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Tag: Fish

The content below has been tagged with the term “Fish.”

Faq

  • A small brown and yellow speckled fish in a biologists hand.
    Information icon Snail darter. Photo by USFWS.

    Proposed Delisting of Snail Darter Due to Recovery Frequently Asked Questions

    August 31, 2021 | 4 minute read

    What is the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposing? The Service is proposing to remove the snail darter from the Endangered Species Act (ESA) due to recovery. What is a snail darter? Snail darters are small fish that grow to 2 ½ to 3 ½ inches long. They eat insects and mostly snails, hence their name. They are found in rivers and streams in Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi and Tennessee.  Learn more...

  • A small fish with a tan underbelly and brown markings.
    Information icon Pearl darter. Photo credit USFWS.

    Proposed Critical Habitat for the Pearl Darter in Mississippi: Frequently Asked Questions

    July 12, 2021 | 7 minute read

    What is the pearl darter? The pearl darter (Percina aurora) is a small (2 to 2.5 inches long) snub-nosed fish found in pools or deep runs of flowing streams and rivers. It is a bottom dwelling species generally found over sand, gravel, or bedrock in slow to moderate currents. Where does it occur?  Native to the Pascagoula River system of Mississippi and the Pearl River system of Mississippi and Louisiana, pearl darters continue to survive in the Pascagoula River system but have not been seen in the Pearl River system for more than 40 years.  Learn more...

  • A small fish with swimming above rocky substrate. Fish is striped tail to snout brown, black and white.
    Information icon Sickle darter; Photo by Crystal Ruble, Conservation Fisheries, Inc.

    Proposed listing for the sickle darter and proposed 4(d) rule

    November 10, 2020 | 5 minute read

    What is the sickle darter? The sickle darter is a small, bottom-dwelling fish native to the upper Tennessee River drainage in North Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia. Sickle darters are typically found in slow flowing pools of larger, upland creeks and small to medium rivers. Where does the sickle darter occur? Historically (prior to 2005), the sickle darter was known to be found in nine tributary systems of the upper Tennessee River drainage in the following rivers in North Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia: Emory, Clinch, Powell, Little, French Broad, North Fork Holston, Middle Fork Holston, South Fork Holston and Watauga.  Learn more...

News

  • A small brown and yellow speckled fish in a biologists hand.
    Information icon Snail darter. USFWS

    Service Proposes Removing Storied Snail Darter from Endangered Species Act Due to Recovery

    August 31, 2021 | 5 minute read

    There was a time when the snail darter was the biggest little fish in the United States. In the 1970s, the tiny, endangered Tennessee fish was in the news regularly, the subject of a Supreme Court ruling, an act of Congress, and a giant proposed dam that threatened it with extinction. Inspired by its Endangered Species Act (ESA) protections, over the last 40 years conservation partners went to work protecting and restoring snail darters, conducting surveys that located additional populations, and reintroducing the fish to rivers it once called home.  Read the full story...

  • A parrot mid-flight with vibrant green feathers, with blue feathering on the tip of the wings. And red feathers above the beak
    Information icon Puerto Rican Parrot in flight. Photo by Jan Paul Zegarra, Biologist, USFWS

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Conducts Five-year Status Reviews of 37 Southeastern Species

    July 13, 2021 | 3 minute read

    As part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of 37 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife, and plants. These species are primarily found in the Southeastern United States and Puerto Rico, but are also known to occur in Delaware, Maryland, Missouri, New Jersey, Texas, and Virginia. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before September 13, 2021.  Read the full story...

  • Tiny yellow fish with brown speckling.
    Information icon Pearl darter. Photo credit: M. Wagner, USFWS.

    Service Proposes Critical Habitat for Threatened Pearl Darter in Mississippi

    July 12, 2021 | 5 minute read

    Today, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to designate critical habitat for the pearl darter, a small fish native to the Pascagoula River system of Mississippi and the Pearl River system of Mississippi and Louisiana. Pearl darters continue to survive in the Pascagoula River system but have not been seen in the Pearl River system for more than 40 years. “The protection of the pearl darter in 2017 under the Endangered Species Act paved the way for us to work together with our conservation partners in Mississippi on recovering the species,” said Leopoldo Miranda-Castro, the Service’s Regional Director.  Read the full story...

  • A small bird with grey and white feathers, perched on a tree branch.
    Information icon Adult elfin-woods warbler. Photo credit: Mike Morel

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Conducts Five-Year Status Reviews of 37 Southeastern Species

    June 22, 2021 | 2 minute read

    As part of the process mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA), the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will conduct five-year status reviews of 37 endangered or threatened fish, wildlife, and plants. These species are found primarily in the Southeastern United States, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic, Haiti, and the Virgin Islands. The public is invited to provide information and comments concerning these species on or before August 23, 2021.  Read the full story...

  • Small catfish with black speckling and noticeable the barbels ("whiskers") around the mouth.
    Information icon The Carolina madtom. Photo by D Biggins, former USFWS, 1992.

    Service Provides Endangered Species Protections for the Carolina Madtom and Neuse River Waterdog

    June 8, 2021 | 5 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service finalized regulations under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) to protect the Carolina madtom a small catfish, and the Neuse River waterdog, an aquatic salamander. The Carolina madtom will receive protection as an endangered species, and 257 river miles will be designated as its critical habitat. The Neuse River waterdog will be protected as a threatened species with an ESA Section 4(d) rule, and 779 river miles will be designated as its critical habitat.  Read the full story...

  • Yellow and brown mussels with a long shell.
    Information icon Yellow lance in the Tar River in North Carolina. Photo by Sarah McRae, USFWS.

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Finalizes Critical Habitat for Freshwater Mussel

    April 7, 2021 | 3 minute read

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) has finalized critical habitat under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) for the yellow lance, a freshwater mussel found only in the rivers and streams of North Carolina, Virginia and Maryland. The species was listed as threatened under the ESA in 2018 following population declines due to habitat loss and degradation. “Critical habitat is a specific geographic area that is essential for the conservation of a threatened or endangered species,” said Leo Miranda, Regional Director for the Service’s Southeast Region.  Read the full story...

  • A small fish with swimming above rocky substrate. Fish is striped tail to snout brown, black and white.
    Information icon Sickle darter; Photo by Crystal Ruble, Conservation Fisheries, Inc.

    Service proposes listing for the rare sickle darter fish from Upper Tennessee River Basin

    November 10, 2020 | 4 minute read

    Following a review of the best available science, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to list the sickle darter, a small slender-bodied fish native to the upper Tennessee River, as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The Service is also proposing a 4(d) rule, which tailors protections while allowing certain activities that do not hinder its recovery. Habitat loss and water quality degradation from a variety of sources are the primary threats to the species.  Read the full story...

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