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Tag: Georgia

The content below has been tagged with the term “Georgia.”

Articles

  • Two large white birds flying low over a wetland coming in for a landing with a Service biologist in the foreground

    “Journey of the Whooping Crane” follows efforts to save a rare, endangered bird

    November 30, 2018 | 2 minute readIn 1940, only about 20 whooping cranes were known to exist. Today, thanks to the diligence of many partners working together in the United States and Canada, there are more than 850 cranes in North America and the population continues to increase slowly and steadily. The iconic bird is one of the success stories of the Endangered Species Act (ESA). But it remains one of the rarest animals in the world. Learn more...

    Two endangered whooping cranes coming in for a landing. Photo by Greg Pope.

  • A pine forest with trees snapped in half by high winds and a bent speed limit sign

    After Hurricane Michael

    November 29, 2018 | 6 minute readCamilla, Georgia — Hurricane Michael barreled across prime Southern timber territory, damaging five million acres of pines and hardwoods and destroying nearly $1.7 billion worth of marketable trees. Habitat for many of the region’s at-risk species — red-cockaded woodpeckers, gopher tortoises, eastern indigo snakes — was sundered. Red-cockaded woodpecker in flight. Photo by Martjan Lammertink, U.S. Forest Service. Now, six weeks after Michael killed more than 45 people in Florida, Georgia, North Carolina and Virginia, forest owners salvage timber, clear stands and pray for a market rebound. Learn more...

    Tyndall Air Force Base pine forests were scissored by Hurricane Michael. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

Chattahoochee-Forest

  • Concrete pad of narrow ponds used to raise fish.

    Chattahoochee Forest National Fish Hatchery

    Chattahoochee Forest National Fish Hatchery is nestled deep in the heart of the North Georgia mountains, approximately 75 miles north of Atlanta. Surrounded by the 749,444 acre Chattahoochee National Forest, the hatchery occupies a 44.8 acre tract of land straddling Mill Creek and Rock Creek, which are tributaries of the Toccoa River. The hatchery produces about one million rainbow trout each year. These fish are stocked into tailwaters, streams and lakes of Northern Georgia in cooperation with the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Corps of Engineers, Tennessee Valley Authority, and the U. Learn more...

    Raceways used for rearing fish at Chattahoochee Forest National Fish Hatchery in Suches, GA. Photo by USFWS.

  • A woman in a field of tall grass looks for birds through a pair of binoculars.

    Document library

    Chattahoochee Forest Learn more...

    Sue Cameron at Ochlawaha bog. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

  • An outstretched hand holding a dozen tiny bright orange eggs above a bin of thousands more.

    Frequently asked questions

    Where can I purchase a fishing license? To review Georgia fishing regulations and to purchase a license, please contact the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Wildlife Resources Division. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service does not issue fishing licenses. Can I go fish and camp nearby? Yes! Fishing is allowed in Rock Creek, which runs through hatchery grounds. Individuals must bring their own fishing gear, bait, license and trout stamp, all of which can be purchased at local stores. Learn more...

    Rainbow trout eggs. Photo by USFWS.

Faq

  • A small fish with brown and white spots swimming in front of small rocks.

    Final listing of the trispot darter, proposed 4(d) rule, proposed critical habitat

    January 30, 2019 | 12 minute readWhat action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? Based on a review of the best available information and full status assessment, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is listing the trispot darter as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The Service is also proposing a 4(d) rule and critical habitat. Check out the press release for this decision. What does it mean when a species is threatened? Learn more...

    Trispot darter. Photo by Dick Biggins, USFWS.

News

  • A small fish with brown and white spots swimming in front of small rocks.

    Unique fish gets endangered species protection with proposed exemptions and critical habitat

    January 30, 2019 | 6 minute readA small, colorful fish found in the Coosa River Basin is now federally protected. On January 29, 2018, the trispot darter was formally recognized as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is now proposing exemptions to otherwise prohibited activities under the ESA. The exemptions, included in a 4(d) rule, mark the ESA’s flexibility in allowing for certain management activities to continue because of their overall benefit to the long-term status of the listed darter. Read the full story...

    Trispot darter. Photo by Dick Biggins, USFWS.

  • A light orange salamander with a bright orange stripe

    Conservation partnerships help keep two birds, salamander and skink from requiring endangered species act protections

    December 18, 2018 | 4 minute readFollowing rigorous scientific reviews, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that, thanks in part to ongoing conservation partnerships, four southeastern animals do not face the threat of extinction now or in the foreseeable future. Accordingly, the MacGillivray’s seaside sparrow, Florida sandhill crane, striped newt and Cedar Key mole skink do not warrant Endangered Species Act (ESA) protection. “Our efforts working closely with diverse partners to proactively understand and address threats to wildlife is succeeding,” said Leo Miranda, the Service’s Southeast regional director. Read the full story...

    Juvenile striped newt. Photo by FWC.

  • National Fish and Wildlife Foundation announces $940,000 in grants from Southeast Aquatics Fund

    December 11, 2018 | 6 minute readWashington, D.C. — The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) today announced $940,000 in grants to conserve and restore habitats for native freshwater aquatic species in focal watersheds within Alabama, Florida and Georgia. The grants will leverage $1.1 million in matching contributions, generating a total conservation impact of more than $2 million. “The Southeast is home to the greatest diversity of freshwater species in the country, many of which are becoming increasingly rare,” said Jeff Trandahl, executive director and CEO of NFWF. Read the full story...

  • New regional director to head southeastern conservation efforts Fish and Wildlife Service

    December 10, 2018 | 2 minute readService officials announced late last month that Leopoldo “Leo” Miranda will head the Service’s Southeast Region. The tract encompasses 10 southeastern states as well as Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Read the full story...

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