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Tag: Georgia Pigtoe

The content below has been tagged with the term “Georgia Pigtoe.”

News

  • Snail with a large orange and black shell.
    Interrupted rocksnail. Photo by Tom Tarpley, Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.

    Recovery plan for two endangered snails and an endangered mussel available

    November 6, 2014 | 4 minute read

    The interrupted rocksnail, rough hornsnail, and Georgia pigtoe mussel have disappeared from 90 percent or more of their historical ranges, primarily due to impoundment, or damming of riverine habitats. All three species are endemic to the Coosa River drainage of the Mobile River Basin in Alabama and Georgia. The Georgia pigtoe also occurs in a Coosa River tributary in Tennessee. “This final recovery plan provides direction the Service and its partners can take to recover these rare aquatic species,” said Cindy Dohner, the Service’s Southeast Regional Director.  Read the full story...

  • Snail with a large orange and black shell.
    Interrupted rocksnail

    Service announces the availability of a draft economic analysis for proposed designation of Critical Habitat for the Georgia pigtoe mussel, interrupted rocksnail, and roughhorn

    February 10, 2010 | 4 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced the availability of a draft economic analysis for the proposed designation of critical habitat for the Georgia pigtoe mussel, interrupted rocksnail, and rough hornsnail. These two aquatic snails and one mussel were proposed as endangered species, with critical habitat, on June 29, 2009. The public may submit written comments on this proposed listing, critical habitat designation and draft economic analysis by March 12, 2010.  Read the full story...

  • Snail with a large orange and black shell.
    Interrupted rocksnail

    Service proposes endangered species status and Critical Habitat designations for the Georgia pigtoe mussel, interrupted rocksnail, and rough hornsnail

    June 29, 2009 | 4 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today proposed listing the Georgia pigtoe mussel, interrupted rocksnail, and rough hornsnail as endangered species. These two aquatic snails and one mussel are considered indicators of stable, high-quality stream and river habitats. Their presence reflects the quality of the watersheds where they occur for a wide variety of other wildlife species, as well as for people. At the same time, the Service proposed designating parts of eight rivers and streams in Alabama, Georgia, and Tennessee, as critical habitat for the mussel and snails.  Read the full story...

Podcasts

  • Snail with a large orange and black shell.
    Interrupted rocksnail. Photo by Tom Tarpley, Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.

    Roadmap to recovery

    November 10, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The interrupted rocksnail, rough hornsnail, and Georgia pigtoe mussel are all endangered species, having disappeared from 90 percent or more of their historical ranges, largely due to the damming of rivers where they live. All three are native to the Coosa River drainage in Alabama and North Georgia, the Georgia pigtoe also occurring in east Tennessee. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recently came out with a road map for recovering these animals.  Learn more...

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