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Tag: Florida

The content below has been tagged with the term “Florida.”

News

  • A biologist with a walking stick walks through dense wetland vegetation.
    Due to dense vegetation and an often muddy ground, traipsing through bogs can often be a challenge. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    $7 million in federal grants awarded to Native American tribes for wildlife conservation work

    April 20, 2009 | 11 minute read

    Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar today announced that 41 Native American tribes in 16 states will receive $7 million in competitive federal grants to undertake a wide variety of conservation projects. Funding is provided through the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Tribal Wildlife Grants program (TWG), which helps tribes defray the cost of implementing programs on their lands benefiting fish, wildlife, and their habitat. “Native American tribes manage nearly 100 million acres of land in the United States, land that provides important habitat for some of our nation’s most treasured species.  Read the full story...

  • A bright yellow bird with a downward curved beak perched on a tree branch.
    Maui parrotbill. Photo by Andrew Smith CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

    Interior Secretary Salazar announces award of $9 million in grants to states for imperiled species Conservation

    April 20, 2009 | 4 minute read

    Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar announced today the award of more than $9 million to 12 state wildlife agencies to help conserve and recover imperiled fish and wildlife species through the State Wildlife Grants (SWG) Competitive Program. The federal funding will be matched by more than $7 million in non-Federal funds provided by states and their partners for projects helping imperiled fish, wildlife and plant species. The SWG Competitive Program, part of the U.  Read the full story...

State

  • Sunrise photo with a deep blue to bright orange gradient and pine trees in the background
    Sunrise at Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge. Photo: Josh O’Connor, USFWS.

    Conservation in Florida

    Florida sunset. Photo: Paul Lang, USFWS. Florida is a state rich in a natural diversity of plants, animals and ecosystems. Encompassing nearly 66,000 square miles, this state is home to a tremendous diversity of species that live in varied land and water habitats. In the hardwood hammocks near Key West, you might see the endangered Stock Island tree snail. In the surf at Fernandina, you could find three species of sea turtles that we protect, and in the dunes at Perdido Key, you could spot the burrows of Perdido Key beach mice.  Learn more...

Wildlife

  • Fuzzy yellow and purple flowers emerging from a green grass-like stalk.
    Information icon American chaffseed © Robert Sincliar. Copyright release form S://EA/Photo Permissions/american-chaffseed.pdf

    American chaffseed

    American chaffseed is generally found in habitats described as open, moist pine flatwoods, fire-maintained savannas, and flowers from April to June in the South, and from June to mid-July in the North.  Visit the species profile...

  • Three brown birds swimming on still water
    Information icon American wigeon. Photo by Mike Wintroath, AGFC.

    American wigeon

    American wigeon are a medium-sized dabbling duck, and males have a distinctive white patch on their head that historically gave them the nickname “baldpate.” This species can be aggressive when competing for food and is a highly flexible forager, equally at home stealing food from diving ducks in deep water or grazing on turf grasses in urban areas. Conservation status Low concern. Range American wigeons occur across all four North American flyways, but they are most abundant in the Pacific and Central flyways.  Visit the species profile...

  • A brown and grey duck with a black belly standing at the entrance to a large birdhouse
    Information icon Black-bellied whistling duck. Photo by Stacey Hayden, USFWS.

    Black-bellied whistling duck

    The black-bellied whistling duck is sometimes described as part goose and part duck because of its rather peculiar physical features and behaviors. Like many goose species, black-bellied whistling ducks graze on grasses in upland areas, but they also nest in tree cavities similar to wood ducks. This species is highly gregarious, adaptable to using urban areas, and highly recognizable due to its pink bill and legs. Conservation Status Low concern.  Visit the species profile...

  • A small, black and white bird flies over ocean waters.
    Information icon Black-capped petrel off the coast of Cape Hatteras, NC. Photo © Brian Patteson, seabirding.com, used with permission.

    Black-capped petrel

    Taxon: Bird Range: Breeds on Hispaniola within the countries of Dominican Republic and Haiti; forages offshore in waters of the Atlantic off the coast of northern South America through North America as far north as Maine, occasionally further into Canada Status: Proposed for listing as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act The black-capped petrel is a seabird found in North America and the Caribbean, and is known by several common names: “black-capped petrel,” “capped petrel,” and “West Indian petrel” in North America and on English-speaking islands.  Visit the species profile...

  • Three brown birds with white spots on the edge of their wings standing in water
    Information icon Blue-winged teals. Photo by Clayton Ferrell, USFWS.

    Blue-winged teal

    Blue-winged teal are the second smallest duck in North America and are highly distinctive during flight due to their bright blue wing patch. Populations are highly responsive to wetland conditions in their breeding range; those years with many small temporary wetlands in the Prairie Pothole Region typically produce large hatches of this species. Conservation status Low concern. Related content Jul 14, 2014 | 2 minute read Podcasts Duck populations Range These long-distance migrants breed as far north as Alaska and throughout Canada, primarily nesting in the prairies of the central U.  Visit the species profile...

  • A rust colored bird preening in the water.
    Information icon Canvasback. Photo by Clayton Ferrell, USFWS.

    Canvasback

    Canvasback is the largest species of diving duck in North America and is highly recognizable due to the male’s stark white body, contrasting with a deep maroon head and neck. This species has been nicknamed “bull-neck,” and referred to as the aristocrat of ducks. Because of its diving feeding style, it spends most of its time using moderately deep-water marshes and lakes where it roots in the sediment searching for its favorite food, plant tubers from submersed aquatic vegetation.  Visit the species profile...

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

    Eastern black rail

    Black rails are the smallest rails in North America. One of four recognized subspecies of black rail, the eastern black rail is perhaps the most secretive. This small inhabitant of shallow salt and freshwater marshes is rarely seen and has a distinctive “kick-ee-doo” call that is often heard at night.  Visit the species profile...

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