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Tag: Florida

The content below has been tagged with the term “Florida.”

Infographic

  • Hurricane Irma

    This infographic shows the eye of Hurricane Irma and details the Southeast Region response. The Service sent out teams with fuel, water, food and chainsaws to make sure that employees were safe, to inspect homes and buildings, to clear roads and to find staging areas for equipment. Hurricane Irma impacted 45 national wildlife refuges, three national fish hatcheries, two ecological services field stations, two fish and wildlife conservation offices and three law enforcement offices in the Caribbean and Southeast U.  Learn more...

  • Hurricane Irma and sea turtles

    This infographic discusses the impact of hurricanes in Florida during sea turtle nesting season, and asks that you never touch any exposed eggs or disturbed nests. Although nearly 90 percent of sea turtle nesting in the United States occurs in Florida in March through October, a major hurricane there during this period doesn’t mean all is lost. Mother sea turtles “hedge their bets” by depositing eggs in several nests over the course of the season, so there is a high probability that at least a few of the nests will incubate successfully even if a serious storm hits.  Learn more...

Wildlife

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

    Eastern black rail

    Black rails are the smallest rails in North America. One of four recognized subspecies of black rail, the eastern black rail is perhaps the most secretive. This small inhabitant of shallow salt and freshwater marshes is rarely seen and has a distinctive “kick-ee-doo” call that is often heard at night.  Visit the species profile...

  • A Florida panther walking on a gravel road with a slash pine forest in the background
    A Florida panther. Photo by Larry W. Richardson, USFWS.

    Florida panther

    The Florida panther is a subspecies of Puma concolor (also known as mountain lion, cougar, or puma) and represents the only known breeding population of puma in the eastern United States. It is protected as endangered under the Endangered Species Act.  Visit the species profile...

  • Shot from above: a small bee that resembles a yellow jacket perched on a yellow flower with a sand beach below.
    Information icon Gulf Coast solitary bee. Photo by Center for Biological Diversity.

    Gulf Coast solitary bee

    The Gulf Coast solitary bee is a rare inhabitant of the sandy barrier islands and landward dunes along the Gulf of Mexico extending from Horn Island, Mississippi eastward to St. Andrew’s Bay in northwest Florida.  Visit the species profile...

  • A grey bird with yellow markings over its eye perched on a tall reed on the edge of a marsh
    Information icon MacGillivray’s seaside sparrow (Ammodramus maritimus macgillivraii), Georgetown County, South Carolina, April 2015; Photo by Yianni Laskaris, Coastal Carolina University.

    Macgillivray’s seaside sparrow

    One of seven remaining seaside sparrow subspecies, the MacGillivray’s seaside sparrow is known from the coastal marshes of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida.  Visit the species profile...

  • Male and female mallard ducks on a lake
    Information icon Mallards at Morris Wetland Management District in Minnesota. Photo by Alex Galt, USFWS.

    Mallard

    Taxon: Anseriformes, Anatidae Range: Mallards occur year-round throughout North America, but most individuals are migratory and breed in the northern United States and Canada and winter in the Southern United States and Mexico. Most of the breeding population occurs in the Prairie Pothole Region of the north-central United States and central Canada. Status: Not listed, low concern – In 2018, the breeding population size exceeded 10 million in the traditional and eastern survey areas of North America.  Visit the species profile...

  • An iridescent insect with many small hairs on its belly standing on leaf litter and sandy soil
    Miami tiger beetle. Photo by Jonathan Mays, Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission.

    Miami tiger beetle

    The Miami tiger beetle, found exclusively in pine rockland habitat in Miami-Dade County, Florida, has a shiny green exterior and protected under the Endangered Species Act as endangered.  Visit the species profile...

  • Eight northern pintails including two females and six males on a cold, winter lake
    Information icon Northern pintails at Tennessee National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Clayton Ferrell, USFWS.

    Northern pintail

    Taxon: Anseriformes, Anatidae Range: Northern pintail typically breed in the Prairie Pothole Region of the north-central United States, central Canada, and Alaska. They spend their winters in the southern United States and Mexico, especially along the Texas and Louisiana coasts of the Gulf of Mexico. Status: Not listed, low concern – More than 2.3 million northern pintail were estimated in the breeding population in 2018. However, substantial declines since the 1950s has resulted in restricted harvest regulations for this species.  Visit the species profile...

  • An adult wolf walking in an enclosure at the zoo.
    Information icon Captive red wolf at Species Survival Plan facility, Point Defiance Zoo and Aquarium (Tacoma, WA). Photo by B. Bartel, USFWS.

    Red wolf

    Once common throughout the Eastern and South Central United States, red wolf populations were decimated by the early 20th century as a result of intensive predator control programs and the degradation and alteration of the species’ habitat. When the red wolf was designated endangered in 1967, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service initiated efforts to conserve and recover the species.  Visit the species profile...

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