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Tag: Fishing

The content below has been tagged with the term “Fishing.”

Articles

  • Water cascades about a dozen feet down the dam, which stretches 100 yards across the Green River. A sunny day, with flowers in the shot, and the river is rocky.
    Information icon Water cascades about a dozen feet down the dam, which stretches 100 yards across the Green River. Photo by Mark Davis.

    Going, going…

    July 1, 2021 | 4 minute read

    Woodbury, Kentucky – Federal, state and local environmentalists are preparing to do what more than a century of rushing water has not achieved: Demolish a lock and dam. It will change a stretch of the Green River forever. Officials from practically every level of government gathered Monday, June 28, to take a last look at lock and dam No. 5, a half-hour drive from Bowling Green. The dam, 100 yards across, and the lock, which is 120 yards long, are the latest Green River structures whose days are numbered.  Learn more...

  • A flock of geese flying over a pond full of white swans
    Information icon Wildlife management areas, such as North Carolina's Texas Plantation, have benefited from a decades-old federal funding plan. The state acquired the 1,467-acre tract with $1.38 million in federal restoration funds. It matched that amount with $462,500 from the sale of hunting and fishing licenses. Photo by NCWRC.

    Money well-spent

    July 8, 2020 | 6 minute read

    The evidence is there, in long rows of numbers and words that detail where the land was purchased, and when, and — most important — how much. But numbers and words don’t explain how a lake sparkles beneath a rising sun. They cannot convey the scent of pine needles, the rapid-fire hammering of a woodpecker. The sums cannot add to the thrill of seeing a mama bear and her cubs stick inquisitive noses into a forest clearing.  Learn more...

  • An aerial photograph of a river cutting through a marsh emptying into a the Gulf of Mexico.
    Information icon A View South over Grand Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve, Grand Bay, MS. Photo by USFWS.

    Gulf of Mexico Restoration Benefits Wetlands and Recreation

    June 24, 2020 | 5 minute read

    As we transition from American Wetlands Month through National Great Outdoors Month, it is the perfect time to showcase the restoration progress we continue to make in the Gulf of Mexico region. The Deepwater Horizon explosion occurred 10 years ago this spring and we’ve read many stories about the explosion and the sad impact the spill has had on wildlife and habitat. Oil fouled more than 1,300 miles of shoreline from Texas to Florida.  Learn more...

  • A lone pine tree stands tall on a narrow peninsula along a bay
    Information icon Weeks Bay marsh, Alabama. Photo by Weeks Bay NERR.

    Gateway to Weeks Bay conserved for future generations

    June 2, 2020 | 3 minute read

    Whether gliding through the mouth of Weeks Bay by motor or paddle craft, the first strip of land that catches a voyager’s eye is the East Gateway Tract. The tract is roughly 175 acres of critically important and diverse land that includes micro-dune habitat, tidal streams, marshland, and forested wetlands. The water surrounding East Gateway is a prime fishing location with a prevalence of redfish and speckled trout, which is not to be outdone by the bird watching opportunities on the tract, as it provides wonderful habitat for migratory birds.  Learn more...

  • A greenish brown fish with dark brown spots along its side
    Information icon Brown trout. Photo by USFWS.

    Staying indoors leads to getting outdoors

    May 12, 2020 | 5 minute read

    Maybe you’re still sheltering in place, working from home, unable to go to the gym or church. What do you do? Go fishing. Millions of Americans are doing just that — in eye-popping numbers. Cooped up, and without their usual recreational outlets, anglers have taken mightily to the mountain streams, reservoir lakes and coastal waters across the South. The U.S. Department of the Interior’s decision two years ago to expand hunting and fishing opportunities at the nation’s wildlife refuges and fish hatcheries seems particularly fortuitous.  Learn more...

National-Wildlife-Refuges

  • A refuge law enforcement officer in uniform shows a child how to cast a rod.
    Zone Officer Butler teaching Cub Scouts how to fish at a summer camp in Brunswick, GA. Photo by USFWS.

    Fishing on Southeastern Refuges

    In addition to the conservation of wildlife and habitat, many national wildlife refuges offer a wide variety of quality fishing opportunities. Every year, about 7 million anglers visit national wildlife refuges, where they can find knowledgeable staff and thousands of volunteers.  Learn more...

News

  • Wooden pier, about 3 feet wide with armrails, extends out into a calm lake. Three trees surround pier.
    Information icon Lanke and pier at Bickham Dickson Park. Photo by Terri Jacobson, USFWS.

    Red River National Wildlife Refuge are new land managers of Bickham Dickson Park in Shreveport

    December 2, 2020 | 3 minute read

    Autumn cypress tree at Bickham Dickson Lake. Photo by Terri Jacobson, USFWS In partnership with the City of Shreveport the federal government has taken over operation and management of C. Bickham Dickson Park (Park), which now becomes part of the Red River National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). In 2019 the Shreveport City Council agreed to a 99-year lease of the Park to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.  Read the full story...

  • Secretary Bernhardt announces historic expansion of hunting and fishing opportunities on public lands

    August 18, 2020 | 17 minute read

    Saginaw, Michigan – Continuing the Trump Administration’s unprecedented efforts to increase recreational access on public lands, U.S. Secretary of the Interior David L. Bernhardt announced today at the Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge the historic opening and expansion of over 850 hunting and fishing opportunities across more than 2.3 million acres at 147 national wildlife refuges and national fish hatcheries. This rule is the single largest expansion of hunting and fishing opportunities by the U.  Read the full story...

  • An older man points to the sky with a child.
    Information icon Hunting. Photo by USFWS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes more opportunities to hunt, fish across South Atlantic, Gulf and Mississippi Basin

    April 27, 2020 | 5 minute read

    Atlanta, Georgia — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes to expand hunting and fishing opportunities on another 500,000 acres of national wildlife refuge lands across the South. If approved, the new regulations will take effect this fall. In all, 22 refuges will offer more than 110 new or expanded hunting and fishing opportunities — new species to hunt, more acres to hunt and more times to hunt. “We continue to build upon our recent successes to expand our recreational offerings,” said Leo Miranda, an avid hunter and regional director for the South Atlantic-Gulf & Mississippi Basin.  Read the full story...

Wolf-Creek

  • A sign for the visitor and environmental education center.
    Information icon Welcome to Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery. Photo by Robert H Pos, USFWS.

    Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery

    Although most hatchery lands and outdoor spaces have remained open for the public to enjoy, we ask that you Recreate Responsibly. Check local conditions on this website and call ahead for current information. Operations vary based on local public health conditions. Consistent with CDC recommendations, people who are not fully vaccinated must continue to wear masks indoors and in crowded outdoor spaces. Most importantly, stay home if you feel sick and continue to watch for symptoms of COVID-19 and follow CDC guidance on how to protect yourself and others.  Learn more...

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