranes were known to exist. Today, thanks to the diligence of many partners working together in the United States and Canada, there are more than 850 cranes in North America and the population continues to increase slowly and steadily. The iconic bird is one of the success stories of the Endangered Species Act (ESA). But it remains one of the rarest animals in the world.  Learn more...

  • A pine forest with trees snapped in half by high winds and a bent speed limit sign
    Information icon Tyndall Air Force Base pine forests were scissored by Hurricane Michael. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    After Hurricane Michael

    November 29, 2018 | 6 minute read

    Camilla, Georgia — Hurricane Michael barreled across prime Southern timber territory, damaging five million acres of pines and hardwoods and destroying nearly $1.7 billion worth of marketable trees. Habitat for many of the region’s at-risk species — red-cockaded woodpeckers, gopher tortoises, eastern indigo snakes — was sundered. Red-cockaded woodpecker in flight. Photo by Martjan Lammertink, U.S. Forest Service. Now, six weeks after Michael killed more than 45 people in Florida, Georgia, North Carolina and Virginia, forest owners salvage timber, clear stands and pray for a market rebound.  Learn more...

  • A brown sign bent in half by high winds that reads St Vincent NWR
    Information icon The sand-clogged dock with St. Vincent NWR in the background. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    Survivors of the storm

    October 22, 2018 | 6 minute read

    Bradley Smith seeks evidence that the red wolves survived Hurricane Michael off St. Vincent NWR. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS. Apalachicola, Florida — Bradley Smith stood tall on the bow of the SeaArk 21-footer with a VHF antenna held high. It was quiet, too quiet. It had been six days since Hurricane Michael devastated the Panhandle and Smith was listening for signs of life on St.  Learn more...

  • A fallen street sign blown over by high winds reads Mercedes Ave.
    Information icon Hurricane Michael bent the sign for Mercedes Ave. in half. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    The Battle for Mercedes Avenue

    October 14, 2018 | 6 minute read

    Panama City, Florida — The battle for Mercedes Avenue was joined. On one side stood an army of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service sawyers, swampers and heavy-equipment operators. On the other, a seemingly impenetrable forest of hurricane-downed pines and oaks blocking the street and keeping locals, utilities and ambulances from getting through. The Service’s sawyers readying to attack a tree. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS. Hurricane Michael had ripped across the Panhandle destroying houses, businesses and this city’s once-lovely tree canopy with equally reckless abandon.  Learn more...

  • A bowling alley with one wall and part of the roof blown off.
    Information icon A bowling alley on US 98 in the wake of Hurricane Michael. Photo by Dan Chapman.

    Service task forces start assisting in Hurricane Michael recovery

    October 13, 2018 | 5 minute read

    Panama City, Florida – The sawyers and engineers, swampers and commanders arrived in the dark Thursday unable to fully grasp what Hurricane Michael had wrought. But there was no mistaking the devastation when the two-dozen U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service workers woke Friday in this Panhandle town no longer recognizable. Virtually every tree for miles was down or damaged. Roofs disappeared from homes and businesses along U.S. 98 only to be found a block away.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A small black bird flies over a lush green marsh
    Information icon Eastern black rail in flight – Texas, April 2016. Photo © Jesse Huth, used with permission, Huth Avian Services.

    Proposed listing for the eastern black rail

    October 5, 2018 | 12 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is proposing to protect the eastern black rail, a small secretive marsh bird native to the United States, as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Partially migratory, the eastern black rail is known in as many as 36 states, plus multiple territories and countries in the Caribbean and Central and South America. It is one of four subspecies of black rail, which live in salt, brackish, and freshwater marshes.  Learn more...

News

  • New regional director to head southeastern conservation efforts Fish and Wildlife Service

    December 10, 2018 | 2 minute read

    Service officials announced late last month that Leopoldo “Leo” Miranda will head the Service’s Southeast Region. The tract encompasses 10 southeastern states as well as Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.  Read the full story...

  • Four men watch as a fifth release a few dozen ntrout into the Clinch River.
    Information icon Representatives of four state and federal agencies release the first of hundreds of trout into the Clinch River near Knoxville. They gathered recently to sign an agreement to stock trout in watersheds in Tennessee and Georgia. Photo by TVA.

    Making a splash

    November 5, 2018 | 3 minute read

    Clinton, Tennessee — The Clinch River is now richer by a couple hundred extra trout. Other watersheds will soon share that wealth. Four government agencies recently released rainbow, brook, brown and spotted trout into the tailwaters of the Clinch River near Knoxville. Representatives from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), Tennessee Valley Authority, Georgia Department of Natural Resources and the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency took turns dumping nets of wriggling fish into the river — a symbolic gesture underscoring a fruitful partnership.  Read the full story...

  • A colorful trout in hand with a smiling angler in the background.
    Beautiful rainbow trout. Photo by Cale Bruckner, CC BY-NC 2.0.

    TVA, Fish and Wildlife Service to Continue Popular Trout Stocking Program

    October 30, 2018 | 4 minute read

    Knoxville, Tennessee — The Tennessee Valley Authority and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service have reached a multi-agency agreement to provide continued funding for three federal fish hatcheries that have stocked waters in Georgia and Tennessee with millions of trout. The partnership, which began in 2013, includes the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency and the Georgia Department of Natural Resources. Since 2013, TVA has been funding trout production by the Service at three national fish hatcheries: Dale Hollow and Erwin in Tennessee, and Chattahoochee Forest in Georgia.  Read the full story...

  • Seven small brownish-yellow mussels held in open hands by a biologist.
    Information icon Atlantic pigtoes ready for release. Photo by USFWS.

    Fish and Wildlife Service proposes threatened status for declining mussel

    October 10, 2018 | 5 minute read

    The Atlantic pigtoe, a freshwater mussel native to waters from Virginia to Georgia, has lost more than half of its historical range, and remaining populations may not be sustainable over time. To help this species and its habitat, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to extend protection for it as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The Service also has identified areas that are essential for conservation of this freshwater mussel and proposes to designate 539 river miles in 16 units as critical habitat.  Read the full story...

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