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Tag: Florida

The content below has been tagged with the term “Florida.”

Articles

  • Over twenty African-American students and members of the Phi Beta Sigma fraternity posing for a photo.

    Like birds of a feather

    February 4, 2019 | 3 minute readWhile the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. may not, at first glance, seem to have much in common, the two organizations, like birds of a feather, have been flocking together to develop young men as well as conserve fish, wildlife, and their habitats. Phi Beta Sigma (Sigma) is a fraternal organization founded in 1914 that focuses on issues that impact African American communities. The fraternity has over 700 collegiate and alumni chapters across the country. Learn more...

    Members of the Phi Beta Sigma fraternity enjoy the outdoors at Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Phi Beta Sigma.

  • Three Service employees volunteering at a food bank with large packages of sweet potatoes

    Florida Service staff helps Food Bank distribute goods to families

    December 3, 2018 | 2 minute readOn Nov. 14, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service staff members volunteered to help the Treasure Coast Food Bank distribute food, toiletries, toys and other items to about 400 needy families in Fellsmere, Florida. This was done in conjunction with the food bank’s monthly mobile pantry distribution program, where they deliver and distribute donated goods to needy families in the communities where they live. Lindsay Nester (left) and Shana DiPalma prepare bags of toiletries. Learn more...

    Jennifer Gilchrist, John Tupy and Heather Hitt get bags of sweet potatoes ready for distribution. Photo by Ken Warren, USFWS.

  • Two large white birds flying low over a wetland coming in for a landing with a Service biologist in the foreground

    “Journey of the Whooping Crane” follows efforts to save a rare, endangered bird

    November 30, 2018 | 2 minute readIn 1940, only about 20 whooping cranes were known to exist. Today, thanks to the diligence of many partners working together in the United States and Canada, there are more than 850 cranes in North America and the population continues to increase slowly and steadily. The iconic bird is one of the success stories of the Endangered Species Act (ESA). But it remains one of the rarest animals in the world. Learn more...

    Two endangered whooping cranes coming in for a landing. Photo by Greg Pope.

  • A pine forest with trees snapped in half by high winds and a bent speed limit sign

    After Hurricane Michael

    November 29, 2018 | 6 minute readCamilla, Georgia — Hurricane Michael barreled across prime Southern timber territory, damaging five million acres of pines and hardwoods and destroying nearly $1.7 billion worth of marketable trees. Habitat for many of the region’s at-risk species — red-cockaded woodpeckers, gopher tortoises, eastern indigo snakes — was sundered. Red-cockaded woodpecker in flight. Photo by Martjan Lammertink, U.S. Forest Service. Now, six weeks after Michael killed more than 45 people in Florida, Georgia, North Carolina and Virginia, forest owners salvage timber, clear stands and pray for a market rebound. Learn more...

    Tyndall Air Force Base pine forests were scissored by Hurricane Michael. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

  • Biologist assess damage to a forest after a hurricane

    Test flight for red-cockaded woodpeckers

    November 21, 2018 | 3 minute readJoshua Havird lifted his quadcopter drone from its case as if he was handling a carton of eggs. The assistant fire management officer from St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge was on hand at the neighboring Apalachicola National Forest in the wake of Hurricane Michael. The Apalachicola, the only national forest on Florida’s panhandle and about 20 miles to the east of Mexico Beach, was hit hard on its western flank. Learn more...

    Joshua Havird (blue shirt) and Joel Casto (plaid shirt) assess RCW clusters. Photo by Michael Keys, USFS.

  • An american flag flies in the wind from its new home atop a Cold War era flagpole

    A Cold War flagpole, reclaimed

    November 14, 2018 | 4 minute readCrocodile Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Florida – In October, 1962, the United States and the Soviet Union brought the world as close it has ever come to the brink of nuclear war. The Cuban Missile Crisis was the most serious Cold War standoff between the two superpowers. Before it ended peacefully, a lot of people thought, with reason, that the end of the world could be at hand. When it was over, President John F. Learn more...

    A new flagpole at Crocodile Lake National Wildlife Refuge in the Florida Keys has a rich history. Photo by Morgan Barnes, USFWS.

News

  • A light orange salamander with a bright orange stripe

    Conservation partnerships help keep two birds, salamander and skink from requiring endangered species act protections

    December 18, 2018 | 4 minute readFollowing rigorous scientific reviews, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that, thanks in part to ongoing conservation partnerships, four southeastern animals do not face the threat of extinction now or in the foreseeable future. Accordingly, the MacGillivray’s seaside sparrow, Florida sandhill crane, striped newt and Cedar Key mole skink do not warrant Endangered Species Act (ESA) protection. “Our efforts working closely with diverse partners to proactively understand and address threats to wildlife is succeeding,” said Leo Miranda, the Service’s Southeast regional director. Read the full story...

    Juvenile striped newt. Photo by FWC.

  • National Fish and Wildlife Foundation announces $940,000 in grants from Southeast Aquatics Fund

    December 11, 2018 | 6 minute readWashington, D.C. — The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) today announced $940,000 in grants to conserve and restore habitats for native freshwater aquatic species in focal watersheds within Alabama, Florida and Georgia. The grants will leverage $1.1 million in matching contributions, generating a total conservation impact of more than $2 million. “The Southeast is home to the greatest diversity of freshwater species in the country, many of which are becoming increasingly rare,” said Jeff Trandahl, executive director and CEO of NFWF. Read the full story...

  • New regional director to head southeastern conservation efforts Fish and Wildlife Service

    December 10, 2018 | 2 minute readService officials announced late last month that Leopoldo “Leo” Miranda will head the Service’s Southeast Region. The tract encompasses 10 southeastern states as well as Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Read the full story...

  • A bird flies low over a pond for a landing.

    Hunting season opens with a bang on Merritt Island Refuge

    November 12, 2018 | 2 minute readThe general waterfowl hunting season has opened big at Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge in Titusville, Florida. More than a dozen vehicles started lining up more than 24 hours in advance for the opening on Saturday, November 17. By the time the refuge opened at 4 a.m. that morning, the line of vehicles stretched over the Max Brewer Bridge into Titusville. So far, 960 hunters have harvested 2,411 ducks over the first two weeks of the regular waterfowl season. Read the full story...

    Common merganser. Photo courtesy of Stan Bousson.

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