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Tag: Everglades

The content below has been tagged with the term “Everglades.”

Articles

  • A vidographer films as a wildlife biologist returns a black snake to its natural habitat
    Information icon BBC-PBS crew filming TNC's David Printiss at TNC's Apalachicola Bluffs and Ravines Preserve with threatened eastern indigo snake. Photo by The Nature Conservancy.

    “PBS Nature: Wild Florida” Captures Beauty and Challenges of Conservation Work

    February 10, 2020 | 1 minute read

    Show airs 8 p.m. Feb. 12 Florida is well-known for its beaches and year-round sun, but it is also home to a wild side, with pine forests, coral reefs, manatees, and the Everglades, the largest subtropical wilderness in the United States. Every year, this state faces the full forces of nature: from wildfires to flooding to powerful hurricanes. Now, a growing human population, rising sea levels and abandoned exotic pets, like the Burmese python, are added threats to this wild paradise.  Learn more...

  • A vine grows over a small pond covered in algae and fallen shrub branches
    Information icon Okeechobee gourd vines spreading across the landscape at restoration site. Photo by Rob Hopper, South Florida Water Management District.

    Okeechobee gourd thriving at Everglades restoration site

    January 23, 2020 | 3 minute read

    The endangered Okeechobee gourd got a new home and started the new year, and for that matter, the new decade with a bang. Previous efforts to successfully translocate the gourd and establish new populations were relatively unsuccessful, due to issues that included hydrology, predation, and invasive competition. However, in the summer of 2019, several locations within the Sam Jones/Abiaki Prairie Restoration site south of Lake Okeechobee were planted with the gourd, and today they are thriving.  Learn more...

  • Four manatees and a school of fish assemble under crystal clear water.
    Information icon Manatees at Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge in Florida. Photo by David Hinkel.

    Manatees hanging out in mitigation feature in Southwest Florida

    May 15, 2019 | 3 minute read

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologists monitoring the progress of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) were excited to hear that up to 20 Florida manatees used the manatee mitigation feature south of Port of the Islands marina in Collier County, Florida, in January and February. Kim Dryden, biologist. Photo by USFWS. That manatee mitigation feature is a refugium built by the South Florida Water Management District a couple of years ago.  Learn more...

  • Over twenty African-American students and members of the Phi Beta Sigma fraternity posing for a photo.
    Information icon Members of the Phi Beta Sigma fraternity enjoy the outdoors at Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Phi Beta Sigma.

    Like birds of a feather

    February 4, 2019 | 3 minute read

    While the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. may not, at first glance, seem to have much in common, the two organizations, like birds of a feather, have been flocking together to develop young men as well as conserve fish, wildlife, and their habitats. Phi Beta Sigma (Sigma) is a fraternal organization founded in 1914 that focuses on issues that impact African American communities. The fraternity has over 700 collegiate and alumni chapters across the country.  Learn more...

  • An airboat operator sits back and watches the marsh burn.
    Information icon Prescribed fire at Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge.

    Fire as tool, and as friend

    August 24, 2018 | 8 minute read

    Fire – prescribed and carefully managed – can be a wildlands’ best friend. Wildlife officials tout its ecological benefits. Hunters, fishermen and birders laud its cattail-clearing, nutrient-adding attributes. Hydrologists praise unimpeded water flows. Photo by USFWS.  Learn more...

  • Four released birds spread their wings and take flight towards the blue sky.
    Information icon Migratory birds take to the skies after being uncaged at Everglades National Park. The birds had been seized as part of Operation Ornery Birds. Photo by Dan Chapman, USFWS.

    Taking flight to freedom

    April 17, 2018 | 6 minute read

    About 130 birds were released April 14 into Florida’s River of Grass by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials and partners at Everglades National Park headquarters near Homestead, Florida. The birds had been bought by undercover agents from illegal trappers and traffickers, and seized in a series of arrests in the days leading up to the release.  Learn more...

  • A large snake with a black and brown pattern on its back moving through the grass.
    Burmese python. Photo by Liz Barraco, FWC.

    Partnering across the Everglades to battle invasives

    April 13, 2016 | 4 minute read

    Florida is considered “Ground Zero” in America’s fight against the spread of non-native species with more non-native reptile and amphibian species than anywhere else in the world.  Learn more...

News

  • A bright yellow sun rises over the Atlantic Ocean.
    Information icon Sunrise at Nathanial P. Reed Hobe Sound National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by Diana Gu, USFWS.

    Service renames Florida refuge to honor conservationist Nathaniel Reed

    April 17, 2019 | 3 minute read

    Hobe Sound, Florida — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) honored today the late Nathaniel Pryor Reed with a ceremony highlighting the renaming of a wildlife refuge in his name. The Hobe Sound National Wildlife Refuge is now the Nathaniel P. Reed Hobe Sound National Wildlife Refuge. “From Jupiter Island to the Everglades, and Tallahassee to Washington, Nathaniel Reed was a consummate conservationist and steadfast defender of the natural world,” said Leo Miranda, the Service’s director for the Southeast.  Read the full story...

  • Small bird with dark olive-gray and the tail and wings are olive-brown.
    Cape Sable seaside sparrow. Photo by Brandon Trentler, CC BY 2.0.

    Corps and Service agree on actions for conserving cape sable seaside sparrow and restoring balance to Everglades ecosystem

    July 22, 2016 | 5 minute read

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) are taking additional steps under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) to restore balance to the Florida Everglades ecosystem and help reverse decades-long population declines of the endangered Cape Sable seaside sparrow. These steps are outlined in a new biological opinion on the Corps’ Everglades Restoration Transition Plan (ERTP), which was implemented in 2012 to guide improved management of water flows in the Everglades.  Read the full story...

  • A large snake with a black and brown pattern on its back moving through the grass.
    Burmese python. Photo by Liz Barraco, FWC.

    Salazar announces ban on importation and interstate transportation of four giant snakes that threaten Everglades

    January 17, 2012 | 4 minute read

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has finalized a rule that would ban the importation and interstate transportation of four nonnative constrictor snakes that threaten the Everglades and other sensitive ecosystems across the United States, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar announced today. The final rule – which incorporates public comments, economic analysis, and environmental assessment – lists the Burmese python, the yellow anaconda, and the northern and southern African pythons as injurious wildlife under the Lacey Act in order to restrict their spread in the wild in the United States.  Read the full story...

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