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Tag: Florida Panther

The content below has been tagged with the term “Florida Panther.”

Articles

  • An airboat operator sits back and watches the marsh burn.

    Fire as tool, and as friend

    August 24, 2018 | 8 minute readFire -- prescribed and carefully managed -- can be a wildlands’ best friend. Wildlife officials tout its ecological benefits. Hunters, fishermen and birders laud its cattail-clearing, nutrient-adding attributes. Hydrologists praise unimpeded water flows. Photo by USFWS. Learn more...

    Prescribed fire at Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge.

News

  • A brown and white bird with whiskers and a short, sharp beak.

    Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of 23 Southeastern species

    June 29, 2017 | 5 minute readAs part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of 22 endangered fish, wildlife, and plants, and one threatened species, the Ozark cavefish. These species are found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before August 29, 2017. These five-year reviews will ensure listing classifications under the ESA are accurate and recommend changes in status where appropriate based on the latest science and analysis. Read the full story...

    Endangered Puerto Rican nightjar. Photo by Mike Morel.

  • A Florida panther walking on a gravel road with a slash pine forest in the background

    Florida panther population estimate updated

    February 22, 2017 | 3 minute readThe U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) have updated the estimated number of endangered Florida panthers in their breeding range south of the Caloosahatchee River. The updated population estimate is 120 to 230 adult and subadult Florida panthers, according to a February 2017 report from the agencies collaborating on conservation and recovery efforts. The previous Florida panther population estimate was 100 to 180 adult and subadult panthers in 2014. Read the full story...

    A Florida panther. Photo by Larry W. Richardson, USFWS.

  • A dead florida panther laid out in the bed of a pickup truck.

    Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, partners offer reward for information about suspicious panther death

    December 19, 2013 | 2 minute readThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), National Park Service (NPS) and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) are looking for help from the public with an investigation involving the suspected illegal take of a Florida panther that was recently found dead in the Turner River Unit of Big Cypress National Preserve in Collier County. For information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person responsible for killing the panther, the FWC’s Wildlife Alert Reward Association and USFWS are offering a combined reward of up to $12,000. Read the full story...

    This Florida panther was killed in Troup County, GA on Nov. 16, 2008. Photo by Georgia DNR.

  • Photograph of female florida panther trailed by two cubs.

    Panthers in picayune kicking up their heels

    March 31, 2010 | 2 minute readA rare photograph taken earlier this month of a Florida panther and her two kittens is making the e-mail rounds among wildlife biologists and conservation partners who have toiled for decades to restore the big cat’s habitat. The photo, taken from an airplane above Picayune Strand near Naples, captures the trailing kitten mid-leap, as if euphorically kicking up her heels in delight. For those who have witnessed the shrinking of the panther’s historical range – now down to five percent of its original size – the snapshot is as sweet as January’s high-profile visit from Washington VIPs for a groundbreaking ceremony at the Strand. Read the full story...

    Panther #170 and kittens walking in the northeastern portion on Picayune Strand Restoration Project on March 1, 2010. By Darrell Land, Panther Team Leader, FWC.

  • A Florida panther walking on a gravel road with a slash pine forest in the background

    Florida panther recovery plan, third revision available

    December 18, 2009 | 3 minute readThe third revision of the Florida panther recovery plan is now available, announced the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today. The Florida panther is the last subspecies of Puma (also known as mountain lion, cougar, or catamount) still surviving in the Eastern United States. Historically occurring throughout the southeastern U.S., today the remaining approximately 100 panthers are found in south Florida and restricted to less than five percent of their historical range. Read the full story...

    A Florida panther. Photo by Larry W. Richardson, USFWS.

  • A dead florida panther laid out in the bed of a pickup truck.

    Troup county panther was a Florida panther -- wildlife CSI: high-tech genetic testing used to determine cat’s parentage

    August 5, 2009 | 2 minute readSOCIAL CIRCLE, GA – Genetic testing by the National Cancer Institute, Laboratory of Genomic Diversity, has indicated that the panther shot by a hunter in Troup County last year came from the resident southern Florida panther population. On Sunday, November 16, 2008, a hunter observed a mature panther or cougar while he was hunting deer in the woods of Troup County. The hunter observed the cat from his stand and shot it, according to the Georgia Department of Natural Resources (GDNR). Read the full story...

    Florida panther killed by David Adams in Troup County, GA on Nov. 16, 2008. Photo by Georgia DNR.

Wildlife

  • A Florida panther walking on a gravel road with a slash pine forest in the background

    Florida panther

    The Florida panther is a subspecies of Puma concolor (also known as mountain lion, cougar, or puma) and represents the only known breeding population of puma in the eastern United States. It is protected as endangered under the Endangered Species Act. Visit the species profile...

    A Florida panther. Photo by Larry W. Richardson, USFWS.

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