skip to content

Tag: Georgia

The content below has been tagged with the term “Georgia.”

Articles

  • An eight-point bucks head emerges from tall green grass
    Information icon White-tailed deer on Seedskadee National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Tom Koerner, USFWS.

    Locally sourced and served

    February 24, 2020 | 7 minute read

    It was a fine day to sit in a tree — cool, the December sun casting shadows across the leafy floor below. Mark Carter didn’t move. The minutes passed. They became an hour. Carter and the man who’d brought him into the woods traded an occasional murmur. The shadows grew longer. Night would soon come to Georgia. Then, just about 100 yards away: a flash of tan in the dwindling light — Odocoileus virginianus, a white-tail deer.  Learn more...

  • A Service employee stands in front of the classroom with three students
    Information icon Project leader Kelly Taylor with Students. Photo by Mrs. Jacquie Tallman, teacher, Union County Middle School in Blairsville, GA.

    Trout in the classroom at Chattahoochee Forest

    February 20, 2020 | 1 minute read

    Project Leader and Fishery Biologist Kelly Taylor spent Jan. 6, 2020, teaching 7th grade science students from Union County Middle School about trout at Chattahoochee Forest National Fish Hatchery.  Learn more...

  • A low-growing shrub with leaves like sand dollars
    Information icon A rare hairy rattleweed plant. Photo by Daniel Chapman, USFWS.

    Learning to love a hairy rattleweed

    February 18, 2020 | 6 minute read

    Brunswick, Georgia — It sounds like the name of a punk rocker, or an illicit drug. It lurks under power lines, along roadsides and between rows of commercial pine trees. It’s covered in tiny, cobwebby hairs. It’s got a shape only a botanist could love. Pity the little-known, inelegantly named hairy rattleweed, or Baptisia arachnifera. It is one of the nation’s rarest plants, found in only two southeast Georgia counties and federally listed as an endangered species.  Learn more...

  • A small spotted frog in a petri dish with wet vegetation.
    Information icon Warm Springs National Fish Hatchery has been raising gopher frogs for three years, a departure from its traditional responsibilities of propagating fish. Photo by USFWS.

    A good year at the hatcheries

    February 5, 2020 | 5 minute read

    The results are in from another year of propagating snakes and birds and tortoises. The verdict? Allan Brown, help us out. “Good,” said Brown, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s (Service) Assistant Regional Director of Fish and Aquatic Conservation. “Actually, better than that. It was great.” Brown oversees a Service office that increasingly focuses on more than just fish. Hatcheries across the region are raising an array of creatures — indigo snakes, Florida grasshopper sparrows and mussels of various stripes, to name a few — in addition to taking care of traditional duties: propagating fish.  Learn more...

  • Service staff stand under a Chattahoochee Forest NFH tent for an event
    Information icon Welcome tent at the Scout event. Photo by Volunteer Scout Leader.

    Chattahoochee Forest NFH (GA) educates scouts about trout fishing

    January 24, 2020 | 1 minute read

    On Nov., 2019, Chattahoochee Forest National Fish Hatchery program assistant Crystal Thomas and volunteer Mike Morton staffed a booth about trout fishing during the 2019 Hornaday Weekend-Atlanta Area Council at the Woodruff Scout Camp in North Georgia. Hundreds of scouts from all over the southeastern United States visited the hatchery booth seeking information about trout fishing, ethics and conservation. Some were seasoned at fishing while others were seeking a first-time experience.  Learn more...

Chattahoochee-Forest

  • Concrete pad of narrow ponds used to raise fish.
    Information icon Raceways used for rearing fish at Chattahoochee Forest National Fish Hatchery in Suches, GA. Photo by USFWS.

    Chattahoochee Forest National Fish Hatchery

    Chattahoochee Forest National Fish Hatchery is nestled deep in the heart of the North Georgia mountains, approximately 75 miles north of Atlanta. Surrounded by the 749,444 acre Chattahoochee National Forest, the hatchery occupies a 44.8 acre tract of land straddling Mill Creek and Rock Creek, which are tributaries of the Toccoa River. The hatchery produces about one million rainbow trout each year. These fish are stocked into tailwaters, streams and lakes of Northern Georgia in cooperation with the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Corps of Engineers, Tennessee Valley Authority, and the U.  Learn more...

  • A woman in a field of tall grass looks for birds through a pair of binoculars.
    Sue Cameron at Ochlawaha bog. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Document library

    Chattahoochee Forest  Learn more...

  • An outstretched hand holding a dozen tiny bright orange eggs above a bin of thousands more.
    Information icon Rainbow trout eggs. Photo by USFWS.

    Frequently asked questions

    Where can I purchase a fishing license? To review Georgia fishing regulations and to purchase a license, please contact the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Wildlife Resources Division. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service does not issue fishing licenses. Can I go fish and camp nearby? Yes! Fishing is allowed in Rock Creek, which runs through hatchery grounds. Individuals must bring their own fishing gear, bait, license and trout stamp, all of which can be purchased at local stores.  Learn more...

News

  • New videos released on the history and future of prairies in the Piedmont

    February 14, 2020 | 2 minute read

    The Piedmont Prairie Partnership, a group of non-profit, state, and federal agencies, just released two videos documenting the history of the Piedmont prairies and the restoration work in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. Historically, much of the Piedmont was covered by prairies, some with scattered trees and some without. These open areas, maintained by fire, elk, bison and other animals, supported large numbers of flowering plants, pollinators, and wildlife including bobwhite quail.  Read the full story...

Warm-Springs-Fish-Technology-Center

  • A welcome sign that reads Warm Springs Regional Fisheries Center, National Fish Hatchery, Fish Health Lab, Fish Technology Center
    Information icon Welcome to the Warm Springs Regional Fisheries Center. Photo by USFWS.

    Warm Springs Fish Technology Center

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Fish Technology Centers (FTC) provide leadership in science-based management of aquatic resources through the development of new concepts, strategies, technologies and techniques to solve problems and develop innovative efficiencies for hatchery operations and for aquatic resource conservation. FTCs were established in 1984 by the Service to provide technical and scientific leadership and guidance to the fish culture community. The Warm Springs Fish Technology Center (WSFTC) was established in 1993, to strengthen fish culture and fish management-related technology development within the Southeast and support other program areas through outreach.  Learn more...

Contact Us:

Looking for a media contact? Reach out to a regional spokesperson.

Share this page

Tweet this page on Twitter or follow @USFWSsoutheast

Share this page on Facebook or follow USFWSsoutheast.

LinkedIn

Share this page on LinkedIn