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Tag: Environmental Education

The content below has been tagged with the term “Environmental Education.”

Articles

  • A mother and three children pose for a photograph at the hatchery.
    Information icon Enjoying the outdoors. Photo by Crystal Thomas, USFWS.

    Double days of fishing at Chattahoochee Forest National Fish Hatchery

    July 20, 2017 | 1 minute read

    Chattahoochee Forest National Fish Hatchery near Suches, Georgia, hosted a Seniors Fishing Rodeo for adults aged 55 and older on June 2 and a Family Fishing Festival for youth aged 16 and under on June 3. Both of the events drew large crowds.  Learn more...

  • A family looks at a diarama with USFWS staff.
    Information icon Exploring wetland science. Photo by Moria Painter, USFWS.

    Wolf Creek celebrates Earth Day all weekend

    July 20, 2017 | 1 minute read

    Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery in Kentucky celebrated Earth Day in a big way this year, with not one but two events. This spring, Wolf Creek hosted an Earth Day event by partnering with many state and local agencies including The Friends of Wolf Creek National Fish Hatchery, Lindsey Wilson College, Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, Kentucky Division of Water, and the Russell County Library. About 300 visitors participated in the event.  Learn more...

Podcasts

  • A dozen children check out small insects that were collected in the river.
    Students gathered around the macroinvertebrate table. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Getting kids in the water

    November 10, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Most of the kids entered the water with eager anticipation, net in hand, happily getting their shoes and shorts wet while adult not only looked on, but encouraged them to explore the river. It was the second annual Toe River Valley Festival, an event that brought nearly every 5th grader in North Carolina’s Yancey and Mitchell County’s out into a river in their community.  Learn more...

  • A furry brown bat baring its teeth.
    Tri-colored bat from the 2011 bat blitz. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Bat blitz 2011

    November 3, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. In a tiny meeting room in Nebo, North Carolina, at the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, planning began in earnest for the 2011 Bat Blitz – an effort that will bring dozens of biologists from across the Southeast to North Carolina’s Avery County for an intensive three days of collecting information on the area’s bat populations. Nearly 10 years old, the bat blitz is becoming a tradition among southern biologists.  Learn more...

  • A man with a head lamp looks for spiders below a rock outcrop.
    Fred Coyle searching for spruce-fir moss spiders. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Spruce-fir moss spider

    October 27, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Our two-year old daughter has picked up a fascination with spiders, stemming from, as near as we can interpret, a bad dream involving the 8-legged creatures. Perhaps a little odd, since to our knowledge she’s never had a negative interaction with the animals, but now she takes the time to call attention to any spider webs she comes across and pauses and stares curiously at any spiders she finds.  Learn more...

  • A dozen people in waders engaging with the river
    Haywood County leaders exploring the Pigeon River. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Teacher water quality workshops

    September 29, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Deep Creek flows out of the southern side of Great Smoky Mountains National Park, just outside of Bryson City. A popular weekend spot, entering the park by Deep Creek takes you through a gauntlet of tube rental companies, doing their part to help people enjoy the stream. On a recent Monday afternoon, this popular spot was besieged by a group of teachers from Swain, Macon, and Jackson Counties.  Learn more...

  • A teacher with a wide smile points towards a student.
    RiverLink education coordinator Hayley Smith talking with students on the South Toe River. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Toe River Valley Festival

    September 22, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The streams of the Toe River Valley, in North Carolina’s Yancey and Mitchell Counties, are home to the endangered Appalachian elktoe mussel. The headwaters of these rivers can be found on the shoulders of Roan Mountain to the north, and Mount Mitchell to the south, each home to an array of rare plants and animals. From the standpoint of biodiversity, this is one of the most important areas in the Southern Appalachians, and as of yet, still one of the most rural.  Learn more...

  • Students in waders standing in a shallow river looking at insects with an instructor.
    Students circle around to see insects on a rock. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Taking responsibility for river stewardship

    September 15, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. There’s a game I do with students, it’s called Common Water. People stand in a circle around a bucket of clean water. The people are a community, the bucket their common source of water. Each person assumes the role of part of the community – a farm, a town center, a housing development. Each person has a sponge and is given 30 seconds to use that sponge to get water from the bucket and put it in a cup at their feet, representing their use of the water.  Learn more...

  • A woman in a pink shirt sits in the dirt planting flowers.
    Out of the container, into the ground. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Mountain Heritage High Schools Eco-club - what students are doing for their community

    May 11, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. Yancey County’s Cane River was once home to part of a thriving population of endangered Appalachian elktoe mussels. Recently beset with problems, hopefully through careful stewardship it will once again become a vibrant and beautiful river. The Cane River also runs past Mountain Heritage High School, the only public high school in Yancey Country. This year marks the fourth anniversary, and thus the first full graduating class, of the high school’s Eco-Club.  Learn more...

  • A dozen children check out small insects that were collected in the river.
    Students gathered around the macroinvertebrate table. Photo by Gary Peeples, USFWS.

    Haywood County kids hit the water

    January 5, 2010 | 2 minute read

    Transcript Greetings and welcome to the Southern Appalachian Creature Feature. The headwaters of the Pigeon River are just off the Blue Ridge Parkway. The river flows northwest across North Carolina’s Haywood County, crossing into Tennessee before joining the French Broad River. The town of Canton, North Carolina straddles the river and is home to a paper mill that was the historical source of water quality problems that eliminated much of the life in the river for miles downstream - one of the most egregious examples of water pollution in the Southern Appalachians.  Learn more...

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