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Tag: Florida

The content below has been tagged with the term “Florida.”

Articles

  • A vine grows over a small pond covered in algae and fallen shrub branches
    Information icon Okeechobee gourd vines spreading across the landscape at restoration site. Photo by Rob Hopper, South Florida Water Management District.

    Okeechobee gourd thriving at Everglades restoration site

    January 23, 2020 | 3 minute read

    The endangered Okeechobee gourd got a new home and started the new year, and for that matter, the new decade with a bang. Previous efforts to successfully translocate the gourd and establish new populations were relatively unsuccessful, due to issues that included hydrology, predation, and invasive competition. However, in the summer of 2019, several locations within the Sam Jones/Abiaki Prairie Restoration site south of Lake Okeechobee were planted with the gourd, and today they are thriving.  Learn more...

  • Three young longleaf pine trees growing in a larger forest
    Information icon Young longleaf pine at The Jones Center, also known as Ichauway. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    Woodpecker swap meet

    January 13, 2020 | 9 minute read

    Tallahassee, Florida — Will McDearman stood on a chair, raised his voice and beseeched the hundred or so wildlife officials gathered in a nondescript auditorium to offer up every woodpecker they could find. “Are all the birds on the table?” he asked. Murmurs of assent followed. McDearman, like an auctioneer, then ended the bidding that joined woodpecker donor with woodpecker donee. “Going once,” he said. “Going twice,” he said.  Learn more...

  • Exploring my roots blossomed into helping others track their family histories

    November 14, 2019 | 3 minute read

    One of the great benefits of working for the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service is its belief in work-life balance, allowing employees to pursue our own interests outside the office and providing the flexibility to take the time off needed to pursue these interests. My interest is in genealogy.  Learn more...

  • A green and blue LiDAR image showing subtle differences in elevation caused by the presence of a historic factory
    Information icon An image captured by laser imagery depicts shell rings at Raleigh Island on the Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge in Florida. Ten centuries ago, the island was the site of a bead-making operation. Photo by Ken Sassaman, the University of Florida.

    A refuge gives up its secret

    November 12, 2019 | 4 minute read

    Today, it is the Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge, but long-ago it was a factory where natural resources became treasures. Native Americans transformed the shells of lightning whelks into products in demand far beyond the shores where they were made. Working in what is now western Florida, craftsmen turned those shells into beads. By the time Europeans arrived at those Gulf coast flatlands about 500 years ago, the bead-making operation had been operating for centuries.  Learn more...

  • A beautiful salt marsh with palm and oak trees in the distance partially obscuring a white lighthouse
    Information icon A marsh at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Orville Allen, CC BY 2.0.

    Want to hunt a refuge? Fish a hatchery?

    November 7, 2019 | 8 minute read

    St. Marks, Florida — The slash pine forest is thick and overgrown, impenetrable due to walls of saw palmetto, gallberry and fetterbush. A hunter this season would more likely get lost in there than bag a whitetail. Next season, though, will be different. Dan Frisk, project leader for the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge, stands by a deer stand used for the youth hunt each December on the refuge.  Learn more...

  • A man wearing a safety harness installs a large antenna on the roof of a school.
    Information icon The Motus tower is mounted on top of Vero Beach High School by electronics technician Steve Alfano. Photo courtesy of the School District of Indian River County.

    Canadian nighthawk is first bird detected by Vero Beach Motus tower

    November 6, 2019 | 2 minute read

    Approximately 25 days after it was captured and tagged, a common nighthawk migrating from Canada became the first bird detected by the Motus tower on top of Vero Beach High School on Aug. 29.  Learn more...

  • A green toad with dark spots in a biologist’s gloved hand
    Information icon Biologists at the Saratoga National Fish Hatchery in Wyoming hopped at the chance to raise the endangered Wyoming toad. Photo by USFWS.

    They’re growing what?

    November 6, 2019 | 9 minute read

    In Virginia and South Carolina hatcheries, biologists keep a close eye on shad and striped bass while taking time to focus on something that will never wear scales: mussels. And down in Florida, hatchery scientists charged with making sure rivers and streams are stocked with catfish and bass are singing the praises of a tiny bird they’re raising outside their labs. The Tishomingo National Fish Hatchery is growing alligator snapping turtles to boost that species’ population.  Learn more...

Faq

  • A brown mussel in a sandy river bottom
    Information icon Suwannee moccasinshell in its natural habitat. Photo by FWC.

    Suwannee moccasinshell Critical Habitat

    November 26, 2019 | 9 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is proposing to designate critical habitat for the Suwannee moccasinshell under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). What is the range of the Suwannee moccasinshell? The Suwannee moccasinshell, a small freshwater mussel, was historically present throughout much of the Suwannee River Basin; including the Suwannee River main stem in Florida, Santa River sub-basin in Florida, and the Withlacoochee River in Florida and Georgia.  Learn more...

News

  • A small, beige minnow-like fish with a dark stripe down its side
    Information icon Ozark chub. Photo by Dustin Lynch, Arkansas Natural Heritage Comission.

    Improved science and conservation partnerships mean a Southeastern fish and flowering plant do not need Endangered Species Act protections

    December 18, 2019 | 3 minute read

    Based on an extensive review of the best available science, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that the Ozark chub and the purpledisk honeycombhead do not face the threat of extinction now or in the foreseeable future. Protection of these species on conservation lands and new survey data helped inform the Service’s decisions not to list these species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). These not warranted findings are due in part to ESA-inspired partnerships between local, state and federal stakeholders, who collaborated to protect and conserve these species before they required federal protections.  Read the full story...

  • A brown mussel in a sandy river bottom
    Information icon Suwannee moccasinshell in its natural habitat. Photo by FWC.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes critical habitat for freshwater mussel in Georgia and Florida

    November 26, 2019 | 4 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today proposed critical habitat for the Suwannee moccasinshell, a freshwater mussel protected as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) since 2016. The Service is also making available a draft economic analysis that assesses the potential impact of the Suwannee moccasinshell’s critical habitat designation on various sectors of the economy. Members of the public are invited to comment on the proposal to help inform future conservation of this aquatic species and its habitat in southwest Georgia and northwest Florida.  Read the full story...

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