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Tag: Georgia

The content below has been tagged with the term “Georgia.”

Articles

  • Buckets of green, orange and yellow berries in large buckets and bags in the back of a pickup truck bed.
    Information icon Confiscated berries at Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Pamela Garrison, USFWS.

    Berry big business

    July 31, 2020 | 7 minute read

    Folkston, Georgia — The thieves, armed with machetes, travel in packs targeting unsuspecting communities with chilling precision. Sometimes, they’ll hit in the dead of night wearing headlamps as they slink deeper into the forest. Lookouts prowl the roadways alerting the criminals via phone or radio if the authorities approach. Then, with bags full of ill-gotten gains worth thousands of dollars, the bad guys abscond to the next ill-prepared community.  Learn more...

  • Buckets of green, orange and yellow berries in large buckets and bags in the back of a pickup truck bed.
    Information icon Confiscated berries at Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Pamela Garrison, USFWS.

    Berry big business

    July 31, 2020 | 7 minute read

    Folkston, Georgia — The thieves, armed with machetes, travel in packs targeting unsuspecting communities with chilling precision. Sometimes, they’ll hit in the dead of night wearing headlamps as they slink deeper into the forest. Lookouts prowl the roadways alerting the criminals via phone or radio if the authorities approach. Then, with bags full of ill-gotten gains worth thousands of dollars, the bad guys abscond to the next ill-prepared community.  Learn more...

  • An aerial photograph of a meandering river cutting through a marsh
    Information icon Overhead view of Cabin Bluff and Ceylon properties. Photo © Mac Stone.

    History, both natural and human, lives in Georgia coastal preserve

    June 9, 2020 | 7 minute read

    Woodbine, Georgia — The state’s newest Wildlife Management Area sits a half mile off Interstate 95, yet a world removed from the hurly-burly of modern life. Pass the entrance on Ceylon Road, which runs through some of the Southeast’s most beautiful and pristine coastal lands, and step back in time. Stately stands of longleaf pine and live oak, some two centuries old, tower over savannah-like prairies and freshwater wetlands. More than 4,000 burrows, home to at-risk gopher tortoises, dot the landscape.  Learn more...

  • A greenish brown fish with dark brown spots along its side
    Information icon Brown trout. Photo by USFWS.

    Staying indoors leads to getting outdoors

    May 12, 2020 | 5 minute read

    Maybe you’re still sheltering in place, working from home, unable to go to the gym or church. What do you do? Go fishing. Millions of Americans are doing just that — in eye-popping numbers. Cooped up, and without their usual recreational outlets, anglers have taken mightily to the mountain streams, reservoir lakes and coastal waters across the South. The U.S. Department of the Interior’s decision two years ago to expand hunting and fishing opportunities at the nation’s wildlife refuges and fish hatcheries seems particularly fortuitous.  Learn more...

  • A grey and black reticulated salamander walking through the grass
    Information icon Endangered reticulated flatwoods salamander. Photo by Virginia Tech.

    Breakthrough for recovering endangered Florida salamanders encourages scientists

    May 7, 2020 | 3 minute read

    A little good news in these crazy coronavirus times: the very small and federally endangered reticulated flatwoods salamander recently notched a much-needed victory in its long struggle to avoid extinction. Ecologist Harold Mitchell explains: “We translocated salamander larvae to another pond where they successfully turned into metamorphs. This shows that the animals can live if they’re moved from one location to another. That’s never been done before with this species.  Learn more...

Chattahoochee-Forest

  • Concrete pad of narrow ponds used to raise fish.
    Information icon Raceways used for rearing fish at Chattahoochee Forest National Fish Hatchery in Suches, GA. Photo by USFWS.

    Chattahoochee Forest National Fish Hatchery

    At this time, the hatchery raceway area is not open to walk-through by the public due to COVID-19. The visitor kiosk and Rock Creek are open for an enjoyable fishing experience. We encourage you to: Check local hatchery conditions on this website before visiting Follow current CDC safe practices by maintaining a safe distance between yourself and other groups Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth Cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze Most importantly, stay home if you feel sick Learn more about the U.  Learn more...

  • A woman in a field of tall grass looks for birds through a pair of binoculars.
    Sue Cameron at Ochlawaha bog. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Document library

    Chattahoochee Forest  Learn more...

  • An outstretched hand holding a dozen tiny bright orange eggs above a bin of thousands more.
    Information icon Rainbow trout eggs. Photo by USFWS.

    Frequently asked questions

    Where can I purchase a fishing license? To review Georgia fishing regulations and to purchase a license, please contact the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Wildlife Resources Division. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service does not issue fishing licenses. Can I go fish and camp nearby? Yes! Fishing is allowed in Rock Creek, which runs through hatchery grounds. Individuals must bring their own fishing gear, bait, license and trout stamp, all of which can be purchased at local stores.  Learn more...

News

  • An older man points to the sky with a child.
    Information icon Hunting. Photo by USFWS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes more opportunities to hunt, fish across South Atlantic, Gulf and Mississippi Basin

    April 27, 2020 | 5 minute read

    Atlanta, Georgia — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes to expand hunting and fishing opportunities on another 500,000 acres of national wildlife refuge lands across the South. If approved, the new regulations will take effect this fall. In all, 22 refuges will offer more than 110 new or expanded hunting and fishing opportunities — new species to hunt, more acres to hunt and more times to hunt. “We continue to build upon our recent successes to expand our recreational offerings,” said Leo Miranda, an avid hunter and regional director for the South Atlantic-Gulf & Mississippi Basin.  Read the full story...

Warm-Springs-Fish-Technology-Center

  • A welcome sign that reads Warm Springs Regional Fisheries Center, National Fish Hatchery, Fish Health Lab, Fish Technology Center
    Information icon Welcome to the Warm Springs Regional Fisheries Center. Photo by USFWS.

    Warm Springs Fish Technology Center

    Although most hatchery lands and outdoor spaces have remained open for the public to enjoy, we encourage you to: Check local hatchery conditions on this website before visiting Follow current CDC safe practices by maintaining a safe distance between yourself and other groups Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth Cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze Most importantly, stay home if you feel sick Learn more about the U.  Learn more...

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