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Tag: Florida

The content below has been tagged with the term “Florida.”

Articles

  • A street sign that reads “Shade St” on a street denuded of all vegetation

    “The first people we’ve seen here since the hurricane”

    October 19, 2018 | 8 minute readPanama City, Florida — They didn’t have much time. Rose and Perry Lane fled just hours before Hurricane Michael bowled into Panama City. They took Mary Lane, 92, Perry’s mother. Simbo the cat sat in a carrier on her lap. The Lanes headed inland to an emergency shelter at a school where safety waited. Or so they thought. The fast-moving hurricane, trimming Panhandle pine forests like an immense lawn mower, got to the school not far behind the Lanes. Learn more...

    A street whose name no longer applies now that it’s nearly treeless. Service crews worked Thursday to remove fallen oaks from the yards of people on Shade Street in Panama City. Photo by Mark Davis, USFWS.

  • A drum-shapped buoy washed ashore with plam trees and a lighthouse in the distance

    Service makes headway in Hurricane Michael repairs

    October 17, 2018 | 5 minute readSt. Marks, Florida — The images of Hurricane Michael’s rampage across the Panhandle have been seared, by now, into the nation’s collective consciousness: the roofless homes; the mountains of debris; the long lines of anguished people; and the miles of chopped-in-half trees. The worst of the damage came courtesy of winds nearing 155 mph. Michael’s counter-clockwise punch, though, pushed water from the Gulf of Mexico deep inland, swamping small towns, barrier islands and wildlife refuges, particularly along Michael’s eastern edge. Learn more...

    A buoy washed ashore by Hurricane Michael at St. Marks NWR.

  • A fallen street sign blown over by high winds reads Mercedes Ave.

    The Battle for Mercedes Avenue

    October 14, 2018 | 6 minute readPanama City, Florida — The battle for Mercedes Avenue was joined. On one side stood an army of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service sawyers, swampers and heavy-equipment operators. On the other, a seemingly impenetrable forest of hurricane-downed pines and oaks blocking the street and keeping locals, utilities and ambulances from getting through. The Service’s sawyers readying to attack a tree. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS. Hurricane Michael had ripped across the Panhandle destroying houses, businesses and this city’s once-lovely tree canopy with equally reckless abandon. Learn more...

    Hurricane Michael bent the sign for Mercedes Ave. in half. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

  • A bowling alley with one wall and part of the roof blown off.

    Service task forces start assisting in Hurricane Michael recovery

    October 13, 2018 | 5 minute readPanama City, Florida – The sawyers and engineers, swampers and commanders arrived in the dark Thursday unable to fully grasp what Hurricane Michael had wrought. But there was no mistaking the devastation when the two-dozen U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service workers woke Friday in this Panhandle town no longer recognizable. Virtually every tree for miles was down or damaged. Roofs disappeared from homes and businesses along U.S. 98 only to be found a block away. Learn more...

    A bowling alley on US 98 in the wake of Hurricane Michael. Photo by Dan Chapman.

  • A volunteer removes weeds from a pollinator garden

    Friends, plants, and pollinators grow at Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge garden

    October 4, 2018 | 2 minute readInspired by the Service’s pollinator protection initiatives and a butterfly inventory in 2015, members of the Friends of the Florida Panther Refuge formed a committee to begin work on establishing a pollinator garden at Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge. With a new headquarters administrative office site and acres of yard space surrounded by natural habitat, the Friends recognized an opportunity to simultaneously beautify the space, engage volunteers, educate guests, and add beneficial native plants for local pollinators. Learn more...

    Two volunteers distribute mulch made from invasive Melaleuca trees across the expanded pollinator garden space. Photo by Jessica Sutt, USFWS.

  • A photo of the shore from the water with a bright white lighthouse, a large wooden dock and numerous palm and desiduous trees.

    The sea and the Key

    September 27, 2018 | 9 minute readEgmont Key, Florida — The history of this spit of an island is without parallel. Sadly, the Key itself could soon be history. Native Americans, for example, hunted the island at the mouth of Tampa Bay centuries ago. Spanish explorers mapped it in the 1500s. Billy Bowlegs and Polly Parker, Seminole Indian legends, were imprisoned here during the so-called Third Seminole War. Palms on the key’s western beach killed by the rising, salty gulf waters. Learn more...

    Egmont Key. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

  • A prescribed fire burns vegetation just outside of a housing development.

    Safe and sound burning

    September 10, 2018 | 9 minute readHobe Sound, Florida — The well-to-do on Jupiter Island wanted the wildlife refuge burned and who was to say no? Not the federal biologists at the refuge across the Intracoastal Waterway. They were eager to accommodate their neighbors and restore the pine scrub habitat. But the stakes — and potential dangers — were high. A prescribed fire, by its nature, is carefully planned and executed to minimize mishaps. Yet, winds shift. Learn more...

    Prime example of wildland urban interface on Sanibel Island, J.N. “Ding” Darling NWR. Photo by USFWS.

Faq

  • A small black bird flies over a lush green marsh

    Proposed listing for the eastern black rail

    October 5, 2018 | 12 minute readWhat action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is proposing to protect the eastern black rail, a small secretive marsh bird native to the United States, as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Partially migratory, the eastern black rail is known in as many as 36 states, plus multiple territories and countries in the Caribbean and Central and South America. It is one of four subspecies of black rail, which live in salt, brackish, and freshwater marshes. Learn more...

    Eastern black rail in flight – Texas, April 2016. Photo © Jesse Huth, used with permission, Huth Avian Services.

  • A small, black and white bird flies over ocean waters.

    Proposed listing of the black-capped petrel as threatened

    October 5, 2018 | 4 minute readWhat action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? The Service is proposing to list the black-capped petrel as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). What is the black-capped petrel? The black-capped petrel is a seabird that breeds on the Caribbean island of Hispaniola, home to Haiti and the Dominican Republic. It travels long distances to forage as far away as open ocean waters off the coast of Virginia. Learn more...

    Black-capped petrel off the coast of Cape Hatteras, NC. Photo © Brian Patteson, seabirding.com used with permission.

News

  • A small black bird with red eyes walks in the marsh grasses.

    Service proposes to list the eastern black rail as threatened under the Endangered Species Act

    October 5, 2018 | 5 minute readThe U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and its partners are working to protect a small, secretive marsh bird that is in steep decline. Some populations of the eastern black rail along the Atlantic coast have dropped by as much as 90 percent, and with a relatively small total population remaining across the eastern United States, the Service is proposing to list the subspecies as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Read the full story...

    Eastern black rail. Photo © Tom Johnson, used with permission, The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

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