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Tag: French Broad River

The content below has been tagged with the term “French Broad River.”

Articles

  • A mussel with fringe around its opening partially burried in the sand on the river bottom.
    Information icon Appalachian elktoe in the Little River Translyvania County NC. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Endangered mussel making a comeback in the French Broad River

    March 22, 2018 | 5 minute read

    Asheville, North Carolina — In 1834, a freshwater mussel collected near the convergence of the Swannanoa and French Broad Rivers was recognized as a new species – the Appalachian elktoe. Eighty years later, Carnegie Museum curator and University of Pittsburg professor Arnold Ortman couldn’t find any elktoes in the French Broad River, attributing his failure to polluted water. Biologists search for Appalachian elktoes in the Mills River. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.  Learn more...

Podcasts

  • A hand holding two orange/black mussels with gold plates with an identifying number.
    Appalachian elktoe from the Cane River. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Appalachian elktoe conservation

    February 13, 2013 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. This year marks the 40th anniversary of the Endangered Species Act, and to celebrate, we’re taking a closer look at some of the endangered species found in the Southern Appalachians. In a building at a state fish hatchery in Marion, North Carolina are a series of tubs with an elaborate piping network leading in and out. Within these tubs the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission is working to rear some of North Carolina’s most endangered freshwater mussels in captivity, including the Appalachian elktoe mussel.  Learn more...
  • A dozen children check out small insects that were collected in the river.
    Students gathered around the macroinvertebrate table. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Haywood County kids hit the water

    January 5, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The headwaters of the Pigeon River are just off the Blue Ridge Parkway. The river flows northwest across North Carolina’s Haywood County, crossing into Tennessee before joining the French Broad River. The town of Canton, North Carolina straddles the river and is home to a paper mill that was the historical source of water quality problems that eliminated much of the life in the river for miles downstream - one of the most egregious examples of water pollution in the Southern Appalachians.  Learn more...
  • A trout fisherman holding a small grey trout with red spots.
    Fisherman holding an eastern brook trout. Photo by Chesapeake Bay Program, CC BY-NC 2.0.

    The trout economy of Western North Carolina

    October 23, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The North Mills River, in North Carolina’s Henderson County, is one of Western North Carolina’s most popular trout rivers. I took some time one Friday to enjoy the river and as I was getting ready to head home, I struck up a conversation with another man in the parking area who was arriving. The man was from Texas. His wife had come to the area on business, and when he saw you could trout fish here, he decided to tag along with her.  Learn more...
  • Two students wearing waders in a stream inspect a seine.
    Western North Carolina’s Pigeon River is home to the endangered Appalachian elktoe mussel. Photo by Gary Peeples.

    The Southeastern drought impedes efforts to recover the Pigeon River

    April 3, 2009 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The Pigeon River flows across North Carolina’s Haywood County and into Tennessee, where it joins the French Broad River. The river is infamous for the historical levels of pollution from the Champion Paper mill in Canton, North Carolina - pollution which eliminated a lot of life from the river. Although not yet to a point many people would like, the effluent from the mill, now Blue Ridge Paper, is a lot cleaner than it used to be and for several years the University of Tennessee has led a project to help restore some of the aquatic diversity to the Pigeon River.  Learn more...
  • A prehistoric looking fish with spines down its back and sides.
    Information icon Lake sturgeon. Photo by USFWS.

    New report looks at the state of American fish

    December 20, 2008 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. This week, we’ll look at the state of fish populations, both in the Southern Appalachians and across the nation. The slender chub is a tiny fish known only from the Clinch, Powell, and Holston Rivers of eastern Tennessee and southwest Virginia. It hasn’t been seen in the wild since 2002, despite searches by some of the best fish biologists in the region.  Learn more...
  • Sunset over waterbody.
    Information icon Night falls at Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Joy Campbell of Okefenokee Adventures.

    Toe River Valley River Trail

    November 30, 2008 | 3 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Today we’ll examine an effort to increase accessibility to one of the most beautiful corners of the Southern Appalachians. In Okefenokee Swamp National Wildlife refuge, there is little hiking, simply because there is little dry earth, however, visitors routinely traverse the refuge, camping in it’s backcountry and enjoying the alligators, turtles, and birds this southeast Georgia wilderness offers. Instead of being laced with hiking trails, the area is laced with paddling trails, with backcountry visitors paddling through the swamp from wooden camping platform to wooden camping platform.  Learn more...
  • A brown bird with purple wing tips floats on semi-frozen water.
    Female wood duck at Eufaula National Wildlife Refuge. Photo © Quincey Banks.

    Water Quality Woes in Western North Carolina

    November 9, 2008 | 3 minute read

    Transcript Good morning and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. This week, we’re going to look at the precarious situation of our Southern Appalachian rivers. When you have a child, certain sacrifices are made, some of which are temporary. Since our daughter’s birth more than two years ago, our canoe, which used to get frequent use, languished in the basement, getting used only as a convenient basement shelf.  Learn more...

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