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Tag: Georgia

The content below has been tagged with the term “Georgia.”

Articles

  • Yellow cone-shaped plants grow in tall grass field
    Information icon Trumpet pitcher plants. Photo courtesy of Atlanta Botanical Garden

    Pitcher plant prairies pop in the Panhandle

    November 18, 2020 | 2 minute read

    The U.S Fish and Wildlife’s Coastal Program is partnering with Florida State Parks and the Atlanta Botanical Garden to let the sun again shine on rare seepage slope and wetland pitcher plant prairies. Over the past nine years, more than 1,500 acres of wetland communities along the Florida Panhandle have benefitted from the habitat restoration work. These native herbaceous wetland communities are inhabited by carnivorous bog plants, orchids, and other rare and at-risk plants that provide habitat for the endangered reticulated flatwoods salamander.  Learn more...

Chattahoochee-Forest

  • Concrete pad of narrow ponds used to raise fish.
    Information icon Raceways used for rearing fish at Chattahoochee Forest National Fish Hatchery in Suches, GA. Photo by USFWS.

    Chattahoochee Forest National Fish Hatchery

    Chattahoochee Forest National Fish Hatchery is nestled deep in the heart of the North Georgia mountains, approximately 75 miles north of Atlanta. Surrounded by the 749,444 acre Chattahoochee National Forest, the hatchery occupies a 44.8 acre tract of land straddling Mill Creek and Rock Creek, which are tributaries of the Toccoa River.  Learn more...

  • A woman in a field of tall grass looks for birds through a pair of binoculars.
    Sue Cameron at Ochlawaha bog. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Document library

    Chattahoochee Forest  Learn more...

  • An outstretched hand holding a dozen tiny bright orange eggs above a bin of thousands more.
    Information icon Rainbow trout eggs. Photo by USFWS.

    Frequently asked questions

    Where can I purchase a fishing license? To review Georgia fishing regulations and to purchase a license, please contact the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Wildlife Resources Division. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service does not issue fishing licenses. Can I go fish and camp nearby? Yes! Fishing is allowed in Rock Creek, which runs through hatchery grounds. Individuals must bring their own fishing gear, bait, license and trout stamp, all of which can be purchased at local stores.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A small fish with tan and brown markings blending into the pebble substrate.
    Information icon Frecklebelly madtom. Photo by USFWS.

    Frecklebelly madtom proposed listing, 4(d) rule and critical habitat frequently asked questions

    November 17, 2020 | 7 minute read

    What is the frecklebelly madtom and where does it occur? The frecklebelly madtom is a small, stout catfish that inhabits the main channels and tributaries of medium to large river systems in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and Tennessee. The fish has a broad but scattered distribution across the Pearl River and Mobile Basin drainages. Throughout its range, the frecklebelly madtom primarily occupies streams and rivers within the Gulf Coastal Plain province.  Learn more...

  • A small fish with tan and brown markings blending into the pebble substrate.
    Information icon Frecklebelly madtom. Photo by USFWS.

    Frecklebelly madtom proposed listing, 4(d) rule and critical habitat frequently asked questions

    November 17, 2020 | 7 minute read

    What is the frecklebelly madtom and where does it occur? The frecklebelly madtom is a small, stout catfish that inhabits the main channels and tributaries of medium to large river systems in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and Tennessee. The fish has a broad but scattered distribution across the Pearl River and Mobile Basin drainages. Throughout its range, the frecklebelly madtom primarily occupies streams and rivers within the Gulf Coastal Plain province.  Learn more...

News

  • A small fish with tan and brown markings blending into the pebble substrate.
    Information icon Frecklebelly madtom. Photo by USFWS.

    Service proposes to list population of frecklebelly madtom as threatened under Endangered Species Act

    November 17, 2020 | 4 minute read

    Following a review of the best available science, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to list a population of the frecklebelly madtom in the Upper Coosa River in Georgia and Tennessee as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The proposal, which would provide protections to this distinct population segment (DPS), also includes proposing critical habitat and a 4(d) rule for this population. The frecklebelly madtom is a small catfish that inhabits channels and tributaries of medium to large river systems in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and Tennessee.  Read the full story...

  • A small fish with tan and brown markings blending into the pebble substrate.
    Information icon Frecklebelly madtom. Photo by USFWS.

    Service proposes to list population of frecklebelly madtom as threatened under Endangered Species Act

    November 17, 2020 | 4 minute read

    Following a review of the best available science, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to list a population of the frecklebelly madtom in the Upper Coosa River in Georgia and Tennessee as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The proposal, which would provide protections to this distinct population segment (DPS), also includes proposing critical habitat and a 4(d) rule for this population. The frecklebelly madtom is a small catfish that inhabits channels and tributaries of medium to large river systems in Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and Tennessee.  Read the full story...

  • A woodpecker perched on a tree with a bug in its mouth
    Information icon A red-cockaded woodpecker has dinner outside its nesting cavity. Photo by USFWS.

    Service announces public hearing on proposed downlisting of red-cockaded woodpecker

    November 12, 2020 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will hold a public hearing on the proposed downlisting of the red-cockaded woodpecker. The virtual public hearing will be held on December 1, 2020 via Zoom and teleconference, in accordance with COVID-19 pandemic public gathering rules. Virtual meetings are also consistent with Service regulations at 50 CFR 424.16©(3). “The Service is committed to transparency in all of our science-based decisions and to the input of stakeholders and the public,” said Service Regional Director Leo Miranda.  Read the full story...

Warm-Springs-Fish-Technology-Center

  • A welcome sign that reads Warm Springs Regional Fisheries Center, National Fish Hatchery, Fish Health Lab, Fish Technology Center
    Information icon Welcome to the Warm Springs Regional Fisheries Center. Photo by USFWS.

    Warm Springs Fish Technology Center

    Although most hatchery lands and outdoor spaces have remained open for the public to enjoy, we encourage you to: Check local hatchery conditions on this website before visiting Follow current CDC safe practices by maintaining a safe distance between yourself and other groups Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth Cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze Most importantly, stay home if you feel sick Learn more about the U.  Learn more...

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