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Tag: Fish

The content below has been tagged with the term “Fish.”

Faq

  • A bright green irrodescent fish in a small blue net.
    Information icon Barrens topminnow. Photo by Emily Granstaff, USFWS.

    Proposed listing of the Barrens topminnow

    January 3, 2018 | 7 minute read

    What action is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service taking? We are proposing to list the Barrens topminnow as an endangered species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). What does it mean when a species is listed as endangered? A species is listed in one of two categories: endangered or threatened. An endangered species is one that is in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant portion of its range.  Learn more...

  • A small, brightly colored orange and blue fish in an aquarium.
    Information icon Photo by J.R. Shute, Conservation Fisheries, Inc.

    Final listing - threatened status for the Kentucky arrow darter and designation of critical habitat

    October 4, 2016 | 13 minute read

    Frequently asked questions about the final listing of the Kentucky arrow darter as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act.  Learn more...

News

  • A small, straw-yellow colored fish with brown markings
    Information icon Photo by Jeremy Shute, Conservation Fisheries, Inc.

    Cumberland darter draft recovery plan available for review

    April 2, 2018 | 3 minute read

    The Cumberland darter is a pencil-sized fish that lives in the Upper Cumberland River Basin in Kentucky and Tennessee. It is endangered and protected under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is releasing a draft recovery plan for the fish. The public is invited to submit comments concerning the draft recovery plan through June 4, 2018. The Cumberland darter lives in pools and shallow runs of streams with sand-covered river bottoms in that basin.  Read the full story...

  • A bright green irrodescent fish in a small blue net.
    Information icon Barrens topminnow. Photo by Emily Granstaff, USFWS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes endangered status for Barrens topminnow

    January 3, 2018 | 4 minute read

    The Barrens Plateau is home to a beautiful, iridescent fish that rarely grows longer than four inches and is found in only a few creeks and springs in four Tennessee counties. That little fish is now in trouble, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to help protect it as an endangered species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The Barrens topminnow has suffered from introduction of the non-native western mosquitofish, which has invaded the minnow’s habitat, outcompeting it for food and directly preying on young topminnows.  Read the full story...

  • A greyish green fish with a long body and blueish grey fins.
    Information icon Bridled darter. Photo by Noel Burkhead, United States Geological Survey.

    Endangered Species Act protection not needed for two Coosa darters

    October 3, 2017 | 2 minute read

    After a scientifically rigorous process, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) has concluded instead that the holiday darter and bridled darter populations are stable, being conserved through existing regulations, and do not need protection. The holiday darter is a small freshwater fish found in small creeks to moderate-sized rivers above the fall line in the Ridge and Valley, Blue Ridge, and Piedmont provinces of Alabama, Georgia and Tennessee. The Service reviewed seven populations for the holiday darter, and all seven populations still exist within the current range.  Read the full story...

Wildlife

  • A bright green irrodescent fish in a small blue net.
    Information icon Barrens topminnows are small, colorful fish that live only in a few springs and creeks in central Tennessee. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed listing the fish as endangered. Photo by Emily Granstaff, USFWS.

    Barrens topminnow

    The Barrens topminnow is a small colorful fish that grows to almost four inches long. It has an upturned mouth with a flattened head and back. Fins are rounded with the unpaired fins set far back on the body.  Visit the species profile...

  • A small fish with dark stripes on a yellow tinged back and white belly.
    Information icon Blackfin sucker. Photo by Matthew Thomas, KDFWR.

    Blackfin sucker

    A small fish averaging about five and a half inches in length, the blackfin sucker has a body patterned with two dark, brownish-black horizontal lines below the lateral line (a faint line of sense organs extending from the gill cover to the tail) and six or seven additional lines in the back and the side of the body, with intervening olive-gold stripes.  Visit the species profile...

  • A colorful green/brown and red trout covered in small red spots.
    Information icon A wildlife biologist holds a small eastern brook trout. Photo by Steve Droter, Chesapeake Bay Program.

    Brook trout

    The brook trout is a fish native to the eastern United States, and is often referred to as speckled trout, spotted trout, brookie, and squaretail. “Brookies” are considered an indicator species, because they help indicate the health or overall quality of the waters they inhabit.  Visit the species profile...

  • Brown trout

    Taxon: Freshwater fish Range: Native to Europe; introduced to North America in 1883. Status: Not listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) Brown trout are a coldwater species like most fish of the salmon family. The first brown trout eggs were imported to the U.S. from Germany in 1883. In 1884, the release of 4,900 brown-trout fry into Michigan’s Baldwin River represented the first time the species swam free in U.  Visit the species profile...

  • About a dozen small fish in a container ready for release
    Information icon Cape Fear shiners. Photo by NCWRC.

    Cape Fear shiner

    The Cape Fear shiner is a freshwater fish in the minnow family found in the central part of North Carolina, in the Upper Cape Fear River Basin.  Visit the species profile...

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