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Tag: Freshwater Mussel

The content below has been tagged with the term “Freshwater Mussel.”

Articles

  • An outstretched hand holding a dozen mussels marked with id numbers
    Information icon Carolina heelsplitters ready to be stocked. Photo by FWS.

    Private landowners step up to save the Carolina Heelsplitter

    September 28, 2018 | 2 minute read

    Ellison McDow and his grandfather Donnie Evans displaying Carolina heelsplitters that will soon be released on Mr. Evan’s property. Photo by FWS. South Carolina, like many states in the Southeast Region, is mostly made up of private lands. Therefore, these lands and their owners are crucial to any effort aimed at recovery of endangered species. Last fall, a number of private entities voluntarily contributed to the ongoing recovery efforts for the critically endangered Carolina heelsplitter, a freshwater mussel.  Learn more...

  • A mussel with fringe around its opening partially burried in the sand on the river bottom.
    Information icon Appalachian elktoe in the Little River Translyvania County NC. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Endangered mussel making a comeback in the French Broad River

    March 22, 2018 | 5 minute read

    Asheville, North Carolina — In 1834, a freshwater mussel collected near the convergence of the Swannanoa and French Broad Rivers was recognized as a new species – the Appalachian elktoe. Eighty years later, Carnegie Museum curator and University of Pittsburg professor Arnold Ortman couldn’t find any elktoes in the French Broad River, attributing his failure to polluted water. Biologists search for Appalachian elktoes in the Mills River.  Learn more...

News

  • National Fish and Wildlife Foundation announces $940,000 in grants from Southeast Aquatics Fund

    December 11, 2018 | 6 minute read

    Washington, D.C. — The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) today announced $940,000 in grants to conserve and restore habitats for native freshwater aquatic species in focal watersheds within Alabama, Florida and Georgia. The grants will leverage $1.1 million in matching contributions, generating a total conservation impact of more than $2 million. “The Southeast is home to the greatest diversity of freshwater species in the country, many of which are becoming increasingly rare,” said Jeff Trandahl, executive director and CEO of NFWF.  Read the full story...

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