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Tag: Florida Keys National Wildlife Refuges Complex

The content below has been tagged with the term “Florida Keys National Wildlife Refuges Complex.”

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  • Two small deer walking across a street.

    Florida Keys national wildlife refuges visitor center re-opens with modified hours due to Hurricane Irma

    November 29, 2017 | 2 minute readThe Florida Keys National Wildlife Refuges Complex Visitor Center located at 179 Key Deer Blvd. in the Big Pine Key shopping plaza has now re-opened with modified hours and days on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Saturdays from 10 am- 3 pm. This Visitor Center serves the National Key Deer Refuge, Crocodile Lake NWR, Great White Heron NWR and Key West NWR. Residents and visitors are welcome to come on in, say hello and take advantages of the opportunities offered. Read the full story...

    Pair of Key deer. Photo by Bree McGhee, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

  • A small deer in the trunk of a car.

    Defendants sentenced for illegal take of endangered Key deer

    November 1, 2017 | 3 minute readTwo South Florida residents, who captured and restrained three Florida Key deer on Big Pine Key, were sentenced Oct. 31, 2017, in federal court in Key West for violations of the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Erik Damas Acosta, 18, of Miami Gardens, and Tumani A. Younge, 23, of Tamarac, previously pled guilty for their involvement in the July 2, 2017 incident in Monroe County, Florida. United States District Court Judge Jose E. Read the full story...

    One of three Key deer found in the car of two South Florida residents. Photo by USFWS.

  • A hand painted sign on plywood welcoming residents back to the Keys

    Florida Keys National Wildlife Refuges Complex phased re-opening

    October 30, 2017 | 3 minute readOn September 5, 2017, The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service closed all facilities and trails and cancelled all planned programs in the Crocodile Lake National Wildlife Refuge on Key Largo, the National Key Deer Refuge on Big Pine Key and the Key West and Great White Heron National Wildlife Refuges in the lower Keys as a result of Hurricane Irma. Like our neighbors, the Refuges and Refuge infrastructure sustained the whole spectrum of hurricane damage ranging from cosmetic to total destruction. Read the full story...

    Welcoming residents home to the Keys. Photo by USFWS.

  • A deer similar in appearance to a white-tailed deer, but much smaller in size

    New survey shows Hurricane Irma had little impact on Key deer population

    October 23, 2017 | 3 minute readA new U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service survey has found that Hurricane Irma killed some of Florida’s endangered Key deer, but that the overall population remains healthy. Prior to Irma, the Service estimated approximately 1,100 deer roamed their core habitats on Big Pine Key and No Name Key. After Irma, Service staff estimated the population at 949 Key deer in the same areas. “We are happy to report Key deer numbers are well within the range we observed before Irma,” said National Key Deer Refuge manager Daniel Clark. Read the full story...

    A Key deer on Big Pine Key in Florida. Photo by Garry Tucker, USFWS.

  • A small deer with velvet covered antlers in a recently burned forest.

    First, do no harm: keeping wildlife wild and healthy

    October 10, 2017 | 3 minute readVero Beach, Florida – The old doctors’ adage “First, do no harm” also applies to wildlife, in this case Key deer. Legitimately trying to help in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma, well-meaning people have been providing a variety of food products (corn, dog/cat food, etc.) for Key deer and other wildlife. But feeding them could do more harm than good. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) strongly urges the public not to feed wildlife, particularly Key deer. Read the full story...

    A Key deer in velvet. Photo by USFWS.

  • A small deer with two small emerging antlers lays on a slab of concrete while taking a drink of water from plastic tupperware.

    Thirsty Key deer get a helping hand from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the public

    September 22, 2017 | 6 minute readBig Pine Key, Florida – Key deer, the lovably docile and locally iconic herbivores that meander across the piney marshlands and in-town streets of the Lower Keys, were hit hard by Hurricane Irma. Some survivors seem listless and dehydrated a week after Irma wracked this hard-hit island, home to National Key Deer Refuge. The storm’s surge – 4 feet high in places – inundated freshwater drinking holes turning them salty and unpalatable. Read the full story...

    A dehydrated Key deer drinks water provided by USFWS at National Key Deer Refuge. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

  • An USFWS employee in uniform looks at a small screen to register the salinity level of a small pond.

    Community assistance opportunity to help Florida Keys wildlife

    September 20, 2017 | 3 minute readThe U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) completed surveys of areas known to provide fresh water to wildlife in the National Key Deer Refuge (No Name and Big Pine Keys west to Sugarloaf Key) following Hurricane Irma. Due to the storm surge from Hurricane Irma, salinity levels in fresh water wetlands are on average higher than acceptable levels for most wildlife species, including the endangered Key deer, resident and migratory birds, rabbits, butterflies, and other species. Read the full story...

    Chris Eggleston, project leader at the Southwest Louisiana NWR Complex tests salinity levels on the National Key Deer Refuge. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

  • An 18-wheeler used for emergency response.

    Knocking on doors, saving lives

    September 15, 2017 | 2 minute readBig Pine Key, Florida – Hurricane Irma killed eight people in the Florida Keys. Sami Gray, newly arrived and in charge, did her part to make sure there wouldn’t be a 9th body found, not on her watch. Gray, the incident commander for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service response to the hurricane asked law-enforcement officers to undertake another round of “wellness checks” Thursday afternoon in and around the National Key Deer Refuge. Read the full story...

    North Mississippi Task Force responds to Hurricane Irma. Photo by USFWS.

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