skip to content

Tag: Florida

The content below has been tagged with the term “Florida.”

News

  • A manatee partially covered in algae looks directly into the camera surrounded by a school of fish.
    Manatee. Photo by S. Whitecraft, USFWS.

    Federal finding means Florida manatee critical habitat designation warrants revision

    January 12, 2010 | 3 minute read

    The Service announced today that revising critical habitat for the Florida manatee is needed, but the revision process is precluded by higher priority listing-related actions and funding constraints.  Read the full story...

  • Four young whooping cranes look for food on a muddy bank.
    Juvenile Whooping Cranes Forage on Wheeler NWR. Photo by Bill Gates, USFWS.

    Ultralight migration leads 20 endangered whooping cranes into Georgia

    January 7, 2010 | 6 minute read

    Twenty juvenile whooping cranes and several chilly pilots in ultralights reached Decatur County, Georgia, today on their ultralight-guided migration from Necedah National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in central Wisconsin to Chassahowitzka and St. Marks National Wildlife Refuges along Floridas Gulf Coast. “Successfully restoring a population of a migratory species is a huge challenge and this pioneering effort is demonstrating the need for long-term commitment,” said Mike Harris, Nongame Conservation Section chief with the Georgia Department of Natural Resources.  Read the full story...

  • A bright white lighthouse emerges over calm water and a mix of palm and oak trees.
    Lighthouse at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Steve Hillebrand, USFWS.

    Ultralight-led whooping cranes arrive at final wintering destination in Florida

    January 2, 2010 | 5 minute read

    Ten endangered whooping cranes arrived yesterday on their wintering grounds at the Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Citrus County, Florida. The other 10 “Class of 2009” ultralight-led cranes reached their final wintering destination at St. Marks NWR in Wakulla County, Florida on January 13. These 20 cranes are the ninth group to be guided by ultralight aircraft more than 1,200 miles from Necedah NWR in central Wisconsin to the Gulf coast of Florida.  Read the full story...

  • A Florida panther walking on a gravel road with a slash pine forest in the background
    A Florida panther. Photo by Larry W. Richardson, USFWS.

    Florida panther recovery plan, third revision available

    December 18, 2009 | 3 minute read

    The third revision of the Florida panther recovery plan is now available, announced the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today. The Florida panther is the last subspecies of Puma (also known as mountain lion, cougar, or catamount) still surviving in the Eastern United States. Historically occurring throughout the southeastern U.S., today the remaining approximately 100 panthers are found in south Florida and restricted to less than five percent of their historical range.  Read the full story...

  • Eight whooping cranes follow an ultralight fan powered glider in Kentucky.
    Ultralight in flight. Photo by Heather Ray, Operation Migration.

    Ultralight migration leads 20 endangered whooping cranes over the skies of Tennessee

    December 8, 2009 | 5 minute read

    Twenty juvenile whooping cranes reached Carroll County, Tennessee on December 5, 2009, on their ultralight-guided migration from Necedah National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in central Wisconsin to Chassahowitzka and St. Marks National Wildlife Refuges along Floridas Gulf Coast. To date, weather conditions have kept the migration from moving to the next stop in Hardin County. These majestic birds, the tallest in North America, left Necedah refuge on October 23, following Operation Migration’s four ultralight aircraft.  Read the full story...

  • Hundreds of brown pelicans cover a vegetated beach.
    Information icon Brown pelicans sitting on nests at Breton Island National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Greg Thompson, USFWS.

    Brown pelican populations recovered, removed from Endangered Species List

    November 11, 2009 | 4 minute read

    WASHINGTON, D.C. - Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar, Assistant Secretary for Fish and Wildlife and Parks Tom Strickland and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Sam Hamilton today announced that the brown pelican, a species once decimated by the pesticide DDT, has recovered and is being removed from the list of threatened and endangered species under the Endangered Species Act. “At a time when so many species of wildlife are threatened, we once in a while have an opportunity to celebrate an amazing success story,” Salazar said.  Read the full story...

  • Two large, white, Whooping cranes flying in for a landing on a small pond.
    Two juvenile Whooping cranes released from their holding pen fly around on Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge, Decatur, AL. Photo by Bill Gates, USFWS.

    Young whooping cranes will learn migration route from their elders

    October 26, 2009 | 5 minute read

    Nine young whooping cranes were released October 24 on central Wisconsin’s Necedah National Wildlife Refuge. The cranes are part of the Direct Autumn Release (DAR) project conducted by the Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership (WCEP), an international coalition of public and private groups that is reintroducing this highly imperiled species in eastern North America, part of its historical range. There are approximately 77 whooping cranes in the wild in eastern North America thanks to WCEP’s efforts.  Read the full story...

  • Long white birds flying in formation behind a fan powered glider.
    Information icon We hope for a tremendous viewing audience for this amazing spectacle! Photo by Nick Baldwin, a refuge volunteer from last years flyover.

    Ninth group of endangered whooping cranes depart on ultralight-guided flight to Florida

    October 22, 2009 | 5 minute read

    Twenty young whooping cranes have begun their ultralight-led migration from central Wisconsin’s Necedah National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). This is the ninth group of birds to take part in a landmark project led by the Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership (WCEP), an international coalition of public and private groups that is reintroducing this highly imperiled species in eastern North America, part of its historical range. There are now approximately 77 whooping cranes in the wild in eastern North America thanks to WCEP’s efforts.  Read the full story...

  • A white bird with angular wings and a dark head.
    Sooty Tern. Photo by Peter Kappes.

    Service releases climate change strategy for public review and comment

    September 23, 2009 | 6 minute read

    ATLANTA, GA — On coastal North Carolinas federal wildlife refuges, shorelines are receding and barrier islands are narrowing. In the Florida Keys, the sooty tern, a sea bird, is showing up to breed three to four months earlier than usual. Inland, invasive plants such as Alligator Weed are crowding out more desirable food for ducks and geese on refuges in Tennessee and northern Alabama. These signs, and many others, are consistent with the science on global warming.  Read the full story...

  • A white breasted bird with a brown head and grey feathers.
    Long-necked and slim, the Northern Pintail is a graceful, elegant bird. Photo by Dan Cox, USFWS.

    Secretary Salazar announces more than $41 million to purchase wetlands and fund grants for migratory waterfowl habitat more than $7 million in waterfowl habitat grants approved for southeastern states

    September 11, 2009 | 6 minute read

    Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar announced on September 9, 2009, the Migratory Bird Conservation Commission has approved the expenditure of nearly $8 million in Federal Duck Stamp funds to add more than 4,000 wetland acres to seven units of the National Wildlife Refuge System. The Commission also approved $33.4 million in federal funding to conserve more than 190,000 acres of wetlands and associated habitat in the United States under the North American Wetlands Conservation Act (NAWCA).  Read the full story...

Contact Us:

Looking for a media contact? Reach out to a regional spokesperson.

Share this page

Tweet this page on Twitter or follow @USFWSsoutheast

Share this page on Facebook or follow USFWSsoutheast.

LinkedIn

Share this page on LinkedIn