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Tag: Georgia Aster

The content below has been tagged with the term “Georgia Aster.”

Articles

  • Ten to twenty bright purple flowers emerge from thick vegetation.
    Information icon Georgia aster. Photo by Michele Elmore, The Nature Conservancy, Georgia.

    Organizations across South step up to keep plant off endangered species list

    May 16, 2014 | 4 minute read

    Atlanta, Georgia — The Georgia aster is an uncommon Southern plant that has been in decline for decades and on the verge of federal protection. However, today, numerous organizations, private and public, are stepping up to conserve the plant in an effort that should keep it off the endangered species list. The move comes as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, along with states and other federal agencies, advance a large, partnership-based effort to conserve at-risk plants and animals across the Southeast.  Learn more...

News

  • Ten to twenty bright purple flowers emerge from thick vegetation.
    Information icon Georgia aster. Photo by Michele Elmore, The Nature Conservancy, Georgia.

    Service releases 2014 list of candidates for Endangered Species Act protection

    December 5, 2014 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has released the Candidate Notice of Review, a yearly status appraisal of plants and animals that are candidates for Endangered Species Act (ESA) protection. Twenty-two species from Hawaii and one from Independent Samoa and American Samoa were added to the candidate list, one species was removed, and one has changed in priority from the last review conducted in November 2013. There are now 146 species recognized by the Service as candidates for ESA protection.  Read the full story...

  • Ten to twenty bright purple flowers emerge from thick vegetation.
    Information icon Georgia aster. Photo by Michele Elmore, The Nature Conservancy, Georgia.

    Conservation efforts help keep Georgia aster off Endangered Species List

    September 17, 2014 | 4 minute read

    Asheville, North Carolina – The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today announced that Georgia aster does not require federal protection under the Endangered Species Act, a decision reflecting years of conservation work by myriad partners. Georgia aster is a wide-ranging, but rare, purple-flowering plant found in the upper Piedmont and lower mountain regions of Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina. The plant has been a candidate for the federal endangered species list since 1999.  Read the full story...

  • Ten to twenty bright purple flowers emerge from thick vegetation.
    Information icon Georgia aster. Photo by Michele Elmore, The Nature Conservancy, Georgia.

    Partners to sign agreement to conserve rare plant

    May 14, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Georgia aster is an uncommon Southern plant that declined for decades, to the verge of receiving federal protection. However, nine organizations, private and public, are committing to conserve the plant in an effort that should keep it off the endangered species list. The commitment will be memorialized this Friday in an agreement called a Candidate Conservation Agreement, designed to proactively conserve plants and animals before they need Federal protection.  Read the full story...

Podcasts

  • Ten to twenty bright purple flowers emerge from thick vegetation.
    Information icon Georgia aster. Photo by Michele Elmore, The Nature Conservancy, Georgia.

    Georgia aster

    May 12, 2014 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Georgia aster is an uncommon plant that declined for decades, to the verge of receiving federal protection. However, this spring, numerous organizations, private and public, are stepping up to conserve the plant in an effort that should keep it off the endangered species list. The plant is found in the upper Piedmont and lower mountain regions of Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina.  Learn more...

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