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Tag: Georgia

The content below has been tagged with the term “Georgia.”

Articles

  • Two outstretched hands hold a small turtle with yellow markings on its head and tail
    Information icon A search of a creek at the Rock Ranch in central Georgia turned up plants, tadpoles and at least one turtle. The ranch, 70 miles south of Atlanta, hosted more than 200 urban youth recently. They were guests of the Steve & Marjorie Harvey Foundation, which sponsors an annual mentoring program. Photo by Mark Davis, USFWS.

    City comes to the country

    June 25, 2019 | 7 minute read

    Thomaston, Georgia — Rule 1 in the art of angling: You have to master the worm. “Ewww!” The teen holding the fishing rod recoiled at the sight of a wad of wigglers. “No. Uh-uh!” — that, from a buddy peering over his shoulder. And a third reaction, courtesy of a fellow who stood 6-foot-2 or more: “I ain’t touching that!” Thus did the guys from the city get introduced to a bit of country.  Learn more...

  • A sign explains the hirstorical significance of the Florida torreya with a white house in the background.
    Information icon The Gregory House with propped-up torreya. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    Saving the Florida torreya

    April 22, 2019 | 8 minute read

    Bristol, Florida — The Florida torreya was one of the world’s most endangered trees even before Hurricane Michael savaged the remaining wild specimens along the Apalachicola River with 100-plus mph winds in October 2018. It was also one of the most controversial trees, Exhibit A in a roiling debate over how, and where, to keep alive species facing extinction. More than 650,000 torreyas once lined the ridgelines or hugged the ravines near the Apalachicola and Flint rivers.  Learn more...

  • A painting of a white headed duck with teal colored wing feathers swimming in greenish water.
    Information icon 2018-2019 Junior Duck Stamp.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service invites student artists to participate in 2019 Georgia Junior Duck Stamp program competition

    February 19, 2019 | 2 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is currently accepting student entries postmarked by midnight Friday, March 15, for the 2019 Junior Duck Stamp Conservation and Design Program competition. The Georgia Junior Duck Stamp competition recognizes Georgia’s top student waterfowl artists. Public, private, home-schooled, and art studio students from kindergarten through high school are invited to compete for recognition, prizes and scholarships in an activity that promotes the conservation of America’s wetlands and waterfowl habitat.  Learn more...

Chattahoochee-Forest

  • Concrete pad of narrow ponds used to raise fish.
    Information icon Raceways used for rearing fish at Chattahoochee Forest National Fish Hatchery in Suches, GA. Photo by USFWS.

    Chattahoochee Forest National Fish Hatchery

    Chattahoochee Forest National Fish Hatchery is nestled deep in the heart of the North Georgia mountains, approximately 75 miles north of Atlanta. Surrounded by the 749,444 acre Chattahoochee National Forest, the hatchery occupies a 44.8 acre tract of land straddling Mill Creek and Rock Creek, which are tributaries of the Toccoa River. The hatchery produces about one million rainbow trout each year. These fish are stocked into tailwaters, streams and lakes of Northern Georgia in cooperation with the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Corps of Engineers, Tennessee Valley Authority, and the U.  Learn more...

  • A woman in a field of tall grass looks for birds through a pair of binoculars.
    Sue Cameron at Ochlawaha bog. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Document library

    Chattahoochee Forest  Learn more...

  • An outstretched hand holding a dozen tiny bright orange eggs above a bin of thousands more.
    Information icon Rainbow trout eggs. Photo by USFWS.

    Frequently asked questions

    Where can I purchase a fishing license? To review Georgia fishing regulations and to purchase a license, please contact the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Wildlife Resources Division. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service does not issue fishing licenses. Can I go fish and camp nearby? Yes! Fishing is allowed in Rock Creek, which runs through hatchery grounds. Individuals must bring their own fishing gear, bait, license and trout stamp, all of which can be purchased at local stores.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A small fish with brown and white spots swimming in front of small rocks.
    Information icon Trispot darter. Photo by Dick Biggins, USFWS.

    Final listing of the trispot darter, proposed 4(d) rule, proposed critical habitat

    January 30, 2019 | 12 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? Based on a review of the best available information and full status assessment, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is listing the trispot darter as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The Service is also proposing a 4(d) rule and critical habitat. Check out the press release for this decision. What does it mean when a species is threatened?  Learn more...

News

  • A bird of prey flying over a wetland.
    Information icon Everglades snail kite at Lake Kissimmee, Florida. Photo by South Florida Wetland Management District.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of 36 Southeastern species

    April 11, 2019 | 6 minute read

    As part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of 36 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife, and plants. They are found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before June 10, 2019. These five-year reviews will ensure listing classifications under the ESA are accurate, and recommend changes in status where appropriate based on the latest science and analysis.  Read the full story...

  • A duck with a green patch over its eye down the back of its neck with brown head and grey wings on blue water.
    Information icon “A March on the Water,” acrylic rendition by 12-year-old Win Sheng First Fine Art & Design Studio, Johns Creek, Georgia.

    2019 Georgia Junior Duck Stamp student art competition winners

    April 8, 2019 | 3 minute read

    “A March on the Water,” an acrylic painting of a green winged teal by Win Sheng, aged 12, from First Fine Art and Design Studio in Johns Creek, won the 2019 Georgia Junior Duck Stamp Art Competition. The contest was held last week at the Southeast Regional U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Office in Atlanta. “I painted the green winged teal because of all the colors and its personality,” said Win Sheng.  Read the full story...

  • A close-up shot of a small fish with a black line along it’s side and a bright red tip on it’s dorsal fin.
    Information icon Ashy darter. Photo by Conservation Fisheries, Inc.

    Thanks to conservation partnerships, two southeastern fish and a snail do not warrant Endangered Species Act protection

    April 3, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Following extensive scientific reviews, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that three southeastern animals do not face the threat of extinction now or in the foreseeable future. Accordingly, the ashy darter, Barrens darter and Arkansas mudalia snail do not warrant Endangered Species Act (ESA) protection. For each animal, the Service brought together a team of biologists who compiled and examined all known data and research. Their peer-reviewed findings are outlined in species status assessments (SSAs), made available today.  Read the full story...

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