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Tag: Environmental Interpretation

The content below has been tagged with the term “Environmental Interpretation.”

Articles

  • Eight volunteers, half women, half men, pose in front of the welcome sign at Bayou Teche NWR
    Information icon AmeriCorps NCCC crew at Bayou Teche National Wildlife Refuge. Photo by USFWS.

    Bayou Teche boardwalk trail open for adventure thanks to volunteers

    January 30, 2019 | 2 minute read

    As the cypress and tupelo trees along the bayou began to turn their fall yellow and russet colors, an AmeriCorps National Civilian Community Corps (NCCC) team arrived in Southeast Louisiana. This traveling crew of eight young adults, aged 18 to 25, were excited to gain leadership and job skills while making a difference at Bayou Teche refuge. Their stewardship mission for three weeks was to repair an interpretive boardwalk that winds through a wetland area.  Learn more...

Charleston

  • A kayaker navigates her boat through a flooded forest.
    Information icon Kayaking through Sparkleberry Swamp. Photo by USFWS.

    Outdoor recreation

    Our nation has one of the world’s largest networks of protected public lands set aside for the enjoyment of the American people. This vast network supports a healthy outdoor recreation industry, providing millions of jobs across the U.S. and generating billions of dollars for the economy. These jobs and revenue in turn help support local communities and fund conservation efforts. So whether you are hunting, fishing, or hiking, you’re not just renewing your spirit and improving your health, you’re also contributing to the future of conserving and enhancing our natural heritage for future generations.  Learn more...

Waterfowl

  • A hunter and his brown dog on its hind legs look out of the opening of a duck blind
    Information icon Two sportsmen enjoying a morning waterfowl hunt. Photo by Stacey Hayden, USFWS.

    Public access

    Hunting Waterfowl hunters are required to follow state and federal regulations when hunting on national wildlife refuges, including purchasing and carrying a Federal Duck Stamp. Duck Stamps are one of the most successful conservation tools ever created to protect habitat for migratory birds and help ensure abundant waterfowl populations in the future. Approximately 98% of the revenue generated by Duck Stamps goes directly to help acquire and protect wetlands. These wetlands in turn help purify water, aid in flood control, reduce soil erosion, and provide lots of other recreation opportunities.  Learn more...

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