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Tag: Florida Grasshopper Sparrow

The content below has been tagged with the term “Florida Grasshopper Sparrow.”

Articles

  • A green toad with dark spots in a biologist’s gloved hand
    Information icon Biologists at the Saratoga National Fish Hatchery in Wyoming hopped at the chance to raise the endangered Wyoming toad. Photo by USFWS.

    They’re growing what?

    November 5, 2019 | 9 minute read

    In Virginia and South Carolina hatcheries, biologists keep a close eye on shad and striped bass while taking time to focus on something that will never wear scales: mussels. And down in Florida, hatchery scientists charged with making sure rivers and streams are stocked with catfish and bass are singing the praises of a tiny bird they’re raising outside their labs. The Tishomingo National Fish Hatchery is growing alligator snapping turtles to boost that species’ population.  Learn more...

News

  • A green plant with serrated edges and a brown stem with a cylindrical orange flower.
    Information icon *Gesneria pauciflora* (no common name). Photo by Jan Paul Zegarra, USFWS.

    Service announces recovery plan revisions for 53 species, to assist in measuring progress and addressing threats

    August 5, 2019 | 5 minute read

    As part of an agency-wide effort to advance the recovery of our nation’s most imperiled species, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has made publicly available draft revisions for 28 Endangered Species Act (ESA) recovery plans that provide a recovery roadmap for 53 federally protected species. This batch of recovery plan revisions is part of the Department of the Interior’s Agency Priority Performance Goals, which call for all recovery plans to include quantitative criteria on what constitutes recovery, by September 2019.  Read the full story...

  • Bright red flowers emerge from a bog with a forest in the background.
    Information icon Mountain sweet pitcher plant patch in Butt CPA. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducts five-year status reviews of 53 Southeastern species

    June 20, 2019 | 9 minute read

    As part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of 53 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife, and plants. These species are found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before August, 19, 2019. These five-year reviews will ensure listing classifications under the ESA are accurate and recommend changes in status where appropriate based on the latest science and analysis.  Read the full story...

  • A man in a green shirt kneels down into tall grass to release a long black snake.
    Information icon David Printiss of TNC releases an eastern indigo snake into a gopher tortoise burrow during a 2018 release. Photo by Tim Donovan, FWC.

    Good news for America’s longest snake! 15 eastern indigo snakes just released in year three of the North Florida recovery effort

    June 11, 2019 | 8 minute read

    Tallahassee, Florida — Fifteen eastern indigo snakes, listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, have just been released in northern Florida as part of a continuing collaborative plan to return the important, native, non-venomous apex predator to the region. This effort marks the third year in a row that snakes raised specifically for recovery of the species have been released at The Nature Conservancy’s Apalachicola Bluffs and Ravines Preserve (ABRP) in Bristol.  Read the full story...

  • Small bird with brown and white feathering. Yellow feathering on its head.
    Information icon Florida grasshopper sparrow and chicks. Photo by rarespecies.org.

    Foundation awards $35,000 for Florida grasshopper sparrow survival

    April 10, 2019 | 2 minute read

    Tallahassee, Florida — The nonprofit Fish & Wildlife Foundation of Florida (FWFF) has announced a $35,000 gift to White Oak Conservation to help ensure the Florida grasshopper sparrow’s survival. This grant follows a similar $10,000 gift made in February. The Florida grasshopper sparrow is North America’s most endangered bird. Fewer than 50 breeding pairs are left in the wild. To save this imperiled ground-nesting bird, federal and state agencies and an array of private conservation groups are using a multi-pronged strategy that includes protecting nests from predators and flooding, improving habitat via prescribed burns, and conducting research.  Read the full story...

  • Small bird with brown and white feathering. Yellow feathering on its head.
    Information icon Florida grasshopper sparrow and chicks. Photo by rarespecies.org.

    First captive-bred Florida grasshopper sparrow chicks hatched

    May 11, 2016 | 4 minute read

    Vero Beach, Florida - Conservation history was made May 9 when the first captive-bred Florida grasshopper sparrow chicks hatched at the Rare Species Conservatory Foundation (RSCF) in Loxahatchee, Florida – a major breakthrough for one of North America’s most endangered birds. “This bird is teetering on the brink of extinction. There are probably less than 150 left. We’re working with our partners – including the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) – to save it.  Read the full story...

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