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Tag: Florida

The content below has been tagged with the term “Florida.”

Articles

  • Scaly brown sea turtles swimming in an aquarium
    Information icon Hawksbill turtles. Photo by Christopher Doemel, Creative Commons.

    Service, Customs Seize Illegal Turtle Shells in Miami

    August 20, 2020 | 1 minute read

    Law enforcement officials with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and U.S. Customs and Border Protection recently intercepted boxes and boxes of endangered sea turtle shells smuggled through the Miami International Airport. “It took probably 100 sea turtles to be killed to make this illegal shipment happen and that’s a very rough estimate,” said Aurelia Skipwith, the Service’s director. “Sea turtles are sometimes illegally killed for their shells, meat, eggs which have a commercial value on the black market.  Learn more...

  • Buckets of green, orange and yellow berries in large buckets and bags in the back of a pickup truck bed.
    Information icon Confiscated berries at Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Pamela Garrison, USFWS.

    Berry big business

    July 31, 2020 | 7 minute read

    Folkston, Georgia — The thieves, armed with machetes, travel in packs targeting unsuspecting communities with chilling precision. Sometimes, they’ll hit in the dead of night wearing headlamps as they slink deeper into the forest. Lookouts prowl the roadways alerting the criminals via phone or radio if the authorities approach. Then, with bags full of ill-gotten gains worth thousands of dollars, the bad guys abscond to the next ill-prepared community.  Learn more...

  • Hundreds of pelicans flying over a shoreline
    Information icon Brown Pelicans flying over St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Nicole Rankin, USFWS.

    Florida shorebird surveys underway thanks to creative staffing

    July 16, 2020 | 3 minute read

    Crystal-clear waters and white sandy beaches are two features you will find at St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses St. Vincent Island in the northwestern portion of the Florida Gulf coast. Besides being surrounded by pristine Outstanding Florida Waters, the barrier island refuge is also an important safe haven for at-risk species, including gopher tortoise, Florida red-bellied turtles, and black rail birds. It is an important stop-over point for neotropical migratory birds - birds that breed in North America but spend winters in Mexico, Central America, South America or the Caribbean islands.  Learn more...

  • More than a dozen volunteers planting shrubs on a sandy beach
    Information icon On Volunteer Day at Crocodile Lake National Wildlife Refuge, volunteers planted native torchwood and wild lime on a site that had recently been full of debris that could have hidden invasive pythons. Photo by Jeremy Dixon, USFWS.

    Coastal Program project helps Florida Keys refuge withstand possible python invasion

    July 10, 2020 | 3 minute read

    Invasive species surveillance and control is front and center for Crocodile Lake National Wildlife Refuge in the Florida Keys. Just a short 18 mile drive north is the Florida Everglades, where invasive pythons are wreaking havoc on the ecosystem, a situation that would have devastating effects on endangered Keys fauna if the species were to take hold. Indeed, several pythons (one measuring 16 feet long) have already been discovered in the refuge and removed.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A blackish/navy blue bird with bright red eyes and white markings on its wings
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo by Christy Hand, SCDNR.

    Eastern black rail - final 4(d) rule

    October 7, 2020 | 5 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), has broad authority to issue regulations for the conservation of threatened species. The ESA provides a specific list of prohibitions for endangered species under section 9, but does not automatically provide these same prohibitions to threatened species. Section 4(d) of the ESA allows the Service to establish prohibitions or exceptions to prohibitions for threatened species. The intent of any 4(d) rule is to provide for the conservation of a threatened species by allowing regulatory flexibility under the ESA.  Learn more...

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

    Eastern black rail final listing as a threatened species

    October 7, 2020 | 14 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is finalizing a rule to protect the eastern black rail, a small secretive marsh bird native to the United States, as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Partially migratory, the eastern black rail is historically known to exist in 35 states east of the Rocky Mountains, Puerto Rico, Canada, Brazil and several countries in the Caribbean and Central America.  Learn more...

  • A tiny, featherless bird on a blanket with small ankle bands
    Information icon Red-cockaded woodpecker photo by Lynda Richardson, Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries.

    Proposed downlisting of the red-cockaded woodpecker from endangered to threatened

    September 25, 2020 | 11 minute read

    Download the proposed rule to downlist the red-cockaded woodpecker from endangered to threatened with a section 4(d) rule. What is a red-cockaded woodpecker? The red-cockaded woodpecker is a territorial, non-migratory bird species of the southeastern and southern United States. It grows to about eight to nine inches long, about the size of the common cardinal, and has a wingspan of about 15 inches. The red-cockaded woodpecker’s most distinguishing feature is a black cap and nape that encircle large white cheek patches.  Learn more...

News

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.
    Information icon Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

    Service finalizes listing the eastern black rail as threatened under the Endangered Species Act

    October 7, 2020 | 4 minute read

    The eastern black rail, a small, secretive marsh bird historically known to exist in 35 states east of the Rocky Mountains, Puerto Rico, Canada, Brazil, and several countries in the Caribbean and Central America, will be listed as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The final listing includes a rule that will help ensure beneficial conservation actions continue, while minimizing impacts to landowners and other stakeholders. Critical habitat designation for the eastern black rail was deemed not prudent.  Read the full story...

  • A woodpecker perched on a tree with a bug in its mouth
    Information icon A red-cockaded woodpecker has dinner outside its nesting cavity. Photo by USFWS.

    Trump Administration proposes downlisting of red-cockaded woodpecker under Endangered Species Act

    September 25, 2020 | 13 minute read

    Fort Benning, Georgia — Secretary of the Interior David L. Bernhardt, Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue and Fort Benning Garrison Commander, Col. Matthew Scalia, were joined by public and private representatives today to celebrate the proposed downlisting of the red-cockaded woodpecker from endangered to threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). In the Southeast, no fewer than eight Army installations, four Air Force installations and one Marine Corps installation all made commitments to recovery goals for red-cockaded woodpeckers, which is a cardinal-sized bird, 8 to 9 inches in height with a sharp beak, living on land they manage.  Read the full story...

  • Service determines two Southeastern orchids do not warrant Endangered Species Act protections

    August 31, 2020 | 3 minute read

    Based on reviews of the best available science, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) has found that the Big Cypress epidendrum and Cape Sable orchid do not face the threat of extinction now or in the foreseeable future and do not warrant listing under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). New surveys and the latest science have determined that these orchids occur across Latin America and the West Indies in a variety of habitat types and elevations that will help ensure the species’ persistence into the future.  Read the full story...

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